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Author Previous Topic: Small Layout Design Help/Challenge - c.1905 Pennsy Topic Next Topic: forced perception question
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CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 07/06/2015 :  09:20:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have done one of his PRR XA cars, and I agree it is a superb kit. I did it for a friend who is all thumbs when it comes to such delicate work. I want to make some for myself, probably do a few of the B&O M2s, as interchange. Some of his Civil War series cars look very similar to stuff that ran on some of the short lines hereabout. Some really grainy early pics of the MA & PA in York, PA, show what could very easily be old USMRR rolling stock.

Horse




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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/08/2015 :  8:30:37 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
After about a month of construction largely over lunch periods I completed my two Pennsy GE drop bottom gondolas today with a bit of weathering. Over the weekend I had airbrushed them with Scalecoat "PRR Freight Car Red" which makes them stand out a little on my layout. Some people might call this color more orange than so-called boxcar red, but to me it looks more brown. The trucks are colored the same and weathered a little with Bragdon powders.



I like all the fiddly-bits on the sides and ends and you can see I have one set up for a load such as lumber.

Behind them is one of the Amesville Shops PRR XB 34' boxcars, which I built last year. I really like these kits and they go together fast. At least they do if you don't make a GA into a GE like I did.

So here I am, another project moved from the "in progress" list to the "completed" list. Time to get back to my Lehigh Valley scratchbuilt and Canfield and McGlone resin kit gondolas so I can haul more coal.

Mike
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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/08/2015 :  8:48:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice looking gondolas, Mike. I agree those details make the cars stand out. I'm looking forward to the next project.

George



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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 07/09/2015 :  12:35:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They are sharp Looking Mike.
Ready for service.


It's only make-believe

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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/09/2015 :  07:10:15 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
George, thank you. The next project seems to be completing a couple of old projects.

Bob, I like the sounds of "ready for service." Thank you for the kind words.

Mike


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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

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CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 07/09/2015 :  3:57:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike;

They are great!

Just an FYI, PRR tended to have it's FCC a little more red, than brown. They did that on purpose to make their rolling stock stand out a bit in a train.

Horse




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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/09/2015 :  5:00:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The color of pre-Tuscan PRR cars has been a matter of much debate. I'd be interested to hear Horse's source for "a little more red than brown." There's one well-argued school that goes for an orange color, which is what I've used for my 1890s era cars.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/09/2015 :  5:52:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Horse, Dave,

You might have noticed I gave absolutely no justification for my choice of paint, so here it is: years ago, not knowing anything about PRR colors and figuring that even if I knew anything about twentieth century PRR color it likely does not apply to the previous century, I arbitrarily used Floquil Box Car Red for all my Pennsy fleet. I used it all up, I cannot get more and last weekend I found an almost unused bottle of the Scalecoat PRR Freight Car Red. Figuring at least one person at Scalecoat thinks this is the real thing I used it.

I also figured I'd start a discussion, which I did. Orange you glad?

Mike


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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/09/2015 :  6:39:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is worth reading on 19th century PRR freight car colors: http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2012/07/05/harolds-pennsylvania-railroad-box-cars/

I'm using Vallejo Amaranth Red (http://www.amazon.com/Vallejo-Amaranth-Red-Paint-17ml/dp/B000PHBF3E ). With a bit of weathering, I think this color works quite well.


dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/09/2015 :  8:23:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Doesn't the discussion about prototype color kinda go out the window after the boxcar has been exposed to the elements?

George



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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/10/2015 :  09:19:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by George D

Doesn't the discussion about prototype color kinda go out the window after the boxcar has been exposed to the elements?

George

I think not, actually. For one thing, it appears that 19th century boxcars were better maintained. I've studied a lot of photos from the 1890s, and most boxcars are relatively clean. Next, the weathering would tend to fade the colors, but red is still red, and brown is still brown :-) In particular, it's unlikely that a given shade of red would weather to a -darker- color.

And besides, what else would we argue about?

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 07/10/2015 :  09:26:14 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Those gons turned out beautifully, Mike. Man, I am impressed with all of your wonderful rolling stock adventures. The three Pennsy cars in your latest picture are inspirational.

Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 07/10/2015 :  11:07:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by deemery

quote:
Originally posted by George D

Doesn't the discussion about prototype color kinda go out the window after the boxcar has been exposed to the elements?

George

I think not, actually. For one thing, it appears that 19th century boxcars were better maintained. I've studied a lot of photos from the 1890s, and most boxcars are relatively clean. Next, the weathering would tend to fade the colors, but red is still red, and brown is still brown :-) In particular, it's unlikely that a given shade of red would weather to a -darker- color.

And besides, what else would we argue about?

dave



I agree. We do the best we can to get it right. I model the west where even less is know about colors used in the 19th century. Except for the V&T that is.

Dave, that article was interesting. I'm afraid I like Scalecoat's paint less yellow version better though. Both versions would defiantly stand out in a freight yard mix.


It's only make-believe

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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/10/2015 :  11:51:49 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mike Hamer

Those gons turned out beautifully, Mike. Man, I am impressed with all of your wonderful rolling stock adventures. The three Pennsy cars in your latest picture are inspirational.



Mike,

Thank you. I had good starting material to work from.

I appreciate your looking in on my adventures as you call them. There always seem to be new paths to explore, as you know.

Mike


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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4126 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/10/2015 :  12:21:00 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave, Horse, Bob,

Just so you know that I do pay attention to reality, here's a little something I wrote in our division's newsletter. Some of you might recognize the reefers.

http://www.keystonedivision.org/newsletter/Flyer56_04_color.pdf

I am aware of the blog Eric did on the Pennsy color and reread it the other evening. It probably did influence my choice of color for the gons a little because the Scalecoat color does come out more orange that your basic Floquil box car red, which has some blue in it to my eye. However the Scalecoat color is orange enough for me, partly because it looks credible, and perhaps more importantly, my layout does not have a bright blue puffy cloud studded sky, but rather a seriously gray overcast look. All colors are somwwhat muted. There is not a big contrast between the different boxcar reds on my layout, but that's the way colors look in the real world in overcast conditions.

Couple of comments on the article, which I found pretty good. First, the fully weathered boxcar looks not too far off the Scalecoat color I used, not the orange of the unweathered examples. Second, Eric's comment that weathering will take care of the orange is almost an admission that it is not really the right color.

Mike


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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4126 Go to Top of Page
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