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Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 01/21/2018 :  4:04:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote


A friend approached me last year to help him out by building up his machines from the Sierra West Machine Shop Series in O-Scale.



As the cover of the instruction manual showcases...these are great looking models!
But, they had remained on my shelf for some time. I was starting to feel guilty and began looking at the machines over the last couple of months.
Thanks to Bruce for organizing the latest forum challenge. It spurred me on to get another of the machines (the universal miller) out of the contents of its bag and to build it in the new year as part of the group challenge. Feel free to check the challenge out in the Mike Chambers' Craftman's Corner.



To start this thread off, I'll share with you my building of the 36" vertical drill.
All I can say is "Thank Heavens these machines are in O and not HO, my regular modelling scale!"



As I mentioned in the challenge thread while building the other machine, this project will be a personal challenge for me.
I know nothing pertaining to the operations of these machines never having worked in a mill.



Furthermore, I know "next to nothing" about the terminology of most of the parts. Thanks to Brett for putting together these amazing models and thanks for the amazing parts list and corresponding diagrams!



Remember, I have already built this model up. The purpose of the thread is to take you through the steps along the way with any problem-solving measures I had to dream up.



Here is a picture of the universal miller I just completed in the challenge. Thanks so much for checking in!
Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

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BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/21/2018 :  4:19:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I fear you're being swayed to the Dark Side.

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 3257 Go to Top of Page

sierrawest
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/21/2018 :  4:20:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit sierrawest's Homepage  Reply with Quote
These are such a treat to see being built up Mike! The Miller looks awesome, what a wonderful job.

They are definitely challenging to produce and build in O Scale but would be impossible in HO. Way too many tiny details! But that is why they look so good.

I'll check in and certainly enjoy your progress. I'm always a phone call or email away if you have any questions! Have fun and thanks for sharing your build.

Brett



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ed k
Fireman

Posted - 01/21/2018 :  4:44:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim, There are worst things. Pre shaken sodas.
ed



Country: USA | Posts: 1091 Go to Top of Page

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/21/2018 :  4:50:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sierrawest

These are such a treat to see being built up Mike! The Miller looks awesome, what a wonderful job.

They are definitely challenging to produce and build in O Scale but would be impossible in HO. Way too many tiny details! But that is why they look so good.

I'll check in and certainly enjoy your progress. I'm always a phone call or email away if you have any questions! Have fun and thanks for sharing your build.

Brett



It is a beauty!

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 3257 Go to Top of Page

Craig H
Fireman

Posted - 01/22/2018 :  10:25:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have 2 sets of CHB machinery that I bought from Charlie years ago when the price was right


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jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/22/2018 :  10:58:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
"Home Shop Machinist" and "Live Steam & Outdoor Railroading" are good magazines to start learning about mills, drills and lathes. In their pages, your "universal miller" is called a "horizontal mill", for the orientation of the spindle. This thread's belt-drive drill press is why you see old drills with Morse-taper shanks at flea markets - chucks were a luxury in that era.


Country: USA | Posts: 5564 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/22/2018 :  12:07:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I built them all. I'm getting ready to build a machine shop for them. If you need help let me know.

www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=42436


Jerry

"And in the end, its not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Edited by - TRAINS1941 on 01/22/2018 7:56:25 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 10429 Go to Top of Page

time2play
Fireman



Posted - 01/22/2018 :  6:51:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote



Mike, it's great to see you back on the forum. We've missed you...

Bob



Country: Canada | Posts: 1123 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 01/22/2018 :  8:09:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Midas Mike, I'm am certain, that in your very capable hands, these little machines will turn out golden.

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 7662 Go to Top of Page

NE Brownstone
Crew Chief



Posted - 01/23/2018 :  07:07:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit NE Brownstone's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I used to own a full size Hendy universal toolroom mill just like that one. That model is about as close to the original as you can get to the real thing. Dead nut on. The only difference is that mine was retrofitted with a motor and gearbox that was mounted on top since my shop and the one I bought it from didn't have any line shafting and instead of the belts for the feed on the back end mine used silent chain. A word of note, with a special geared dividing head the mill could make twist drill bits and reamers. Not that I ever made one, but it could. Another note, the table was powered in all 3 axis, not just in the x.

Also owned a drill press like that one too. Big old beast. Stood about 8 ft tall, if not more.



Edited by - NE Brownstone on 01/23/2018 07:09:41 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 588 Go to Top of Page

Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 01/26/2018 :  5:30:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote


Here's the box as I opened a couple of months ago. Egads! There's a lot of little models in there! What have I gotten myself into!

Hi Jim, Yessirree...I think I have been swayed to the black hole of fine scale modelling of these amazing kits! If not swayed, perhaps tugged and pulled!
Brett, thanks for you very kind words. It is indeed a pleasure to take my time in order to produce a nice looking model for each of the machines in the shop. As mentioned by others, the level of detail is "next to none!"
Ed, I feel like I've been "pre-shaken" as I slowly assimilate the knowledge and information with regard to these shop machines.
Craig, feel free to post some pics of your HO versions at any time!
James, thanks so much for offering up the advice pertinent to magazine research on the topic.
Jerry, like Craig...feel free to post any of your pics from your build of these kits or any links to threads you may have on them.
Bob, thanks for the kind words as well. Yes, it feels really good to be back.
Greg, thanks, too. Not sure if my hands produce golden work...sometimes they feel like mud after a session at the workbench in tandem with an evening's jam on the guitar with my bandmates!
Russ, thanks for your fine words drawing from first hand experience. I'm learning a lot about the machines from the input of those who have actually worked on them!



I use my trusty razor blade to remove any flash or parting lines from the column. I draw the blade slowly in a downwards or away motion only.



In order to not have any parts roll off the workbench a case saved from another model offers a safe haven.



To begin the assembly, I check the fit of the counter shaft bracket in relation to the holes on the base and the fit of the column.



They fit like a charm. Note how I've already drilled the holes in the counter shaft bracket to accommodate the shaft itself. Let's check in on how that went.



Holes must be drilled for both the counter shaft and the belt striker shaft. (Remember...all this terminology is new to me and I have to reference the beautifully detailed drawing continuously.)



Beginning the drilling.



Through one hole.



The shaft fits! Yabba dabba doo! (I've come to realization over time that you should always have some new or "fresh" drill bits on hand. What a difference they make in getting the job down in a minimal amount of time.)



Looking good so far.



A full model view.



I'm just doing a test fit of the two columns in relation to each other. The next step will be to clear some more bearing holes in the upper section of the columns.



Because some of the apertures to be drilled our are miniscule, I get my trusty mini-awl to create a dimple in the white metal...a hole starter of sorts.



I use very light pressure and line up the device very carefully.



In no time the openings are created for the drive shaft on the one column.



The drive shaft opening on the main column is done.



I've gently placed the parts together with no glue and the drill is coming together.



I check the alignment from above of the lower segment of the column.



Again, nothing is glued together at the moment and some sections have spread apart. I'm just testing the fit of the two shafts, the drive shaft and now the back gear shaft. Will post more later!


Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

Edited by - Mike Hamer on 01/26/2018 5:31:19 PM

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ed k
Fireman

Posted - 01/26/2018 :  6:02:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice Mike. A gentle hand is required. Outstanding kits. A joy to follow along.
ed



Country: USA | Posts: 1091 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/26/2018 :  7:41:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Mike,

Im enjoying your voyage of discovery.

A model railroading friend gave me a box of little clear plastic containers, which I politely accepted, thinking what for do I need these? Turns out they were very useful when I built a half dozen machines for my car shop, each lathe, drill press, etc allocated to its own box.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 3767 Go to Top of Page

Guff
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/27/2018 :  11:31:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OMG Mike,
Small parts turned into beautiful machinery.
Definitely impressive!!
Dave



Country: USA | Posts: 1438 Go to Top of Page

Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 01/28/2018 :  06:37:06 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote


Thanks so much, Ed, Mike and Dave, for following along!
I've quickly done a light painting job on the column knowing that touch-ups will be required as I add and "slide" details around.



I'm staying with the sage green colour that will eventually be weathered with pan-pastels and washes of black.



For reference, the paint is "Apple Barrel" 20568 Sage Green.



Note how I've momentarily slid the table support up the column with the table elevating collar placed below it. These are "test fits".
Yes some paint is rubbing off...no worries as it will be dealt with later.



I've slid the drill head onto the dovetail.
Brett indicates that it may need some filing as it is a tight fit.
The black skinny arrow showcases an area where I've drilled a hole for the spindle shaft to sit later. I've also drilled a hole for a drill shank which will later be placed on the spindle.



A narrow file will do the trick in clearing out the back of the drill ahead in order for it to slide nicely up the dovetail.



Not too much work required to file the area.



Done.



Ah! Lovely! The head slides up the dovetail nicely!



Where we are at the moment.


Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

Edited by - Mike Hamer on 01/28/2018 06:39:22 AM

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