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Author Previous Topic: The Coos Bay and Willamette Valley Topic Next Topic: Small Layout Design Help/Challenge - c.1905 Pennsy
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dave1905
Fireman



Posted - 03/08/2018 :  11:17:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'll have to look at those options. It was a very sad day when Art Griffin ceased production. I end up using a lot of Westerfield decals for my stuff.

Dave H.

Iron men and wooden cars

Country: USA | Posts: 1130 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 03/09/2018 :  1:11:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave, Yes, a sad day when Art went out of business. I've thought of having decals custom-made because I've gotten so I prefer them over dry transfers for the really small lettering. Because of the brief corporate relationship between the LV and P&R and frequent appearance of thier rolling stock on the LV system, I'd also like to do some early small P&R boxcars, but again, no lettering available to my knowledge. How have you dealt with this problem, Mr. Anthracite hauler?

Here's the latest on my coal facility. I have all the bents and the beginnings of the ramp constructed, which will represent a ballasted earthen approach to the trestle proper. The first photo shows how long it will be:



Here's a different view:



And, I've started on the 204 nbw's that need to be added:



I will go back with additional dirtying-up powders at a later point in the construction.

Mike


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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

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masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 03/10/2018 :  11:08:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice fleet Mike!

I have some catching up to do

Hkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1675 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Engine Wiper

Posted - 03/10/2018 :  11:45:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great looking fleet in that last picture, Mike. Like the way your coal trestle is coming together. You have FAR more patience than I have to add all those NBW's!!

Art Griffin Decals:

Terrible loss. Especially for those of us getting to the TOC19 party quite late.

Andre



Country: | Posts: 434 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 03/10/2018 :  8:32:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Andre. Thank you. Im sort of assessing what I have and what I need (want, I guess) for LV boxcars, so I lined them up by length. These are the 28 and 30 ones. You got me thinking about needing relatively more of these shorter cars.

Patience? Not really. I install a dozen or so nbws then do something else for a while. Scenery. Running a train. Etc.

Mike


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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 03/18/2018 :  11:06:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
A bark car based on a couple of photos:




These cars were used in the late 19th Century to haul tanbark from the forests to tanneries where the bark--usually hemlock--was used in tanning hides.

The rack probably should be higher but I stumbled on dimensions after I had finished the car.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4149 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 03/19/2018 :  10:12:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike, no one will tan your hide for possibly making the rack a little low. It looks good. Nice car.


Country: USA | Posts: 2356 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 03/19/2018 :  10:40:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike, your coal facility is already looking great, and once you complete it, I'm certain it will be a wonderful addition to your developing layout!
Also your Bark car is something I've never seen modeled before, nice work on it.

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 7780 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 03/19/2018 :  2:36:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I like the bark car. It has a lot caricature and interest. The Coal station is stretching out nicely too. Is that it's intended placing?

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4737 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 03/19/2018 :  5:51:25 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thank you guys!

Bill, more of that and I might do as Socrates did and end it all with a drink of hemlock.*

Greg, youre right about these cars. Ive only once seen them modeled. I dont think many class 1 railroads had bark cars on their rosters. The LV had fifty of them.

Bob, the coal ramp will be in a different spot near the backdrop; I wanted a sense of how it would look. It keeps me motivated.

Mike

*different hemlock, actually.



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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4149 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 03/19/2018 :  6:12:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Like Greg, I've never seen one of those cars modeled before...heck I didn't even know they existed!
Looks cool Mike!



Country: USA | Posts: 2978 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 03/20/2018 :  1:19:37 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Carl B

Like Greg, I've never seen one of those cars modeled before...heck I didn't even know they existed!
Looks cool Mike!


Carl,

Thank you. They are rare indeed.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4149 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 03/20/2018 :  1:55:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I've been asked what I do to finish off the ridge of a slate roof Here's something from the National Park Service:

"Detailing at the hips, ridges and valleys provided added opportunity to ornament a slate roof. Hips and ridges can be fashioned out of slate according to various traditional schemes whereby the slates are cut and overlapped to produce a watertight joint of the desired artistic effect. Traditional slate ridge details are the saddle ridge, strip saddle ride and comb ridge, and for hips, the saddle hip, mitered hip Boston hip, and fantail hip. A more linear effect was achieved by covering the ridges and hips with flashing called "cresting" or "ridge roll" formed out of sheet metal, terra cotta, or even slate. Snow guards, snow boards, and various types of gutter and rake treatments also contributed to the character of historic slate roofs."

For one of my first slate roofs, I gently scribed and bent a thin sheet of styrene--probably 0.005" or 0.01" thickness--then cut out a strip, painted it gray and glued it on:



Another option is to lay overlapping individual slates along the ridge, a lot of work:



And finally, I've also used no cap at all,but it is difficult to get a nice clean cut:



I have seen slate on some pretty modest houses and businesses where it must have been more affordable than today and where a very robust roof was desired. I do not think a slate roof on a model of a marginal business or home is inappropriate; in fact a weathered slate roof on a rundown structure indicates how much the building has declined since its original days of glory.

I use minimal weathering on my slate roofs because they would have been relatively new during the period I model.

This has reminded me that my car shop still needs a ridge cap of some sort.



Which method will I use?

Mike


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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4149 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/20/2018 :  2:34:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike,
Thanks for posting the prototype information. I will consider all aspects of the different types when I get to that point on my building.
I also like the bark car.
Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 3602 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 03/20/2018 :  3:31:49 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Rich,

Thank you and youre welcome.

Mike


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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4149 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 64 Previous Topic: The Coos Bay and Willamette Valley Topic Next Topic: Small Layout Design Help/Challenge - c.1905 Pennsy  
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