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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/05/2016 :  4:30:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The way I did my last 'roofing paper' installation was to lay down a thick coat of (craft) paint, then lay the paper on top. Any small wrinkles I got actually added to the overall effect! Then paint on top of the paper until the color was right, and finishing with weathering powders/pigments.

I did this on a freight car roof (simulating a canvas roof, common in the 19th/early 20th century), and was very happy with the results. And, of course, you can't beat the price of phone book paper :-)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6306 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/07/2016 :  8:27:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mill Roofing
The mill roof is next in the construction queue. I wanted to note that all of my work on the roofing is done on a glass plate. This allows me to easily remove the excess coloring solutions from the work area. It also helps in trying to keep the backing paper used flat when applying the roofing tissue.

I need to also note that this sequence of construction steps does not include the work I have done in the background working only with archival tissue to create the roofing paper. I’ll share those techniques and materials in a later posting. Instead, the method here is a composite of a couple of techniques used to create roofing paper. As shown by the ‘options’ below, the method I’m using is not unique.

Options for Roofing Paper Material:
It is common to use a single ply of tissue (Kleenex) paper or some other very thin paper such as paper from a phone book or Masking Tape. The Kleenex tissue or phone book paper can be cut into strips and then painted into place on the roof, the paint acting as glue. Simply paint the Masking Tape after application if a tape medium is used.

A second common roofing paper application is the use of a commercial printed paper product. Several companies offer commercial roofing papers. A few are noted below, but the list is not comprehensive in any way.
i. Rusty Stumps Scale Models http://rustystumps.com
ii. Builders In Scale http://www.builders-in-scale.com/bis/parts-tar.html
iii. Doctor Ben’s (Debenllc Publications & Products) http://www.debenllc.com/-Peel-n-Stik-Pitch-Tarpaper-Red-Oxide-Doctor-Bens_p_148.html
iv. Laser-Art Structures http://www.branchline-trains.com

Roofing Goals:
I must first admit that the New York Mill probably had a corrugated metal roof during most of its life. Corrugated roofing was common on structures such as this. But due to the large surface area and the desire to have multiple roofing materials used on my model structures, I exercised some modeler’s license and decided to construct a tar paper roof.

I wanted to have a fairly large amount of detail, both in texture and in coloring, of the roofing paper. This is due to the fact that structure’s roof is often the first component of a structure which a viewer of a model observes. So keeping the large flat surface interesting to the eye is important in this model. I also wanted the paper edges to show some uneven wear from the harsh Colorado weather to further add a bit of visual interest.

To accomplish my goals of having a worn but textured roof, with above average visual interest, I chose to use a common ‘old school’ technique to produce my own asphalt roofing. The method is to basically apply a backing sheet to the texture surface face which will help hold the ‘worn’ shaped edges and produce a pronounced edge, thus enhancing the ragged edges cut into the paper sheet.

Materials:
A) Cheap lightweight drawing paper or blank newsprint paper (backing paper)
B) Golden Fluid Acrylics:
-- a. Carbon Black #2040-4
-- b. Zinc White #2415-4
-- c. Quinacridone Nickel Azo Gold #2301-S
-- d. Phthalo Green (Yellow Shade) #2275-4 (optional)
-- e. Yellow Oxide #2410-4 (optional)
(Note: The selection of Zinc White over a Titanium White acrylic may be a better choice for this application. Zinc white is a translucent white where the Titanium is more opaque. Opaque coloring will be achieved via soft pastels.)
C) Archival Tissue Paper (found at art stores. Cost is about 26 cents per 2x3 foot sheet.)
D) Rembrandt Soft Pastels
-- a. Burnt Umber #409.7
-- b. Yellow Ochre #227.3
-- c. Burnt Sienna #411.5
E) Schmincke Soft Pastel - Neutral Grey #098 075K
F) Bragdon Weathering Powders (optional) http://www.bragdonent.com/smpic/item4.htm
-- a. FF-66 Dust Bowl Brown
-- b. FF-68 Ash
-- c. FF-64 Soot Black
G) Charcoal Pencil (General’s #557-6b Ex. Soft is what I used)
H) Prismacolor Markers
--a.) Black #PM-98
--b.) French Grey 50% #PM-159
--c.) French Grey 40% #PM-158 (optional)
--d.) Sand #PM-70
--e.) Sepia #PM-62 (optional)
I) Silverwood
J) MikeC's #8 Ink Wash ( http://rustystumps.com/RSSMDownloads/Inking%20Stripwood.pdf Thanks Walt!)
K) Sepia Ink wash (use any non-waterproof reddish-brown colored ink in ETOH dilution.)
L) Scale and dimensional stripwood
--a.) 1/8 inch square or larger stripwood. (Sub-roof bracing material. 2-pc 24 inch inch length.) http://kapplerusa.com/y2k/p-dim.htm
--b.) HO Scale 2x6 (5 pc - 12 inch length) http://www.kapplerusa.com/y2k/p-ho-12.htm
M) Delta Ceramcoat Burnt Umber #02025
N) Painter's Masking Tape 1" wide
O) Weather-It (optional)

Make roofing paper:
In a small jar or container with a lid, make a mix of black and white acrylic paints along with water to create a dark grey wash. Remember to go with the lighter rather than darker tinted wash when you get close to the grey you desire.
1) Add a very small amount (at most two drops of the Nickel Azo Gold to the grey wash for a container the size of a small baby food jar.) Mix thoroughly.
2a) Optional: Use the Phthalo Green and/or Yellow Oxide to further color the wash to the desired hue(s). If the structure is to be in a wet setting such as a sea coast or moist NW forest, add the green. If more of a dry climate, try adding a bit of the Yellow Oxide. You could also use these as your primary colors instead of the Black to obtain a different colored asphalt paper. Green and red were also common colors of tar paper.
2. Cut the archival tissue paper slightly larger than the size of the backing sheet of paper.
3. Use a 1-inch wide sponge brush to paint the tissue paper onto the backing paper sheet. Work to keep the tissue smooth by applying lots of wash on the brush and using a light touch of the brush to apply the wash. If the brush is too dry, it will tend to pick-up, bunch-up or rip the tissue paper. The paint will puddle in places which is OK. Allow to dry.


Color the roofing paper:
1) Using the flat end of the pastel, draw random lines on the roofing sheet stock. Draw the lines in only one direction on the sheet stock. The lines will need to be drawn at 90 degrees to the planned cutting of the stock into the roofing strips.
2) Use a cotton rag (Like an old wash cloth. We’ll call this the ‘chalk rag’ henceforth) to rub excess chalk from the from the roofing paper stock. Rub in only one direction, that direction being 90 degrees to the planned cutting of the roofing strips. Use heavy pressure if needed to remove excess chalk.
3) Repeat the above coloring steps using the Yellow Ochre.
4) Repeat the above coloring steps using the Burnt Sienna.
5) Create heavy lines of color stripes with the Schmincke Grey pastel. Try to crumble the pastel onto the roofing stock at random using a knife to scrape bits of pastel from the stick. Lightly rub the crumbled bit of pastel with the chalk rag to create light lines with feathered edges. Again, only rub in the one plane when creating the lines of pastel color on the roofing stock.

Cut the roofing strips:
1) Make a scale 4 foot wide marking guide from a strip of matte board or other material. (I errored and cut 3 foot wide strips making the strips a bit more difficult to enhance, handle and place correctly.)
2) Use the marking guide on the back of the colored tar paper stock to mark cutting guidelines. Mark the guidelines using a pencil, not an ink pen. (Ink will run in latter steps.) Make sure that the cutting guidelines create strips of paper going across the grey streaks on the opposite side of the roofing paper stock.
3) Use a metal straight edge held over the cutting guidelines and a **new** razor blade to cut the roofing paper stock into strips.

Enhance roofing strips with seams and tar lines:
1) Use a lined grid to assist in keeping free drawn tar lines vertical. It is not necessary, or desired, that the vertically drawn seams be totally vertical, but try to avoid a consistent slant in your seams. Draw random seam lines in the paper stock strip after reviewing the noted suggestions below. Try to keep the paper roll length less than a scale 6 foot between seam lines. Most of my ‘roll lengths’ are a scale 4 to 5 foot in my stock strips.

The use of two different media tools, Prismacolor markers and charcoal pencils, allows one to obtain slightly different seam effects and coloring of the rolled roofing. Please review the entry on page 17 of this thread for additional information.

With the charcoal pencil one can achieve very fine lines. These lines can become very realistic when one uses the charcoal pencil to highlight the folds of the tissue paper. One can also fade/feather the line a bit by pulling the charcoal to one side of the seam by rubbing with a finger or chalk rag with moderate pressure.

If desired, Prismacolor pencils may be used to add additional coloring to the roofing paper strips. Patches of color can be added by lightly shading areas with a pencil. This shaded area can be blended using a ‘Blender’ pencil. The blender pencil melts the pigments in the colored area to create a colored area with faded/feathered edges. Sometimes shading the area next to a seam can create excellent visual effects.

Keep the charcoal pencil very sharp when drawing seam lines. Use light strokes of the pencil to keep drawn seam lines thin.

When drawing seam lines, look carefully at the paper strip. The strip stock will provide natural break points which to use to draw seam lines. Don’t try to be perfect in strip lengths as random lengths will probably produce a more natural looking roof. Use the natural lines found in the paper strip formed by the streaks of pastels, creases of paper and the subtle, and not so subtle, color changes of the base acrylics used to color the paper. On the vertical crease lines in the paper, try to color only the top edge of the crease with charcoal using a light touch. You may need a couple of passes to color the crease. This will provide a very fine line with a strong 3-D effect. It is usually enhanced by the lighter pastels coloring trapped by the folds in the paper.

2) Separate out about ¼ to 1/3rd of the long strip stocks to add additional detailing to the long bottom edge seam to indicate torn and worn roofing. For a more worn roof, use more strip stock. For a newer or well-maintained look, use less strips.
3) Use a swivel knife ( http://www2.fiskars.com/Products/Crafting-and-Sewing/Craft-Knives-and-Blades/Swivel-Detail-Knife ) and **new blade** to cut various angles and cures into only the exposed edge of a strip stock. Cut the edge so that the width of the roofing is different between seams.

Creating different widths of roofing can be accomplished by cutting curves and angles into the edge or by using a straight edge and removing a very thin strip of paper from between the seam lines, providing different widths of roofing paper. Again, make these cuts only along the exposed edge of the roofing paper.

When making paper of random widths, make sure to make square edges/cuts on the inside of the two seam lines forming the length of tar paper. This is to insure that only that piece of paper was a single roll of paper that width used in that run.
4) At random points on the exposed edge , use a #11 blade point to create torn edges. Stick the blade point through the paper about 1/16th of an inch for the exposed edge and twist the blade in a circular motion. Use the point of the blade to pull out the paper from the cut, leaving a small torn out section of paper along the edge. This technique works best on a cutting mat.
5) Continue to use the swivel knife to cut very thin edges of paper and small jagged edges in the exposed bottom edge of the paper roofing. Keep in mind that if the paper is cut too far up, there will not be enough paper remaining to overlap the roofing. This will result in having some sub-roofing exposed.
6) –Optional-- To obtain a very ragged/torn edge of roofing paper, more like torn felt paper backing, one can use wire or nylon scratch brushes to wear down the paper edge. I did not use this technique on this model as I think it only displays well in S or O scales. Reference this thread for pictures and additional information on this technique. http://www.railroad-line.com/discussion/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=26900&whichpage=26


Above picture is example of O-scale weathered roofing using scratch/wire brush. Note the edges of the roofing material.

7) Add additional shadow effect to the seams. This can be done using either the charcoal pencil or a marker. Heck, you can even combine the two. I did this in a few places, coloring the seam with the pencil after the roofing strip was mounted.

In general, it is easiest to color the exposed worn edges and vertical seams using the Prismacolor ink marker. Use the broad tip of the marker for the following technique. You will achieve a subtle enhancement of the shadow/rotting edge seam if the thin strips to form the rough edge were left in place at random during the cutting process. Removing the waste paper after the coloring process will provide a wider ink weep along the cut edge providing a bit more ‘tar’ showing at the seam line.
8) Place the paper stock strip, tissue face down, on a piece of folded paper towel.
9) Using the broad tip of the Prismacolor ink marker, slowly draw the marker across the cut edge. The tip of the marker should be on both the paper towel and the paper roofing strip as the marker is drawn across the edge. By slowly drawing the marker tip across the edge, some ink will be deposited on the paper towel and weep onto the face of the roofing paper. The paper towel and speed at which the marker tip is moved will allow you to control how much ink is weeping onto the face of the roofing paper. The process will also highlight the rough edges created in the paper strip and color any edge of the backing paper. Make sure to pull the roofing stock away from the paper towel as the ink in the paper towel will get deposited on the roofing paper if the paper is moved across or comes in contact with the ink line in the paper towel.
10) Another ‘seam‘ fade technique is to use a dark watercolor or ink, like a Paynes Grey color, and apply a small drop of fluid to the backside of the roof paper strip, just to one side of the seam line. Let the paper become moist and then wick up any excess fluid with a small corner of paper towel. Flip the roofing strip over and place the paper towel next to the seam line and press, holding the towel down for approximately 20 seconds. This is to transfer some of the fluid to the tissue from the paper towel. This will result in a fade to a fairly large area instead of a thin line. Note that simply working from the front will result in a blotch, usually with strong edges. By getting the paper moist from the back side the strong edges are feathered and the oversized blotch is contained.
11) Color the long ‘exposed’ edges of the balance of the strip stock which was not cut to represent different widths or worn edge seams.
12) If it has not been completed, draw simulated vertical seam lines on the remaining paper strip stock.
13) Cut the roofing stock strips into shorter strips, about 4 inches in length. This is to allow for ease of handling while mounting the simulated asphalt roofing rolls to the sub-roof. Use a swivel knife to cut along the vertical charcoal lines, trying to splitting the charcoal line with the cut.
14) Once you have cut the long stock strip into smaller length strips, color the cut vertical edges using the black Prismacolor marker and folded paper towel. Use the technique described earlier to color the paper edge from the backside.

The following picture show the results of the described techniques. Note the top three stips of paper shown. The top is just a cut strip of roofing stock. The middle strip does not have the enhanced cut edges but does have seams drawn into the strip. The bottom strip shows the effect of cutting the long seam to represent individual lengths of rolled roofing which has worn.


This final picture is a close-up of the three roofing strips to provide a feel for the coloring and texture captured using the materials and techniques described.



I'll be posting the roofing sequence soon.

Questions and comments are always welcome. Thanks in advance.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 01/31/2016 7:27:11 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7010 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 01/07/2016 :  8:45:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris, you should be given a special RRLines award, for having the best explained lessons anyone could ever ask for!
You cover all of the materials needed you explain each and every step.
And your photo's are always top notch!
Nobody does it better than you my friend!

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 6970 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/07/2016 :  9:32:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It appears to me that Paper Creek is back in business! Nice tarpaper and book on how it's done! EXCELLENT, how do you find the time to model after typing so much? Perhaps your left brain is typing while your right brain is building.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2532 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 01/08/2016 :  09:17:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, what Greg & Rich said, very complete descriptions accompanied by photos that clearly show what is described, great combination.


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TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/08/2016 :  09:57:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just an exceptional tutorial Kris.

So much great information that you pass along to all of us.


Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 9314 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/08/2016 :  11:21:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you Gentlemen for the kind words and encouragement. I just hope a few folks find value in all of this. I do, however, enjoy sharing the information.

Rich... hope the nose is better today and your on the mend. In response to your question, I actually spend about 3 times the amount of time constructing, posting and reviewing/editing my comments over the amount of actual modeling time. I could get in a lot more time at the bench if I go to a format which is less 'formal' and just 'put the info out there'. But I actually enjoy the writing process, so I'll stick with it. I've been working for a long time to find a format which works for readers when following my construction sequences. I think I've finally found it. We'll see. But again, I appreciate the positive feedback and complements. Thank you.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 01/08/2016 11:31:27 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7010 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 01/08/2016 :  11:32:24 AM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi Kris, Nice work.

Noticed in your bench photo your tool "holders" and such.

They appear to be blocks of wood with large holes drilled in them.

If so, I'd like to copy that for myself...what are your dimensions?



Country: USA | Posts: 2173 Go to Top of Page

hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/08/2016 :  11:49:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Carl and thanks for checking in.

Actually, the three tool holders are a commercial product. I also use a simple 'cracker holder' which has some dense foam in one side to hold my 'sharps'. That way I don't have to ever reach across any blade edges.

The tool holder is this product. Would be simple to make from wood however. Would be a shop class 101 project.
http://www.micromark.com/tool-organizer,7035.html

Measurements of the holder:
Each row is approx. 1 inch wide. Row heights are 2.5 inches, 4 inch and 5 inch. Footprint is 3x6 inches.

The 'cracker holder' is visible above the three Choppers in the picture below. Sharps on one side in the foam and a few fluids, eyedroppers and bits in the opposing side. Again, a shop class 101 project.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 01/08/2016 12:01:47 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7010 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/08/2016 :  12:03:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Some of my favorite tool holders. At the bottom left, that holder works great for my mechanical pencils (.3mm lead) and a couple micro-brushes. The next one holds regular sized paintbrushes. These two came from a set I bought at Container Store, designed for bathrooms to hold makeup brushes, etc. The brush holder had a problem where there wasn't enough gluing surface for the double sided tape to hold, so I added a piece of aluminum 1" L leftover from another project. This provides more glue surface and holds it more firmly to the table.


The white block has holes for various size X-Acto knives and also for 'needle sticks'/awls. This is 1 1/2" square cut to length, with holes from a drill press. Note, though, there's a slot cut on the left hand side for a C Clamp that holds this firmly on the table. There's a little strip of magnet on the front that can hold a single-edged razor blade firmly in place.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6306 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 01/10/2016 :  07:59:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kris and Dave, thanks for the info on the tool holders. Have to build up something!



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TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/15/2016 :  1:52:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just thought I'd get this going again. I know Kris is getting ready to move.

But maybe he has one last update before the move!!


Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 9314 Go to Top of Page

jeyjey
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/15/2016 :  2:19:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great stuff, Kris!

Modelling the D&RGW and C&S in HOn3.

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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/16/2016 :  2:41:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks all for the encouragement. I appreciate the comments. I also wanted to invite Carl to post a pic or two of his homemade tool caddy. Always fun to see others workbenches.

Well, time to get an update out. Been a bit delinquent in my postings. I need to note that updates may be a bit spotty for the next couple of months as I have a large abdominal hernia and corrective surgery upcoming, and to add to that, we just sold our place. So I'll be 'supervising' the movers into our new place once we find it and get closed. One of the goals is a new 'studio' for my modeling, so I'll also have to have some time to get 'set-up' again prior to any benchwork sessions.

Applying the roofing paper:
I have not yet completed the roofing paper application, so this is only a partial update on the process. I'm currently about 60% completed with the roofing paper application.

**Hint** During the roofing paper application process, keep a damp rag, **not** the chalk rag, by the work area to wipe excess glue from fingers and tools.
1) Apply a Silverwood wash to the sub-roof board. Allow this to dry and then repeat the process. Use a 1-inch sponge brush to apply the wash. This will provide a silver-grey tone to any exposed sub-roof which might be viewed due to worn roofing paper.
2) Making sure to keep your guide lines on the sub-roof board horizontal (read: check constantly) is one of the major keys and more difficult tasks to the roofing process. Draw guide lines on the sub-roof as you are applying each horizontal row across the roof. This will allow you to have areas of exposed sub-roof free from visible guidelines.
2a) Make sure to draw your bottom, or 1st row guideline, below the standard width of the tar paper. You will want to allow for approximately 1/4 inch of overhang. I have about 1/2 inch or so on the sides for ease of handling the paper strips. These overhangs are to allow for the scale 2 inch wide fascia board to be attached to the underside/edge of the sub-roof. You will trim any excess overhang in a later step.
2b) When drawing roofing guidelines, allow for the paper strip to overlap the strip below it by about a scale 6 inches. This is to allow you to have different widths of roofing paper without exposing the sub-roof.

Due to the desire to have small areas of the sub-roof exposed by damaged tar paper, I chose not to use my usual adhesive (3-M #465 Adhesive Transfer Tape 1/2In X 60Yd http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/Adhesives/Tapes/Products/~/3M-Adhesive-Transfer-Tape-465?N=5962555+3293242351&rt=rud ). The adhesive used is white glue (Elmer's Glue-All) applied to the back of each individual strip using tooth picks. Glue is applied so that only a thin film is on the roofing strip being mounted.
3) Lay the strip down using the guideline drawn on the sub-roof. Once the edge of the strip against/following the guideline is tacked into place, use the 'chalk rag' to pat the balance of the roof strip into place. Make sure not to use a wiping motion as the alignment of the paper strip may be affected and any glue weep will be accentuated.
3a) Try to remove any excess glue prior to pressing the strip firmly into place with the patting motion. By first lightly patting the paper strip, excess glue may be located and removed using the tip of a toothpick. Slide the toothpick tip under the roofing strip to pickup the excess glue. Finally, pat fairly firmly, the roofing strip into place using the chalk rag. Rotate the rag as needed if any glue gets on the rag. **NOTE** that the use of the chalk rag and patting motion will impart some fine chalk dust along the seams and adhere to the bit of glue along the seams. The rag will also soften the charcoal drawn seam lines in the paper strip.
4) Trace over the drawn vertical seam lines if/as needed using a very sharp charcoal pencil and then pat the area again with the chalk rag.
5) After applying a couple of horizontal rows of roofing strips, allow the assembly to dry under weight. This is to minimize the warping of the matte board sub-roof and to allow the roofing strips to dry 'flat' so as to not pull on the sub-roof creating excess warping/bending.
6) Color any exposed sub-roof using a small liner brush (4/0) and different washes. I used MikeC's #8 ink and a light sepia wash in this process.
7) After coloring exposed sub-roofing, and with the areas still damp, use the chalk rag and lightly pat the area to blend the roofing edges which were colored by the washes.


In the picture above, note the stained sub-roof in the roofing strip, left side of wheel house, 3rd strip up from the bottom edge of the wheel house, the small triangular cut. Compare sub-roofing coloring to roofing strip 5 up from bottom of wheel house, left side, where additional staining has not yet been applied.



-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 01/29/2016 3:57:44 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7010 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/16/2016 :  3:23:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris that is looking outstanding. Great coloring and the tutorial top notch as usual.

Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 9314 Go to Top of Page
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