Railroad Line Forums - Upgrading a Pocher boxcar
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 3 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 90 ]  [ Total: 93 ]  [ Newest Member: Patrick Loves Steam ]
 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Early Rail Forum
 Upgrading a Pocher boxcar
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Previous Topic: New W&N Topic Next Topic: Big NWSL News
Page: of 3

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 07/28/2019 :  2:16:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Come on, dave1905... you can do it!

I wanna' see your models.

Andre



Country: | Posts: 819 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 07/28/2019 :  10:02:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
dave1905

Ya' did it!

Nice. I certainly like the roof better than what's stock. Stock is just too distinctive.

Andre



Country: | Posts: 819 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/28/2019 :  10:20:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice work on upgrading that boxcar, Dave.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 15280 Go to Top of Page

dave1905
Fireman



Posted - 07/28/2019 :  11:44:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit dave1905's Homepage  Reply with Quote
One thing I am not as happy about on the rebuilds is that the stock car sides have very deep grooves between the boards. I have several more on hand to make some more XMb's. However, by the time I redo the roof and roofwalk, the underframe, add some grabs, put on new doors, etc., I'm basically just using part of the shell. If I sanded off the grabs and end doors, it would be almost easier to just scratch the whole car. 8(

Dave Husman

Iron Men and wooden cars
Visit my website : www.wnbranch.com

Country: USA | Posts: 1147 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 07/29/2019 :  3:25:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dave1905

it would be almost easier to just scratch the whole car. 8(



For me it is easier, quicker to scratch built and give better results.

Bob




It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5272 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/29/2019 :  4:09:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I agree. Iíve scraped my last grabiron.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Edited by - Michael Hohn on 07/29/2019 4:10:13 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 5432 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 07/29/2019 :  6:52:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bob/Mike...

WIMPS!



Andre



Country: | Posts: 819 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/29/2019 :  7:01:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by OK Hogger

Bob/Mike...

WIMPS!





Hey! No name-calling.



Country: USA | Posts: 5432 Go to Top of Page

Tintic Range
New Hire

Posted - 07/30/2019 :  12:04:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If I was going for a contest-level car I would also scratchbuild. As it is, my goal with this project is to add a unique car to my roster quickly and at low cost. I'm sure we're all familiar with the price in both time and money that the laser-cut and resin kits carry.

As such, I'm also not being too picky as far as prototype accuracy; I only have the one photo from the SL&O yard to work from, the rest is conjecture...at least, until I find some more and try building the MP prototypes. Thanks all for sharing the drawings; now to track down a copy of that RMC.

Anyway, on to the details. Strip styrene of course for the braces on the "A" end and the runningboards, some spare Tichy parts for the "B" end.

Download Attachment: Capture.JPG
80.18 KB



Download Attachment: Capture2.JPG
99.15 KB

So far the goal of "cheap" is being met. Excluding the cost of whatever decals I decide to use, the car will cost me about $10.



Country: | Posts: 12 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 07/30/2019 :  01:55:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yup! I'm on the cheap n' quick band wagon, too! I like what you're doing. Looking forward to more!

Andre



Country: | Posts: 819 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/30/2019 :  08:54:23 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thatís going to look real nice when painted up.


Country: USA | Posts: 5432 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/30/2019 :  09:24:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you replace the wheelsets with the right axle length ReBoxx wheelsets, the trucks from that kit roll quite nicely. And they're short wheelbase, 4' 9" if I remember right. With a bit of weathering, they look fine.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7863 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 07/30/2019 :  11:02:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Agreed, Mike going to look good. In fact, he's doing more to his (detail parts) than I have been to my Bachmann look-alikes!

Rolling characteristics:

With some of the trucks, IF you're careful, you can also spread (fatigue) the truck sides just a bit with your fingers to gain the needed clearance for good rolling with Kadee wheel sets. We're only talking a few thousands that's needed.

With others, I simply use an smaller sized drill in my pin vise into the journal (coming in from underneath the opposite journal, and after a few twists, clearance is created.

Andre



Country: | Posts: 819 Go to Top of Page

Tintic Range
New Hire

Posted - 07/31/2019 :  10:20:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Unless my car is an anomaly, the Kadee wheelsets actually slip right into the Pocher trucks and roll freely without modification.

On to painting. I wanted to try some new techniques, and I wanted a heavily-weathered car. Living in close vicinity of several high-desert railroads (Nevada Northern is a day trip, for example) I picked some real life wood cars to replicate. Wood weathers very differently from metal, so the techniques I've used weathering modern cars aren't as applicable here.

First step was to give the entire car a single coat of black, a trick I learned from my uncle who does World War II wargaming miniatures. It looks real ugly right now, but don't worry.


Download Attachment: Capture3.JPG
140.1 KB

The next coat of paint was Pewter Gray, giving the car a nice weathered bare wood appearance as the base. I swear I took a picture of this step but I can't find it now.

I painted the roof silver and once it dried used the salt method. This was the first time I tried it, so unfortunately I made the mistake of using Redmond Salt (pink rock salt from a mine on the abandoned D&RGW Marysvale Branch)which was too large of a grind and took some of the silver paint with it when I rubbed it off.

Finally, I used Apple Barrel Barn Red and applied 10-15 drybrushed coats dragged downward from the eaves to simulate aging paint. Areas protected by any horizontal features such as under the door tracks, the doors, the door hardware, and the brake platform received more paint. I then touched up any metal parts with an extra layer since the prototype cars show that for some reason old linseed paints survive better on metal surfaces than wood.


Download Attachment: Capture.JPG
96.16 KB



Download Attachment: Capture2.JPG
187.67 KB

I forgot to mention that the truss rods were replaced with monofilament and Grandt Line turnbuckles. I still need to weather the trucks and underframe.



Country: | Posts: 12 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/01/2019 :  09:50:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One thing you'll notice on both houses and cars is the very bottom of the wood tends to be dark. That's because rain stops there, deposits dirt, and sometimes encourages mildew to grow. This is an easy effect to get, put a little bit of medium brown paint on the brush (like drybrushing) and hold it at a 45 degree angle along the base of the car. That'll put some paint on the bottom edge of the siding, and get some paint along the very bottom of the sides.

And that's another example of a "canvas roof" from pieces of paper.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7863 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 3 Previous Topic: New W&N Topic Next Topic: Big NWSL News  
 New Topic |   Reply to Topic | 
Previous Page | Next Page
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-19 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.47 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000