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Jim from Valencia CA
Engine Wiper

Posted - 10/01/2013 :  2:05:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The new issue of Model Railroader features an article by Tony Koester about weathering a steam locomotive in seven minutes. In the article he says he used productes called PanPastels which are made by a company named Colorfin. Evidently, this is a weathering powder that adheres to the model without requiring an overspray of dullcoat or some other sealant.

I was wondering whether anyone has used this product and how it compares to the weathering powders made by Bragdon. I also was wondering whether the application of this product really does not require an overspray of a sealant like dullcoat. The article definitely triggered my interest.

Country: USA | Posts: 230

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/01/2013 :  2:17:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've used Pan Pastels on wood freight cars with good effects. Roger Malinowski sells a very good video on their use, as well as RR-oriented starter sets: http://www.stoneycreekdesigns.com

Like Bragdon weathering powders, they do seem to stick to models much better than conventional pigments.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6306 Go to Top of Page

dallas_m
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/01/2013 :  2:54:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jim from Valencia CA

The new issue of Model Railroader features an article by Tony Koester about weathering a steam locomotive in seven minutes.

If ever comes the day when I could find, gather and deliver all the stuff I need for a simple project to the workbench in only 7 minutes ... what a day that will be!


Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!

Country: USA | Posts: 4674 Go to Top of Page

CN6401
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/02/2013 :  10:37:05 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim,
Bragdon and Pan powders can be applied on almost any surface.(keyword - ALMOST)
I do this as a business and what they didn't tell you or calculate in is the prep time. Putting powders straight on the driver wheel is a no no. The powder could get imbedded in the wheel lube. The wheels need to be cleaned and any lubrication removed. This will take at least an hour, even using a sonic cleaner.
Cody deviated from the way Tony did it by using an airbrush on the drivers, so there's more prep time. Getting your airbrush ready and mixing the paint for spraying for sure takes more then seven minutes alone.

Now in answer to your question regarding Dullcote, if you want to have a good and hassle free job, you need some sort of Matt finish. A light coat of water based or solvent Matt finish will make the job so much better. With a matte coating, you will actually use less powder to achieve your finished model. When your finished another light coat will seal the job, and of course the coating is applied with an airbrush for best results.
Ralph


Growing old is mandatory . . . growing up is optional
©
A Touch of Yesterday©..............Weathered Rail Cars.

Edited by - CN6401 on 03/15/2017 9:47:11 PM

Country: Canada | Posts: 1476 Go to Top of Page

AVRR-PA
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/02/2013 :  2:13:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit AVRR-PA's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I have no opinion on whether it's possible to weather a steam loco in seven minutes. I'm responding to the general question about Pan Pastels.

KarlO (Karl Osolinski) turned me onto them some years ago and I like them a lot, for structures and structures-on-wheels (rolling stock). I recommend them. I've never tried them on motive power.

Don



Country: USA | Posts: 5005 Go to Top of Page

CVSNE
Crew Chief

Posted - 10/02/2013 :  3:10:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit CVSNE's Homepage  Send CVSNE a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I would have preferred to see a little more specific tips on using the Pan Pastels (I have two weathering sets, but haven't used them yet) and less emphasis on the whole "7 minute" thing, which I thought was cheesy.
But there are a few folks at Kalmbach obsessed with putting a number on the cover of the magazine - "10 top tips" "12 Landmark Layouts" "7 Minutes to grubbier cars"....


Marty McGuirk
Manassas, VA
www.centralvermontrailway.blogspot.com

Country: | Posts: 610 Go to Top of Page

Jim from Valencia CA
Engine Wiper

Posted - 10/02/2013 :  7:14:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the comments. I agree that seven minutes sounds like too little time to do the job right. I bought a couple of weathering sets on Amazon. We'll see how they work. With the Bragdon powders, on rolling stock, I find that I have to seal the powders with a blast of dullcoat. As someone mention, an airbrush is best for this.


Country: USA | Posts: 230 Go to Top of Page

CN6401
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/02/2013 :  7:21:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Marty,
Using these Pan Powders is like using any other new product, go lightly until you get the hang of it.
My recommendation is to apply a lite coat of matte finish, pick your product water based or solvent based. Then add the powders in multiple lite applications instead of one heavy one. Apply the powder with a 1/8th inch square stiff bristled brush and lightly scrub the powder into the surface. After each application step back and see how it looks. I also suggest an application of matte between colours, this seals the previous coat and set up for the next coat.
These powders are great for wood and plastic but each have their characteristics.
Ralph


Growing old is mandatory . . . growing up is optional
©
A Touch of Yesterday©..............Weathered Rail Cars.

Country: Canada | Posts: 1476 Go to Top of Page

LynnB
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/05/2013 :  9:34:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Again and again and again there will be new products that come on the market for weathering wood plastics etc. Each spring I find myself researching and purchasing for the next fall to spring building weathering products. The time is takes to weather something is or shouldn't be the issue at hand but more of the enjoyment and satisfactions you receive from the finished product.


Country: Canada | Posts: 2314 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/16/2017 :  12:02:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Make-up applicators, sponges and "foam q-tips", work great for applying Pan Pastels and chalks, and they're a lot cheaper than the custom foam products the art stores sell. (The relief on our models tends to chew up the expensive foam applicators.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6306 Go to Top of Page

jeyjey
Engine Wiper



Posted - 03/16/2017 :  12:20:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I use PanPastels and Bragdon powders interchangeably. They've both got some stick, so perhaps don't require an overcoat, but I always use one.

Cheers,
Jeff.


Modelling the D&RGW and C&S in HOn3.

Country: Ireland | Posts: 367 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/16/2017 :  4:57:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I find that DR. Ben's "Industrial Powders" stick the best and require no fixative at all.
I also very much like "Pan Pastels" and use makeup brushes'. I use Doc O Brian's chalk powders with good results also'..



Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 4523 Go to Top of Page

herronpeter
Engine Wiper

Posted - 03/17/2017 :  08:14:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Speaking of weathering brushes see the below post I made on another forum:

http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/12474

I use the pan pastels a lot and like them because the don't disappear when you apply an over coat like chalks do.

Peter



Country: USA | Posts: 136 Go to Top of Page
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