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George D
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Posted - 06/14/2015 :  08:15:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris, I agree with the others, excellent summary of how to carve foam.

George



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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/14/2015 :  11:26:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
To pick some nits :-) I think the stones around the ore chutes and the area below the chutes needs more rain effect weathering. I'd expect the weathering to build up around the corners of the chutes, rather than in the middle, based on rain coming down the sides of the chutes (capillary action.) Also, I think there would be mildew effects along the top of the wood above the chutes.

This is not to take away from how great this looks overall, it's just to provide some food for thought!

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/14/2015 :  1:01:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, thanks for the input. I agree with you on the lack of weathering created by the chute corners. I need to complete my spackling/mortar around the chute wall boards prior to the next weathering sequence. Looking at the prototype pictures, your comments are very valid. I have not seen mold, but I have seen a light orange-red rust stain, probably from the metal chute liners and chute hardware. I did use MikeC's #8 ink stain as it does have a subtle hint of green. That color value is visible on some of the sleepers. I'll be working the next weathering sequence in a few days, so I'm looking forward to your input. And no... you're not nit picking in my book.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Country: USA | Posts: 7101 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 06/20/2015 :  11:52:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
looking forward to it.

It's Only Make Believe

Bob Harris

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TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 06/20/2015 :  1:28:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm ready for update.


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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/20/2015 :  7:05:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, another week has been put in the books, so it's time to show a little modeling progress.

If you will recall, we now pretty much have the wall components fabricated.


The chute wall (north wall) still needs to have the big sign painted on the wall identifying the mill and some final weathering added to the chutes.

My original thoughts was to apply spackling paste (mortar) behind the 2x6 wall boards making up the chute walls to make a tight seam. After careful study, I determined that the few chutes where mortar was needed would be more difficult than first projected with little return for the work. As this is a 'sandbox' build, I decided to abandon this step.

Painted Wall Sign
I did not feel that I had the lettering skills to paint the sign on the wall. I was going to use press on lettering, as I had discussed with Frederic Testard, but it turned out that was not a option.

I decided to use the "How To: Wall Signs" method as presented by Ralph Renzetti (CN6401) in his thread: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=38442. This method is the use of a paper sign, sanded thin and added to the wall. Most experienced modelers have used or are aware of the process. The advantage to this method is that it provides the ability to have a very strong white background and show underlying wall texture, both aspects of the sign which I desired. The technique does present an issue however in that I will need to have a fairly thick piece of paper to obtain the strong white background desired. This could obscure the underlying wall texture if a additional modification to the technique is not employed to further soften the paper to conform to the wall texture.

I determined that this was a good way to test my ideas and meet the objectives of a painted wall sign. In addition, if the test did not present acceptable results, it would be easy to hide with a standard sign using a wooden frame/back.

196) Print out on a quality printer paper the sign. (Reference the how-to tutorial for a bunch of tips and tricks for printing signs.)
197) Coat the front side of the sign with Testors Dull Coat.
198) Cut out the sign using a new #11 or better, single edge razor blade.
199) Place a small piece of masking tape over the middle 1/2 of the sign, placing the tape on the back side of the sign. This will help from sanding the sign too fine in the center where most finger pressure is applied.
200) Sand the backside of the sign on a fine sandpaper, removing as much of the paper as possible without damage to the front of the sign. When necessary, remove the masking tape to further sand the paper to an even thickness.
201) Apply a thinned white glue mixture to the backside of the sign and place the sign in position on the wall. You may find it useful in some applications to apply a coat of wet water to the area where the sign will be placed.
202) Using a damp rag or soft brush, lightly push the sign into the contours of the wall. Be careful not to overstretch or tear the sign.
203) Allow the sign to fully dry.
204) Make small cuts as needed where the sign did not properly conform to the wall contours. Be aware that the cuts may become visible as the sign conforms to the wall contours, so be judicious in placing and making the cuts.
205) Flood the sign and sign edges with MicroSol. http://www.microscale.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=MI-2
206) Allow the MicroSol to soften the paper for a couple of minutes prior to lightly pushing the paper into the wall texture with a damp finger / damp paper towel. One would not normally press a decal, but this is thick paper and thus the modifications from the standard usage of the MicroSol product.
207) Allow the MicroSol and paper to dry between applications. I used 9 applications of MicroSol over a 5 day period to accomplish the task of getting the paper to resemble a painted sign on the stone wall.
208) Using a black Ultra Fine Point Sharpie pin, touch-up the sign lettering as needed.

My sign had a very thin black boarder going around the sign edges. I had some damage to the left edge of the sign where I had held the sign too tight in tweezers and cut the sign a bit long. I tried to correct this area with cuts, position and removal of the paper and reapplication of the edge using the Sharpie. As this edge turned out to be an eye-sore, I needed to hide the error.

To hid the error I decided to cover the offending sign edge with the base to a goose-necked lamp. I settled on the use of 2 lamps on this wall. The lamps would be located between the 3 banks of chutes.

209) Color 4x4 stock to match the framework of window and door headers/frames.
210) Cut two pieces of colored 4x4 from the stock, each piece 3 scale foot in length.
211) Sand the cut ends of the 4x4 square.
212) Dip the 4x4's into a Silverwood bath and then set on paper towel. Lightly wipe the 4x4's to remove excess Silverwood. Allow to dry.
213) Mark and drill a hole for the goose-neck hanger into the 4x4's. My hole was drilled 1 scale foot from the end of the 4x4 with a #72 wire bit.
214) Glue the 4x4 into position on the wall making sure that the drilled hole is on the top part of the 4x4.

Below are a couple of pictures showing the added paper sign and lamp hangers.




Final Weathering of Chutes/Sleepers:
Dave pointed out that the weathering did not quite match what was expected. He was also kind in his note that he did not mention the overly stained sleepers below the chute openings. If one will review the sleepers in the prototype picture (link on page 1, introduction to the thread.) it can been seen that the staining is more pronounced at the corner of the chute openings, and not directly below the chutes, as I have.

I chose to have heavy staining below the chute openings as I do not have the bib board below the chutes on the vertical to the wall as the prototype, but applied the bib horizontal to assist in covering gaps below the chute floor. Thus, I suspect the minds eye would expect a bit more coloring directly the chute opening.

The staining of the sleepers is too strong on purpose as I planned on using the outside edges for a darker stain with lighter hues towards the center of the stain.

215) Using a fine liner brush, apply a diluted wash of Rust-All to the sleepers below the chutes. Draw the thin stain line straight down below the corner/walls of the chutes. Repeat the application, allowing time for the Rust-All to dry between applications.
216) Apply a fine pastel line of red going down the center of the Rust-All wash stain. Apply this chalk line very lightly. **Do Not Use Weathering Powders** as the adhesive in the powder will not allow you to control the volume of red chalk applied. Remember, red is a very strong hue, and only a very light line is desired here. Use a triangle to make sure that the pastel line is vertical on the wall. I used a Cretacolor Fine Art Pastel pencil #115 Permanent red dark to draw my line. ( http://www.dickblick.com/products/cretacolor-fine-art-pastel-pencils )
217) Use a stiff china bristle brush with the bristles cut short (appx. 1/8th inch) to lightly scrub the pastel vertically.
218) Apply a light dusting of raw sienna powered pastel to the ore chutes interior and centered in the stain below the chute openings. I used a Schmincke powdered pigment, but a powered pastel would also work. I would avoid weathering powders in this step.
219) Using a soft toothbrush, brush the sleepers below the chute openings to feather the raw sienna into the stain on the sleepers. This will mute the strong dark stain, leaving the dark stain 'outline' on the sleepers below the chute openings.
220) Draw a light line over the red stains created earlier with a soft pastel in the burnt sienna tones. I used a soft pastel stick, Rembrandt #411.3
221) Lightly scrub the applied burnt umber pastel line into the sleepers using the stiff china bristle or toothbrush to feather the edges.
222) Apply a bit of red to the lip edge and main stain just below the chute opening to a couple of chutes at random.
223) Use the toothbrush to feather the red pastel applied in the prior step.
224) Use a wash of clear Acetone to set the pastels. Lightly flood the interior of each chute, drawing excess acetone down over the stain directly below the chute opening. Use a number 1 soft round, approximately 1 brush-load per chute.
225) Set the red hue stains below the corners of each chute with a clear acetone wash. Use a small #0 liner (soft sable) to apply the wash. I used a #0 Winsor & Newton Artists Water Colour Sable.
226) Lightly scrub horizontally the face of all sleepers to feather any necessary color edges with the toothbrush.

This should provide some sleepers and chute openings which appear weathered with the center stain below each opening being muted but showing a general ore color stain with a darker water stain outline. Also, nail holes and other graining details should be visible. Notice that the wood between the chute openings should appear to be a basic weathered silver-grey with staining seeping in from the sides via capillary action.









Add Stone Extension Block to Wall
Well, now that the basic wall components have been completed while in the 'flat', it's about time to start assembling the walls so that the roof can be considered. Remember, due to my massive brain failure at the start of the project, my walls have no real consistent footprint, so this will be a cut and paste process.

Starting with something simple, the stone wall extension will be added. If you will recall, I wanted this extension to appear as an after thought built at a later time than the original structure. As such, the seams need to be mortar.

The starting point is this:


227) Glue the stone extension to the long wall, making sure there is a lip on the top edge allowing for the roof to be added to the stone extension. The stone extension is glued to the long wall forming a corner trap. This will make the stone extension block flush with the front wall when the front (or second wall) wall is glued into place. The stone extension will be covering the uncarved area of the long wall to which it is being glued. I used wood glue, making sure that glue did not fill the seam where spackle will be applied.

The drawing below shows how the stone extension block was glued to the long wall forming a lip which the front (or second long wall) fits into making the corner to the structure.


228) Once the stone extension block glue has dried, apply spackle to the seam joint at the rear/back edge. This makes the mortar line seam between the extension block and the long wall. Allow the spackle to dry.
229) Apply Silverwood to the spackle/mortar using a fine liner brush. Try to keep the Silverwood off of the surrounding stones.

The colored mortar seam on the rear/back of the stone extension block.


230) Glue the front wall into place using the lip of the trap for extra gluing surface. Make sure that excess glue does not weep out of the seam between the stone extension block and the front wall as this seam will be filled with spackle. Make sure walls are at 90 degree angle and allow joint to dry thoroughly.
231) Apply spackle to seam between front wall and stone extension block. Allow to dry.

Below are pictures of the spackled/mortar seam prior to coloring the seam with Silverwood.




Next up will be the addition of the final two walls so that we have the shell of the structure.

As always, thanks for stopping by. Comments on the good, bad and ugly are of course welcome. I also want to thank those, and their patience, who visited during my eternal multiple editing/posting of this entry.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 06/20/2015 8:53:07 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7101 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 06/20/2015 :  8:21:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Really like the sign Kris. Great weathering on the chutes. Never thought those pencils would be handy.

Will be on my wish list the next time I order from Dick Blick. And a great tutorial on how this is all done.



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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/20/2015 :  9:03:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The "2 tone" weathering under the chutes looks really good, and I suspect some dust/chalk overall "finish" weathering will really tie all the colors together.

On the roof: Suggest you do some tracings or paper mock-ups to get the dimensions of the roof captured. You could then cut a sub-roof that fits inside the walls and use that to bolster/reinforce the roof that fits on top of the walls. I did (multiple) paper roof templates on my (misshapen) CM Roundhouse project, it was easy to cut and redo the paper until I captured the correct shape of the roof. I then cut a sub roof from thin(1/64) plywood, and built the rest of the roof on that.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6571 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/20/2015 :  10:55:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That sure has been a lot of pains taking carving Kris'. But it sure has paid off.
The sign looks great. Nice progress'..



Ted

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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/21/2015 :  5:01:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks guys for the complements.

Jerry - The more I use the pencils the more I'm finding myself becoming dependent on them. I'd avoid a set and buy just the selected greys and earth tones which you think you will use. The main thing is to play a bit with them. I'm finding more ways to use them, so much so that I've started keeping a bunch of them on the work bench next to the brushes.

Dave - Good thought about the roof. I had planned on using some scale 12x to act as rafter/bracing for the roof, pushing the stick into the foam. But your idea/suggestion has a lot of advantages, so I'll have to revisit my options once I actually get to the roof fabrication.

Ted - The foam is not that time consuming or difficult to carve. I can carve and texture a full wall in 20 minutes or less, and that's a relaxed carving pace. The foam properties make carving a dream, and it's actually hard to make an error which is difficult to recover from.

Add Stone Extension Block to Wall - continued
232) Use a fine liner or #0 round sable to apply Silverwood to color the spackled seam. Set aside to dry.

I was not willing to accept the final coloring of the stains on the sleepers below the chutes. I felt that there was was too much red under the corners and that the stains below the actual chute openings did not have the raw earth ore colors which I would expect to see. So I decided on a rework of the stains...

Rework Final Weathering of Chutes/Sleepers:
I was not willing to accept the final coloring of the stains on the sleepers below the chutes. I felt that there was was too much red under the corners and that the stains below the actual chute openings did not have the raw earth ore colors which I would expect to see. So I decided on a rework of the stains...

233) Using a rattlecan of Testor's Dullcoat, I gave the chute wall a light misting of Dullcoat. Dullcoat will actually somewhat 'melt' the soft pastels applied to the walls, effectively erasing the majority of the soft pastel. Dullcoat does not have the same effect with weathering powders due to the pressure adheasive in the weathering powder. Allow the Dullcoat to dry overnight.
234) Apply a light line of a darker brown soft pastel over the strong red lines below the corner of the chutes. The brown will further mute the red hue. I used a Conte pastel pencil, #32 - Umber. ( http://www.dickblick.com/products/conte-pastel-pencils )
235) Use a toothbrush to lightly scrub the sleeper surfaces. This will further reduce the strong red tones and feather the red and umber color edges.
236) I applied raw sienna, flesh and some darker red hues of powdered pastels from the bottom of my pastel stick storage trays. I used the stiff china bristle brush with short bristles to apply the chalk.
237) Use a standard 1 inch finish paint brush to feather the pastels onto the sleepers below the chute openings. Hold the brush so the narrow edge of the brush fits below the chute openings.
238) Use a #0 soft round to apply a small amount of clear ETOH to the lip and the sleepers just below the chute openings. Hold the brush almost horizontal to the sleepers when touching the brush to the chute lip and sleepers. The tip of the brush is touched to the lip of the chute opening/floor and the heel of the heel/ferrule are against the sleepers below the chute opening. Make no attempt to have the brush touch all the sleepers to apply the ETOH. Do not draw the brush down the face of the sleepers. Just touch and lift the brush. This produces a stain within the stained area below the chute opening.

Below is the brush position for applying the clear ETOH. Just quickly touch the brush to the area to deposit a small amount of ETOH.


The chute stain coloring after the 'redo'.








-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 06/21/2015 5:24:50 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7101 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 06/21/2015 :  9:49:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kris, your painted sign and additional weathering all look fantastic!
This is really shaping up to be one great looking mill!

Greg Shinnie



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TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 06/21/2015 :  11:23:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice job toning that down a hair. Like Greg said one good looking mill.


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Ray Dunakin
Fireman



Posted - 06/21/2015 :  11:25:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit Ray Dunakin's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looking good. Nice save, correcting the stains!


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hon3_rr
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/22/2015 :  10:31:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Guys,
Thanks for the comments and encouragement. I get the feeling that others also did not 'agree' with the earlier staining, but didn't speak up... It would have been OK... just would have confirmed my feelings about the coloring. I've got a pretty thick skin, and am posting here to obtain the input of others. So please, always feel free to comment.

The New York mill had a few different roof lines over it's life, as can be seen in the prototype photos in the introduction post of this thread. I'm not sure where I'm going with the roof, but currently I'm thinking of doing a composite of the various roof lines. This would present a roof similar to the Penn Mill's roof as shown below.

The Penn Mill is in the foreground. The Iron City is in the background. That's Clear Creek running in front of the mill. Both mills were in Clear Creek Canyon near Black Hawk, about 30 minutes from where I'm sitting as I type this.

Don't forget, the New York mill also has a water flume feeding a waterwheel and enters into the mill via the roof.

So this is what I'm currently thinking. Wonder if I can pull this one off?

NOTE: Picture is from Colorado School of Mines.


-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 06/22/2015 10:39:56 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7101 Go to Top of Page

sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/22/2015 :  12:32:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit sgtbob's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kris, I have followed this build from the start but have not commented often. You are doing an
absolutely fantastic job of it.

Bob


http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=30102&whichpage=1
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=38921
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=45371
http://www.freewebs.com/santmod/

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