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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/30/2019 :  8:56:27 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tloc


I don’t see why admin here would have a problem with you posting that here. You won’t get as many at a boys but you will have a more conversational conversation with the Crew here.

TomO here Tom there



I agree. Comments and questions here tend to be positive and constructive.

Although I won't necessarily build a RSU, I learn something about electronics whenever I take time to understand the discussion and that might be useful in the future.

Meanwhile, Jim's original question goes unanswered . . .

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Edited by - Michael Hohn on 01/30/2019 8:58:39 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 4985 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 01/30/2019 :  10:21:40 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Ok, first I like to say thanks for everybody's support. The reason I asked is the fact of our sue happy society. It seems like many don't take responsibility of there own actions and like to blame ours for their failure. Remember that those kind of people would be more than happy to blame the author and/or the forum owners. That's why I asked for an OK.

Second, Jim's question might not get an answer from the membership here do to the fact that this forum is more about structure building than soldering up a brass project. I hope he does get an answer though.

Now, I've gathered up the posts I did on two other forums and need to go through those posts to present a coherent post. I also need to retake some pictures that I must have deleted. I built the RSU over four years ago. With the TT scale engine house project, the chopper project and the fueling facility module project, it'll take awhile to get this project together.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3099 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 01/31/2019 :  08:56:27 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I surfed over to the American Beauty Tools site to look at what they have. I was amazed to find they sold several units. I did have a heart stopping moment when I saw the price of those units, but they look to be top quality. The tooling that goes a long with the RSU unit look to be top notch. The unit I would purchase if I was going to go the buying route would be the Model 10504 Standard unit. Why? There's a saying when buying a lathe or a mill that you purchase a larger one than you think you need because you always cut small parts on a big machine, but you can not cut big parts on a small machine. So, if the RSU has a bit more power for soldering so much the better than not having enough. At $682 you get a very nice package. Add to that any of the other hand tools available which range from $86.00 to $1400 and you've got a nice RSU system when you get into manufacturing of brass models.

In my opinion that is money wasted just to build a small number of brass projects. Better off to buy something like what Micro Mark offer's. The mid-range unit is rated at 1100 watts, that's close to a steam iron. My DYI unit puts out over 800 watts, approximately 200amps at the probes end at 4 volts. At full "throttle" my unit will melt an 1/8" dia. stainless steal rod in just a few seconds.

So my advice is if you are afraid of electricity, don't understand, or are just not inclined to want to build one then by all means buy one. No one is twisting your arm to build one. You do have one other choice. If you have or know somebody that would be willing to build you one, then go for it.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 3099 Go to Top of Page

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/31/2019 :  09:06:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Bernd, for the valuable 'hands on' research!

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 4309 Go to Top of Page

tloc
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/31/2019 :  09:22:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim, I have a rather unhappy opinion of MicroMart but I have never purchased any of there electronic tools. IMO some of the stuff I have purchased from them are knockoffs or rebranded. Some acquaintances have the rotary tools and drill presses and I am not impressed. My feeling and practice is review, review and buy the best tool I can afford.

I am not into electronics but I read everything Bernd writes here and at MRH. Seems to me right up your alley.

TomO



Country: USA | Posts: 2761 Go to Top of Page

k9wrangler
Engineer



Posted - 01/31/2019 :  09:38:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by tloc

Seems to me right up your alley.

Pssst...”Hey Meester wanna deal on a soldering unit?....”


Karl Scribner
Sunfield Twp. Michigan
H.M.F.I.C
Kentucky Southern Railway
The Spartan Line

Country: USA | Posts: 10203 Go to Top of Page

DWARN
New Hire

Posted - 01/31/2019 :  4:54:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Jim - I purchased the PBL 400watt unit several years ago and have never looked back. Never had any problems but I learned the hard way that if you are soldering track leads make sure any piece of electrical equip is disconnected from the track feed. Thankfully I just fried a cheap old MRC throttle I was using for testing track connections and not the NCE unit.


Country: | Posts: 45 Go to Top of Page

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/31/2019 :  10:32:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Doug,

That's a great tip! Probably some heavy duty ground loops to consider. How are things in the shop? My son still mentions what a cool place you guys have there. I told him to keep saving his pennies.

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 4309 Go to Top of Page

DWARN
New Hire

Posted - 02/01/2019 :  10:26:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Everyone left last Sunday for winter testing in Phoenix so its nice and quiet now.


Country: | Posts: 45 Go to Top of Page

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/01/2019 :  1:08:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Neat! When this weather breaks, maybe we'll hit that greasy spoon on 136 just west of I-65 for lunch.

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 4309 Go to Top of Page

bitlerisvj
Fireman

Posted - 02/01/2019 :  3:30:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Burley Jim, I'm a bit late to this dance, but may as well put in my 2 cents. I have a 100 watt American Beauty and it is just fine for HO scale detail work on brass locos. I replaced a headlight that had come off of a Gem A5s. I wouldn't have dreamed of doing this with a soldering iron. The solder joints on the Gem were very low temp soft solder. I found out while repairing the frame. Fortunately I was able to repair that without additional damage.
Anyway if you have the bucks, go for the 250 watt as that will be more than adequate for HO scale and probably ok for O scale as well. The 100 watt version I have has done an awful lot of detail work on my Kemtron 2-6-0 that really wouldn't have worked easily if at all with a torch or soldering iron. I actually used a torch, soldering iron and the resistance tool on it, so it is really just one more tool in the arsenal.
BTW, it does a beautiful job of soldering leads onto rail.
There is nothing wrong with building your own using a discarded Microwave transformer. The hard part is making the tweezers, the probe tool, and the foot switch. My American Beauty came with the tweezers and foot switch. I did make my own probe, but not sure how useful it is.
Regards, Vic B.



Country: USA | Posts: 1436 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/01/2019 :  9:55:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I have an American Beauty 100W unit with pointy metal tweezers and foot switch. It's nice, except that you have to clean the tweezer points fairly frequently to get reliable contact with the pieces you're joining.

I also have one of the old Triton "transformer with two taps and carbon electrode tweezers" units. MicroMark has offered something similar (presumably not made in CT) but I've no experience with it. Here, the electrodes are rather bulky but don't corrode. Once in a while I have to take the tweezers apart and fiddle with the switch built into them.

Which I use depends on the situation. AB's adjustable power is nice, but getting contact sometimes disturbs the parts. The Triton is more portable. Both have enough zorch to resolder relatively heavy brass.



Country: USA | Posts: 5847 Go to Top of Page

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/01/2019 :  10:46:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James, Is that the AB model 10599? I'm 'eyeing' that one now.

Jim




Country: USA | Posts: 4309 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/03/2019 :  11:57:57 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
The 10599 has a similar layout to my 15-20 year old unit, but the powerhead and foot switch seem to have been updated. My electrodes appear to have been plated, perhaps over copper. Perhaps I'll see if what's available now has changed.


Country: USA | Posts: 5847 Go to Top of Page

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/03/2019 :  12:04:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James,

The output on both of these units is 60 HZ AC, right?



Country: USA | Posts: 4309 Go to Top of Page
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