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 New York Mill - Modeled in Balsa Foam
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Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 01/16/2016 :  3:28:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kris-

Making my own tool holders (copying yours) is a back burner project for me.

But when I do get them done, I'll try to remember to post a pic.



Country: USA | Posts: 2173 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/16/2016 :  10:18:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
looks real good Kris'..That is one heck of a roof'. So, what is your finial analysis of working and building with the Balsa Foam'..



Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 4514 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 01/16/2016 :  10:28:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Kris, nice to see that you found some time to update us with this project.
The roof looks great! I would imagine that you would see more rust coloured streaking below the wheel house, from it's rusted metal roof.
Perhaps you are still planning on doing that, just a little further down this build road.
Best of luck with your upcoming surgery, and with your move.
I hope your new home has a real sweet modeling room.

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 6970 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/16/2016 :  11:03:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Greg. Your are correct in your assumption about the addition of future rusting. I need to get the flue in place prior to doing the weathering so that I know where the water will be running on the roof. I'm also considering placing a few corrugated metal panels under the flue to limit the water abuse on the roofing paper. I just need to 'get' there to see how it will work. And thanks for the advance on the 'get well' wishes.

Ted, still trying out new things with the balsa foam.... So stay tuned... But to answer your question... The balsa foam is simply a fantastic medium to work with. It's easy to get 'hooked' on the material for modeling. IMO, balsa foam should be in every modelers repertoire along with wood, styrene and wire.

The hands-on balsa foam clinics I have given have had most attendees leaving the clinic shaking their heads in amazement. Folks are dumbfounded at how easy the foam is to shape, carve and how versatile the medium is. Many clinic attendees also say that they will be moving away from plaster in favor of the foam for future projects. Reference the 3 comments by Jeff (jeyjey) on page 12 as an example of how the balsa foam can impress the modeler with just one project.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 01/16/2016 11:25:02 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7010 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/16/2016 :  11:16:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's great Kris'. I have a piece that I've been waiting to try out. I will recall your enthusiasm as start working with it, and looking forward to the results'.


Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 4514 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/16/2016 :  11:57:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris,

My good wishes to your health as well. I wasn't aware you were having an upcoming surgery. Good luck with all.
I am still wondering how Balsa foam would be better than hydrocal. Lighter I suppose. I am careful with my castings, but as much as I like stone, real looking to prototype, one would need a heavy-duty railroad bench when starting a layout using hydrocal.
You have done a fine job with this model. Looking forward to the finish.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2532 Go to Top of Page

Ray Dunakin
Fireman



Posted - 01/17/2016 :  12:27:29 AM  Show Profile  Visit Ray Dunakin's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Nice work! Good luck with the move, and especially the surgery!


Country: USA | Posts: 3028 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/17/2016 :  10:07:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
[quote]Originally posted by hon3_rr

Thanks all for the encouragement. I appreciate the comments. I also wanted to invite Carl to post a pic or two of his homemade tool caddy. Always fun to see others workbenches.

Kris,

While searching for something this morning, I ran across an old thread about workbenches from various modelers. Thought you'd like to see them. Perhaps others would too.

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=15328

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2532 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/29/2016 :  5:54:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Rich. It's always great to see how others are 'doing it'.

Let's continue with a brief update on the roofing process.

Applying the roofing paper: Continued from previous page.
8) Continue to lay one or two rows of paper at a work setting, allowing the roof to dry while under weight prior to adding the next rows. This is to minimize the warping of the sub-roof matte board. I did not correctly anticipate the amount of warping I experienced with this large roof. A better selection for the sub-roof this size would probably be .040 thick styrene sheet. (Actual sub-roof size is approx. 15x11 inches.)


The above picture shows the roof drying under weight after the application of two rows of asphalt paper.

9) Continue to apply the roofing paper until the entire roof is completed. Allow the roofing paper to fully dry prior to proceeding to the next step.
10) Using MikeC's #8 ink stain, color any exposed sub-roof areas. This may take a couple of applications to fully color the sub-roof. Note that the ink wash will wick under the roofing paper. While the roofing paper is still damp, use the chalk rag as a pounce bag and further blend the coloring of the roofing. (Remember the pounce bag from your junior high school drafting class?)
11) Note that after about 1/2 of the roof was completed, the chalk rag started to 'run dry' and very little dust was being applied. Apply additional finely ground pastels to the rag and work the chalk dust into the rag. Dependent on how much chalk dust/scrapings are added to the rag, it may be necessary to 'refresh' the rag a third time during the roofing process. As an alternative to ground-up or finely scraped pastels, a weathering powder, such as Bragdon's, could be lightly applied to the rag. It is important that not too much weathering powder be applied as weathering powders are somewhat difficult to control once applied to the roof surface. I used very light/small amounts which were widely dispersed onto the chalk rag of Bragdon's FF-66 Dust Bowl Brown, FF-68 Ash and FF-64 Soot Black.
12) Trim the excess asphalt roofing material from the roof. Use a drafting triangle held against the sub-roof to provide a consistent overhang width. Do not trim the asphalt paper even with the sub-roof as a 2 inch wide fascia board will be added later. I used a #18 blade and a guillotine type slice to remove excess roofing paper. The flat surface of the blade was pressed against the triangle which was held against the sub-roof. The cut was made on a cutting mat, not a hard surface, to prevent accidental shifting of the roof during the cutting process.
13) Determine from the plans where the two stacks will sit/exit the roof. Drill a small pilot hole for each stack. These pilot holes will assist you in making sure that bracing added to the sub-roof will not interfere with the instillation of the stacks later.


Note the warping of the roof. This was greater than expected. The picture also shows the trimmed and primary weathering of the roofing paper.

Apply the sub-roof bracing:
Materials:
A) 1/8 inch square or larger stripwood (2 pc - 24 inch length) http://kapplerusa.com/y2k/p-dim.htm
1) Place the roof upside down on a flat surface and place the wall assembly on top.
2) Align the roof to the wall assembly so that there is equal amounts of roof extending past the walls on all sides.
3) Use a pencil to create guide lines on the inside of the wall assembly. These guidelines will be preliminary bracing points for the sub-roof.
4) Cut the bracing stock to size and test fit.
5) Glue the bracing stock to the sub-roof making sure the stacks pilot holes are given plenty of room. I used a yellow glue as I did not want any moisture to affect the glue bond. The sub-roof will be painted and the moisture from the paint, or natural humidity, could affect the bond of a white glue.
6) With the roof still upside down on a large flat surface, place a large flat surface on top of the bracing strips and weigh down. Allow this to dry. If your warping is bad enough, the application of the bracing may need to be completed in a couple of steps. This may be easier than fighting the warp and trying to glue all the bracing in place at one setting. The multiple step approach is the option I used. I used glass plates with additional weights to flatten the roof while the yellow glue dried/cured.




The above pictures show the 'flat' roof sitting on top of the structure. Love adding the 'lid' to the structures to get a feel for how they will really appear.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 01/30/2016 1:57:15 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7010 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/29/2016 :  6:25:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris glad you got the warp out of it. That looks perfect. Great coloring and wear and tear perfect.

Excellent job my friend.


Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 9314 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/29/2016 :  7:13:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice old weathered look on the roof, Kris. Nice to see you got it all straightened out.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 13794 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 01/29/2016 :  7:31:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris, that roof was as warped, as my sense of humor is.
Glad to see that you straightened it out.
Your roof that is, and not my sense of humor.

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 6970 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/29/2016 :  10:19:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris,

"Let's continue with a brief update on the roofing process.",

You call that "brief"...jeeze..you type and show more on one post than I did in an entire thread build. Very informative and functional. I think it would be a great time had by all to attend any clinic you provide. Excellent tutorial.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2532 Go to Top of Page

dallas_m
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/29/2016 :  11:04:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's looking GREAT! Best wishes to you.

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!

Country: USA | Posts: 4674 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/30/2016 :  02:27:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I posted the following comment on the durability of Balsa Foam on Ray Dunakin's thread titled "In-ko-pah RR: The Dos Manos Depot", page 12. http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46006. Since this build is focused on Balsa Foam and it's properties, I felt that the comment should also be included in this thread.

Balsa Foam Durability Reviewed:
I have found that Balsa Foam is pretty durable once it is sealed with something like acrylic Gesso. I use full strength acrylic Gesso over the carved foam prior to coloring the carved foam. I've had the walls of my mill structure at two NMRA Division clinics and a RR show. The walls are composed of both foam densities, Type I or soft and Type II or dense foam. My comment is that even though the completed walls (walls glued together) have been passed around and handled by easily over 200 folks, I have not been able to discern any wall damage or issues with coloring or rock chipping due to the handling. But, unlike the Sintra, I don't think the Balsa Foam would do well in a garden (outdoors) railroad setting.

I would also like to note that the wood components attached to Balsa Foam have remained properly glued in place with the exception of a single board from one of the ore chutes, which was easily glued back into place. Remember, each ore chute has 11 individual pieces of stripwood which were just edge glued or tacked into place. Thus the failure of a single piece is very acceptable considering the volume of handling the wall assembly has endured.

If you review the early entries of this thread, you will find that I was very concerned about the durability of the foam, damage to the foam from handling and the ability to have a component, like wood, remain firmly in place due to the 'sandy' nature of the foam. These concerns have now been put to rest by the excellent performance of the Balsa Foam medium. The material continues to out-perform my wildest expectations of the product.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 01/30/2016 02:57:39 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7010 Go to Top of Page
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