Railroad Line Forums - TT scale Otter Creek Falls Coal & Lumber Rwy
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 5 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 108 ]  [ Total: 113 ]  [ Newest Member: PMStrains ]
 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Small Scale Model Railroad Forum
 TT scale Otter Creek Falls Coal & Lumber Rwy
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Previous Topic: Nantahala Midland V 3.0 Topic Next Topic: Video update on the mine area
Page: of 11

adrian_batey
Fireman

Posted - 11/05/2015 :  7:01:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit adrian_batey's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looks good mate. No problem at all to push that box car up.


Country: Australia | Posts: 1235 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 11/06/2015 :  11:09:09 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by adrian_batey

Looks good mate. No problem at all to push that box car up.



Thanks Adrian. It'll be easier with a Climax and disconnect log buggies.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 2164 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 11/06/2015 :  11:10:13 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
This post will give the details of what lead up to the video of the SW1200 and boxcar.

This past Monday I received my order of Smooth-On 305 resin casting material.



Mixing of part A and part B to a 1:1 ration in the plastic cups I can cast three section. Approximately 36". I'm using the "squish method" of casting the sections. It's basically filling the mold to over flow and laying a piece of plastic on top with a weight to give a nice smooth even surface on the back of the casting.



When the resin turns white, the 305 takes about 20 minuets to setup for de-molding, you can take the casting out of the mold.



The casting on the left is still in the mold with the piece of plastic on it. The middle one has the plastic top removed and the one on the right has been "carefully" removed from the mold.



All three have been de-molded. Notice the flash that is left on. This can be removed with a sharp hobby knife after the resin has cured for an hour or so.



The castings are the consistency of taffy when first taken out of the mold. Notice how it droops over the mold. Don't let it harden in this position because it will keep it's shape.



After a days casting session I had enough to do the length of run for the climb up the hill.



The resin sections where pinned down using ordinary pins. Also the foam is attached with "T" pins. The reason for this is that I didn't want to glue everything down and then find out it wouldn't work. I didn't want the mess of having rip up glued down foam, cork or track sections. As luck would have it, the designed worked out.



/http://www.kingstonemodelworks.com/TTnut/Diorama/dio-51.JPG



A question was asked about vertical transition. Formulas were give to figure this out. I used common sense and my eye ball to sand the foam to a nice vertical transition.

Top Transition



Bottom Transition



Coupler relationship at top of vertical transition.



Close up shot.



Coupler relationship at bottom of vertical transition.



Close up shot.



A very close up shot of the track sections.



In not wanting to glue anything down permanent I needed a way to hold the code55 track on the track sections. I tried ordinary pins at first and found that the flanges hit the pin heads killing the Angels that were dancing on the head of the pin. What to do? Well, cut the head of the pin of, squeeze a small portion flat and bend at a 90 angle.



Needless to say the Angles were happy.

Here are a couple of pictures with the modified pins holding down the track.





So, what's next. Well it's all going to be disassembled and now glue will be used to permanently glue all the pieces in place. I'm still trying to decide if I will use PC ties or Pliobond to fasten the rail. Perhaps both.

More to come. When can be anybody's guess.

Bernd



Edited by - Bernd on 02/03/2017 08:27:02 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 2164 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 11/06/2015 :  9:37:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Impressive engineering!

Mike

Country: USA | Posts: 12406 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/06/2015 :  10:48:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Can't wait to see all your tedious work on this project come to life Bernd'..As Russ stated, tremendous engineering'...


Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 4695 Go to Top of Page

Jeff G
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/07/2015 :  06:38:28 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bernd: Superb job! I think I have to get some of those heavy weights for my window mold to keep the flashing thin enough to remove. I'm using SmoothCast 300 which sets up very quickly; you have to pour it within 2 minutes or forget it. I might give the 305 a try, now that I got my Dick Blick 40% off coupon!

Cheers.



Country: USA | Posts: 299 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 11/07/2015 :  07:31:39 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks Tyson & Ted for the compliments.

Jeff, I think you'll like the 305. You won't have to rush as fast. Keeps you from yelling obscenities.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 2164 Go to Top of Page

Jeff G
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/07/2015 :  08:11:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nothing keeps me from yelling obscenities; in fact I yell them con gusto when things go right! :)


Country: USA | Posts: 299 Go to Top of Page

lv4142003
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/08/2015 :  9:48:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bernd, have you given any thought to dropping pc ties in the mold (4, maybe 6) to a section, and then soldering the code 55 rail to them?


Country: USA | Posts: 177 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 11/09/2015 :  08:02:06 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by lv4142003

Bernd, have you given any thought to dropping pc ties in the mold (4, maybe 6) to a section, and then soldering the code 55 rail to them?



Mmmmm, now there's a thought. I'll have to give it a try. Thanks for the idea.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 2164 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 11/09/2015 :  11:08:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bernd, More nice track work. I like your pin-to-spike conversion. So, you flat first, then bend.Would that work with thin bronze wire like Tichy offers? I ask because there are a couple places I might want to try something like that for adding feeders to the teack instead of using copper phone wire soldered horizontally to the outside of the rail.


Country: USA | Posts: 1732 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 11/09/2015 :  2:54:25 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Gill

Bernd, More nice track work. I like your pin-to-spike conversion. So, you flat first, then bend.Would that work with thin bronze wire like Tichy offers? I ask because there are a couple places I might want to try something like that for adding feeders to the teack instead of using copper phone wire soldered horizontally to the outside of the rail.



Hi Bill,

Thanks for the kind words.

Yes, I cut the head of the pin off, flatten with a pair of pliers, and then bend the end to 90%. I was thinking of trying the bronze wire next. I have some at present from Tichy. I think it would work very well for your application. I'm going to have to give that a try. Nice idea.

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 2164 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 11/09/2015 :  4:34:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bill Gill asked an interesting question regarding the pin track spikes. He asked if it would work using phosphor bronze wire from Tichy. I just happened to have some .020" dia. wire on hand and made a spike.



Looks pretty good. You can make it any length you want. The interesting part was how that member was going to use the spike. He wanted it long enough to go through the table so he could solder a bus feeder under the layout instead of using telephone cable wire. I think it would work out great. The wire solders easy and you'll hardly notice it soldered to the rail, inside or outside.

And moving right along to the next portion of this post. I received my order of Clover House TT scale ties and turnout ties. With the making of the phosphor bronze spike I made a quick little test section for the wood ties. I want to try out making spikes and spiking the Code55 rail to wood ties. My resin track bed came in very handy for laying out the wood ties.

First some masking tape. Tape it down with the sticky side up.



Next stick down the resin tie strip.



Next add the tie's in between the resin ties.



A 9in. section filled with ties.



Pull up the resin tie strip carefully so you don't pull up any wood ties.



Walla, a 9in. section of tie strips ready to glue down.



I spread some glue on a piece of Styrofoam.



And stuck the ties in the glue using a piec of wood as a straight edge to make sure the ties are in a straight line.



I'll post more once the glue has dried. That'll be tomorrow.

Bernd



Edited by - Bernd on 02/03/2017 12:59:26 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 2164 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 11/10/2015 :  12:23:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
There was much discussion on the grade on MRH forum. Grade discussions can be talked about here. http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46301

Bernd



Country: USA | Posts: 2164 Go to Top of Page

Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 11/12/2015 :  08:49:36 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I'm a day late and a dollar short with posting on experimenting with some track work I promised Tuesday.

The discussion centered around spikes small enough for use in TT to spike Code55 rail to ties. I proposed using pins with cut off heads. A question on Rail Line Forum brought forth the use of phosphor-bronze wire. So I experimented with the wire. Results show .020" dia. wire works good. The use of pins will also work but they are a bit larger in dia.


I use the pins to temporarily hold the track down when using glue, such as Pliobond, until the glue dries. The PB (phosphor bronze) wire I discovered when making spikes is that the head breaks when squeezing the wire flat first and them bending the flat part 90. I had the same problem with the pins. I then bend the wire first and then flatten it to form the spike head. Worked much better on both the pins and the PB wire.



I laid two strips of resin ties on either side of the Clover House wooden ties for an experiment of spiking.



I spiked one tie with a pin and the second tie with PB wire. Note that the tie with the pin split. This can be solved by using a drill first for a pilot hole. The tie spiked with the PB wire didn't split. After forming the head of the spike I used a pair of side cutters at an angle to cut the formed spike. No hole drilling is necessary with the PB wire.



Here are the tools I used. From left to right, Xurcon sprue side cutters, a pair of flat nosed pliers from Michaels in their bead department, needle nose pliers, a second pair of needle nose pliers and the .020" dia. phosphor bronze wire.



The needle nosed pliers have two grooves ground into the jaws at a 90. This helps hold the spike and keep it from twisting while pushing in the spike.



A pair of Xurcon spruce side cutters.



The flat pliers from Michaels from their beading department.



First I make a 90 bend in the wire.





Next I squeeze the wire as close to the pivot as possible because of leverage.





The rough head of the spike.



I trim the end of to shorten it.



Then I cut the spike off at a severe side angle to give it a sharp point.





The spike is placed into the pliers with the two notches.



Hold tightly and push the spike into the wood tie.



And the end result. Also note the two spikes 5 ties further up the picture.



My conclusion is that it's possible to form spikes from .020" phosphor bronze wire. The wire is stiff enough to use in this way. This may seem like a lot of work to spike rail to wooden ties, but I believe the end result is quite good looking. If you are into building a highly detailed layout then this is the way to go. If you are building a layout to operate as soon as possible then this could be a deterrent. But we have to start some where.

As always comments and suggestions are welcome.

Bernd



Edited by - Bernd on 02/03/2017 1:05:40 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 2164 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 11 Previous Topic: Nantahala Midland V 3.0 Topic Next Topic: Video update on the mine area  
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Previous Page | Next Page
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-17 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.39 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000