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Author Previous Topic: NMRA AP Scenery Certificate Support Thread Topic Next Topic: Harmony Junction Switching Layout
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BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/01/2019 :  10:24:28 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Try adding some 'retarder' to the follow-on pours, and it might eliminate the cracking.

Jim


Take the red pill

Country: USA | Posts: 6154 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/02/2019 :  8:07:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My goal now is to fill in the cracks and dips. I poured some of the gloss medium into the dips, and tried to spread it out with a brush. That didn't work well. Then I got a bit of inspiration. I took my bottle of 'wet water' and lightly spritzed the top of the medum. That did seem to help it level out more. A couple more small pours, and I should have things pretty much level. Then I'll do some very translucent "water color" before I think about the Magic Water top coat.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 8831 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/07/2019 :  12:13:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I decided to go back to structures and build a warehouse for the mill products. This should have been another brick building, but I was tired of brick and wanted to do a wood structure..

I go through a lot of 1/8 stock for bracing


This will be close to the tracks (no loading dock)


And a view "in context"


dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 10/07/2019 12:13:56 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 8831 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 10/07/2019 :  3:52:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looking good, Dave. I like the variety of materials and architecture. I wonder what color you will paint the newest factory.


Country: USA | Posts: 7189 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/07/2019 :  3:56:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Looking good, Dave. I like the variety of materials and architecture. I wonder what color you will paint the newest factory.



Walls will be white, I think. Not sure what I'll paint the trim/windows. Mineral red/brown would probably be an historical color, but that won't get me much contrast with the brick mill.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 8831 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/07/2019 :  4:29:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
White can look really good, but what about a light yellow? That would showcase the wood and look pretty good as well.

I like where this is going!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 7524 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/07/2019 :  4:54:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Not sure the cheap-ass Yankee mill owners would spring for the pigment in their lead paint, but that's an interesting idea!

But after doing some more research, the linseed oil binder tended to produce a very light yellow/straw color rather than the stark white. Another possibility would be light grey (bone black mixed in with the white paint.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 10/07/2019 5:15:43 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 8831 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/07/2019 :  5:41:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You want grey, look out the window!

The more I think about this, the better I like the yellow idea. Your building reminds me of a couple of SRMW wooden mills, and some 1:1 ones I've seen in New England, all of which were that pale yellow straw color you describe.

Have a Ball, and remember that Rule One governs!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 7524 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 10/07/2019 :  6:35:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave great choice for going with the wood.
I love the clapboard siding look.

Did you have a plan for the building or is this your own design?? Either way its going to fit perfectly.


Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 13194 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/07/2019 :  6:53:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,

I agree with Jerry. One more argument in favor of the pale yellow comes from the realization that this is a capital asset in which the "cheap-ass Yankee mill owners" have invested a considerable amount of money. Back in the day, a good-looking facility was the sign of competent management and a good place to do business, so the signage would have been properly punctuated and the mill, when new, at least, would have been painted an appropriate color, with the paint being mixed on-site by a Master Painter. The yellow, which would be enhanced by the interaction of the linseed oil and the pigment, would have been a logical choice.

It's a concept....

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 7524 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 10/07/2019 :  7:51:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

My 2 cents: I have found dead white to be unpleasant and not very real looking; additionally, Floquil White covered very poorly. One of my favorite Floquil colors was Antique White, which had a yellow cast to it, consistent with what your research shows regarding linseed oil. It also covered well. Something similar can probably be found in a craft acrylic.

Mike


_________________________________________________
Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

Country: USA | Posts: 7189 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/07/2019 :  7:53:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's a freelance design, but based on typical patterns, particular the clerestory which was common in the period after the Civil War. I went to a fascinating pair of talks in Amesbury, MA a couple weeks ago. The first speaker talked about the evolution of mill design, and the second talked about how they used the water power. Wooden mills (and presumably warehouses) were more common than we know, because most of them burned down.

I probably should have gone with a wider window spacing, warehouses didn't need as much outside light as the mills did, but I think there's enough spacing, as well as the materiel difference, to make the warehouse look different from the mills.

The building is 14" long, if anyone wants to know. I went back and measured it. :-)

I went with a light straw color. If I don't like it, it's Pete's fault. I'll probably do the windows in a brighter white. (I prepped the windows tonight, cleaning them in a 10% solution of "Super Clean". I'm using a pair of metal double door castings, which I soaked in a vinegar and dishwasher solution first, to etch them a bit.)

Lots going on this week/weekend (geology field trip to Vermont), so I might not make much more progress until next week.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 10/07/2019 8:36:00 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 8831 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/07/2019 :  8:47:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK, if it's gonna be "Pete's fault," then Pete, being a very nice guy despite the publicity, should let you know that his favorite for this application is Ceramcoat "Old Parchment," which, not having been purchased recently, may have been given an entirely new name by now. Paint companies are like that... they change names every few years so they have a "new" color....

It's a light yellow that looks, to my eye and light, anyway, pretty good on the building. White or very dark green trim will go well, too.

YMMV.

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 7524 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/08/2019 :  08:36:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I like "Old Parchment" - it's a great drybrush highlight color. It's similar to the artist color "Titanium Buff." The one I used is a 'weathered white' that is a bit more yellow. Photos later, I want to make sure the paint is fully dry before I remove the weights (to keep it from warping).

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 10/08/2019 09:06:18 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 8831 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/08/2019 :  6:59:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's the wall color:


Dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 8831 Go to Top of Page
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