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Author Previous Topic: Black Bear Logging II Topic Next Topic: My gas mechanical engine broke down!
Page: of 17

kirk
Fireman



Posted - 08/21/2016 :  01:45:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by JimF

Troels,

A delayed Thank You for your reply about the track. Mea culpa.

Though I'm in the US, I have some left from fooling with UK OO, so that will get me started.

I have also, now, finally gone through all 7111 pages of the 7 volumes. Phenomenal is the word that comes to mind. All I can do is echo all the superlatives that have been spoken through all these years.

The only downside to reading all those pages, was noting a few of the suppliers who either are no longer in business, or no longer (at least, looking at their websites) produce some of the excellent items you have put to such fantastic use.

Finally, is your video colors DVD still available?

Cheers.

Jim F



Thank you for the kind words Jim!

The DVD is sold out... sorry. I guess I'll have to find some sort of download/streaming solution.



Troels Kirk
Näsum, Sweden

Country: Sweden | Posts: 4873 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/21/2016 :  10:05:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

Troels,
I'm enjoying going back to some of your older builds to see different coloring on many of your structures. I especially admire your talent to be able to recreate real life in miniature. Thank you for many "lessons ".
Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2453 Go to Top of Page

kirk
Fireman



Posted - 08/21/2016 :  1:22:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Slight progress... I have assembled and painted a small Duncan Models wall mounted crane for the stone lifting :)

A distance shot of the still test fitted structure shows how well it catches the eye and fills the middle ground to the right of the lighthouse.





Troels Kirk
Näsum, Sweden

Country: Sweden | Posts: 4873 Go to Top of Page

masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 08/21/2016 :  1:41:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I too haven't checked in for awhile! Fantastic to see you back modeling Troels!

Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1494 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 08/21/2016 :  2:20:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's really interesting. Your lighthouse is so fantastic but I really have to fight to keep my eye on it as it wants to go to your new structure or the white one that is partially hidden by the light house.

It's Only Make Believe

Bob Harris

Country: USA | Posts: 4098 Go to Top of Page

Terrell
Crew Chief



Posted - 08/21/2016 :  4:15:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Beautiful work! The new building fits perfectly.


Country: | Posts: 890 Go to Top of Page

David J Buchholz
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/21/2016 :  6:52:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm probably not the only one on this forum who just found a new "background" pic for my computer courtesy of Mr. Kirk.

Just sensational.... as always.


Best regards, Dave



Edited by - David J Buchholz on 08/21/2016 6:59:04 PM

Country: | Posts: 301 Go to Top of Page

rca2
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/21/2016 :  7:58:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by kirk

...A distance shot of the still test fitted structure shows how well it catches the eye and fills the middle ground to the right of the lighthouse....


Ah! Now we see your intent. For most of us it is difficult to keep the whole composition in mind while we work on its parts.

That brings a question to mind, Troels. Do you compose to optimize the view from a particular spot in the room or do you compromise to provide for good views from multiple spots in the room?

I am building a double-deck around the walls layout with 32" and 52" deck heights. My primary design goal is to have the scenery look good to train operators walking along the upper deck and seated operators along the lower deck. At the same time I want the layout to have a great first impression to visitors entering the room. The room is 19' x 19' so those distances are quite far in comparison. The signature scene is well placed on the wall opposite the entrance.

Like almost everyone, I started designing with a track plan, thinking scenery is the last thing I would do. When it came time to start construction, however, I realized that I need to paint the backdrops before I lay any track or build the upper deck shelf. Ironic.

Thanks for sharing. Even your trains are "scenic." Bob.


Modeling Arizona Eastern Railroad, Hayden Junction (1920), in On30

Country: USA | Posts: 409 Go to Top of Page

JimF
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/21/2016 :  8:00:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,

The problem is that there are so many excellent pictures. I can't decide on one, so let about a dozen play as a slide show.

Jim F



Country: USA | Posts: 183 Go to Top of Page

David J Buchholz
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/21/2016 :  10:00:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
All I'm saying is it's a good thing that lighthouse picture isn't porn.


Country: | Posts: 301 Go to Top of Page

kirk
Fireman



Posted - 08/22/2016 :  12:49:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rca2

quote:
Originally posted by kirk

...A distance shot of the still test fitted structure shows how well it catches the eye and fills the middle ground to the right of the lighthouse....


Ah! Now we see your intent. For most of us it is difficult to keep the whole composition in mind while we work on its parts.

That brings a question to mind, Troels. Do you compose to optimize the view from a particular spot in the room or do you compromise to provide for good views from multiple spots in the room?



I had the great advantage of designing the appearance of the railroad on paper before I began building. The track plan came afterwards.

I designed the railroad as if seen from a boat on the sea, with the main features more visible than the rest. I made the really important parts physically protrude from the rest of the layout, on three peninsulas. The lighthouse is one, the Convers Harbor next, and the biggest, the Cranberry Wharf (the paper mill peninsula was an afterthought, but designed to the same principles). Then I framed these places with leading lines, both tracks, scenery and structures, to contain the eye in that area, no matter from which angle it is viewed. The three main scenes are then separated with sectors of greenery, trees and the two rivers with bridges(the same for the paper mill later). The main attractions have tall features to mark their place: the lighthouse of course, the sailboat mast and the hotel on a hill for Convers, the crane, smokestacks masts and a bell tower for Cranberry. On the paper mill the chimney and main building. All other structures are lower and less visible.

I then ran a railway through it :)



Troels Kirk
Näsum, Sweden

Edited by - kirk on 08/22/2016 12:50:36 AM

Country: Sweden | Posts: 4873 Go to Top of Page

brucet
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/22/2016 :  01:43:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Troels IMHO one of the reasons your layout works so well is the 'space'. Unfortunately we, me included, try to fit too much into our limited space. And unless you are modeling downtown there is always 'space'. Watching your layout evolve through these, and other, web sites has been an inspiration for me. And I'm sure many others. Photos are great. But reading your reasoning and logic is just as interesting.
Thanks for the inspiration.

Bruce



Country: Australia | Posts: 153 Go to Top of Page

rca2
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/22/2016 :  04:00:36 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Troels, Thank you for the explanation. I just took a short look at your first pages with the concept sketches, looking for the points you made.

You have already taught me that I need to start by considering the scene as a whole rather than make some structures and then figure out where to place them on the layout. Looking at the most recent lighthouse picture, I think I need to rethink the purpose of clouds in my backdrop before I start painting. Bob.


Modeling Arizona Eastern Railroad, Hayden Junction (1920), in On30

Edited by - rca2 on 08/22/2016 04:02:29 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 409 Go to Top of Page

rca2
Engine Wiper

Posted - 08/24/2016 :  2:03:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Troels, I am going to learn how to paint an acrylic background by doing it (about 90 feet of mural should provide a lot of instruction). Essentially this is a mountain railroad running in a river valley. I have a mix of close hillside and long distance views. Some views are just sky. I already picked out photos to use as references and identified the signature structures. Would it also help a beginner if I made rough mockups of the focal point/signature structure placed in front of the backdrop for reference?

I tried sketching what I thought was the simplest scene. It was very crude, but also not well composed, which convinced me that sketching is important to planning. I am also convinced that you don't need to be an artist to get value from the process. Thanks again for sharing. Bob.


Modeling Arizona Eastern Railroad, Hayden Junction (1920), in On30

Edited by - rca2 on 08/24/2016 2:05:28 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 409 Go to Top of Page

kirk
Fireman



Posted - 08/24/2016 :  3:23:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by rca2

Troels, I am going to learn how to paint an acrylic background by doing it (about 90 feet of mural should provide a lot of instruction). Essentially this is a mountain railroad running in a river valley. I have a mix of close hillside and long distance views. Some views are just sky. I already picked out photos to use as references and identified the signature structures. Would it also help a beginner if I made rough mockups of the focal point/signature structure placed in front of the backdrop for reference?

I tried sketching what I thought was the simplest scene. It was very crude, but also not well composed, which convinced me that sketching is important to planning. I am also convinced that you don't need to be an artist to get value from the process. Thanks again for sharing. Bob.



Hello Bob,

The most important thing to avoid when painting backgrounds is buildings in perspective. Face on, end on, but never at an angle, since this only works from a single viewpoint. Als think about how hills and clouds will look when seen at an angle from further down the layout. Keep it as simple as possible. A slight grade in a blue sky, darkest up high. And keep everything much lighter than you'd imagine! Both because acrylics dry darker (especially cheap ones), and because a lighr sky and scenery will suggest distance and depth. Never mix your sky blue with anything other than white, unless you are attempting an evening or morning sky. A the most important of all is to observe the real thing, not in photos or other modeller's painted backdrops, but out in the fresh air!!!!

Mock-ups are a great help!


Have great fun!


Troels Kirk
Näsum, Sweden

Edited by - kirk on 08/24/2016 3:24:59 PM

Country: Sweden | Posts: 4873 Go to Top of Page
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