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Author Previous Topic: Dirty Stuff Topic Next Topic: São Martins de Rio Valbergue
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Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/29/2016 :  6:06:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Pennman

Tony,
You're off to leaps and bounds. Another method that works well is adding some windshield washer fluid to your brush as you paint on color. That seems to also make the craft paint flow better, especially on wood. I've never tried it on any other medium. There's no need to try to find acrylic thinner, since it's not readily available and it is a cheaper alternative. Another great tip From Karl O. I was thinking of your merthod so chosen would get too much paint in areas that you wouldn't want, perhaps too thick.
Rich



I've never tried that, Rich. Water works for me, I add just a brush dip's worth, just enough to keep it going. Being an artist as well, I do this with acrylics on my paintings. I'd rather not use a chemical, to be honest, one reason I don't like Floquil, I have to use paint thinner to clean the brush. A good tip for others though. The amount of paint I put on at any time is small, and I scrub it in like I am trying to remove it. I don't ever get too much.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2531 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/30/2016 :  3:34:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
One thing I found with this kit, is there are no addendum pages pointing out the errors they found as they built it.

I noticed, that on page 18 they label one wall #3, and on pg. 19, #3 is shown as the lower wall on the template. But on page 21, the photo they took to show assembly, shows #3, the lower wall, crossed out and a #1 is written in it's place. Apparently, they re-named it as they discovered their mistake, soooooo... make sure you double check everything before you glue anything together. As it turns out, wall #3 should be #1 on the "roof plan" shown here:



OK, that being said, I had to flip the walls end over end to see how it should be as shown on the finished picture of the model.

The next part, now I have it all straightened out, is gluing the walls 1 thru 3. I deviated a little, I didn't use the template to align the walls up, I used square blocks, knowing that the walls will be square.



I used some green clamps I bought on Amazon that are used for plants, of all things. The link is here if you would like it. They are only 5 bucks a set. There is a small nib on one side that mates with a small hole on the other, I just filed off the nib so it didn't interfere with clamping. If you get some, you'll know what I mean.
https://www.amazon.com/Gentle-Plant-Flower-Clips-Supporting/dp/B003HNW4HO/ref=sr_1_1?s=lawn-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1483129476&sr=1-1&keywords=plant+clamps



Another thing, don't rely on the blocks as "good to go", it is still easy to move it out if your not careful. Double check the square if you can, on the inside. I have a new square from Woodpeckers "one-time-tool" programme. The 4" works great for this. Also, it is best to glue these walls together on a very flat surface. I have some 1/4" plate glass I use for this.




Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2531 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 12/30/2016 :  4:37:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There you go Tony! That brings me back to this thread in 2014 where we both had found them. http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=43256

Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 16711 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/30/2016 :  5:57:49 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by desertdrover

There you go Tony! That brings me back to this thread in 2014 where we both had found them. http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=43256



Yes indeed, Louis. I remember well. That was when I bought some, has been very handy at times.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2531 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/30/2016 :  6:28:03 PM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Well, I have all the walls up. The instructions state at this time to stop and have a beer. Well, I had one better in mind, a single malt, but Sherry came out with a new one, bailey's with coffee. mmm..mmm..good.

Anyway, between sips here, what I did was a logical set of steps that slightly veered from the instructions. The first thing I did was to glue together the last two walls, #4 and 5. Separately. I test fitted against the plan first, but didn't glue them all at once.


Once dry, which wasn't long, I then glued them to the main structure, carefully, making sure everything was aligned. The corner braces they supplied were a good help, but I didn't need all 3 on 2 corners. They would get in the way of the windows if I used 3 anyway.


Once all that was dry, I added the top brace they suggested, after I turned the structure over in it's rightful position. It was easy to add, and the 2 corner braces gave it added strength and support. I did it afterwards just in case the 2 walls I added wouldn't line up right, this ensured a better fit all around.


One note here before we add the last wall, and go and get a beer (or drink of your choice), wall #6 had a brace going all the way across the top. But there really needed to be about a 1/4" relief on the left side, otherwise it will interfere with the brace on the adjacent wall. And don't forget like I did to put a bevel on the opposite corner. Actually, better done here at this stage than earlier, just to make sure of the bevel angle needed.


I can't lie, it was a tad tricky putting in wall #6, as the wall where it butts to, #4, was a little bowed out, maybe 1/16". So I had to hold one side in when glued, and try to clamp the other side (to #4) at the same time. Then to add a little security, I cut 2 notches in one corner brace I didn't use, and added them as shown here:


So now that wall is in, there should be (I am pretty positive) a gap for some trim later.


And there we have it. And now my Baileys coffee is gone. Time for a re-fill.



Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2531 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/30/2016 :  7:52:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tony, Is there a specific reason you're gluing walls together without the windows & doors installed, or did I miss something?


Country: USA | Posts: 2140 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/31/2016 :  08:04:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Carl B

Tony, Is there a specific reason you're gluing walls together without the windows & doors installed, or did I miss something?



Yes, the instructions suggested to do it afterwards, so in this instance, I am following them. Also if the windows are in as I build the wall, they would get in the way and get damaged with all the tricky assembly, moving parts around, and not to mention, frayed nerves.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2531 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/31/2016 :  08:29:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony,
Thanks for the step- by-step in your build. Looks good so far.
Usually on a four sided structures, I put in a bottom and upper floor to brace and keep everything square. I know it's a lot of wood but if there is any furniture I want to show on the second floor, I need it. With both floors in, my buildings stay together even if I throw them across the room!
In looking at the last picture, how do you go about putting in trim on the edge of the beveled wall? Does the kit provide a special formed piece ?
Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2474 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/31/2016 :  08:38:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
After posting my question, I went back to look, and realize that shouldn't have any trim but if one doesn't sand evenly all the way through from top to bottom of the seam, then paint will not fill any gaps. No wonder they tell you in the instructions to have a beer, so you won't see any imperfections!
Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2474 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 12/31/2016 :  09:21:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tony looks great. Nice way your going through everything to help the next one who build this kit.

Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 9185 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/31/2016 :  09:44:21 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Tony,

It's looking real good. I like how your painting turned out; you have good technique.

What a challenge on the walls, especially with incomplete or inaccurate instructions. Managing to install bracing without later having to do some trimming later can be hard to do. It requires being able to visualize in four dimensions. I usually have to do some trimming. I also add horizontal bracing, which would seem unnecessary, but I do find that walls can cup or bow in subtle ways without it, even the material used for these laser kits. If I really plan ahead I add it where it could provide supports for floors as view blocks.

I find the Bar Mills kits very appealing but none really fit my prototype. Instead I'm happily watching you do the work.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 2273 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/31/2016 :  10:14:43 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Pennman

Tony,
Thanks for the step- by-step in your build. Looks good so far.
Usually on a four sided structures, I put in a bottom and upper floor to brace and keep everything square. I know it's a lot of wood but if there is any furniture I want to show on the second floor, I need it. With both floors in, my buildings stay together even if I throw them across the room!
In looking at the last picture, how do you go about putting in trim on the edge of the beveled wall? Does the kit provide a special formed piece ?
Rich



Thanks Rich. I doubt even on my best well built models, I'll be doing any tossing.

But the trim, as far as what I have seen is no more different than any other corner. If nothing else, I can take a strip and bevel one edge, which I had thought of doing. We'll see.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2531 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/31/2016 :  10:16:00 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TRAINS1941

Tony looks great. Nice way your going through everything to help the next one who build this kit.



Thanks Jerry. Good to know I am doing something right


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2531 Go to Top of Page

Nelson458
Fireman



Posted - 12/31/2016 :  10:25:20 AM  Show Profile  Visit Nelson458's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Tony,

It's looking real good. I like how your painting turned out; you have good technique.

What a challenge on the walls, especially with incomplete or inaccurate instructions. Managing to install bracing without later having to do some trimming later can be hard to do. It requires being able to visualize in four dimensions. I usually have to do some trimming. I also add horizontal bracing, which would seem unnecessary, but I do find that walls can cup or bow in subtle ways without it, even the material used for these laser kits. If I really plan ahead I add it where it could provide supports for floors as view blocks.

I find the Bar Mills kits very appealing but none really fit my prototype. Instead I'm happily watching you do the work.

Mike



Thank you Mike. I will probably add some blocking in later, but a lot of the time, since I spray the window 'glass' with dullcote, it tends to keep that see-thru look to a minimum.

Many a time, I may not have a need or have a place to put a model on a layout, but I still like the kit, or just want to build something different, so I will often build as a stand alone diorama. It would hold ones attention more by itself, than crowded within a lot of other real estate. And if I have an enclose case, it can be kept from the dust too.

I am quite a visual person, to be honest, I can see how things go in my mind before I actually do it. Not just in modeling either, even when I cook an omelet, or a cake, I have everything in my head almost within a minute of what I need, how much and how to prepare. Have always been like that. OK, I may need to have the ingredients to a cake on paper, but I see the process easily.


Tony Burgess
Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

Country: USA | Posts: 2531 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 12/31/2016 :  10:27:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I agree with others before me, great job Tony on your build, and information for other builders of this kit. Your bracing and construction should handle an earthquake magnitude of at least 6.1 to 6.9.

Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

Country: USA | Posts: 16711 Go to Top of Page
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