Railroad Line Forums - HTRR - Chapter 2
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 4 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 107 ]  [ Total: 111 ]  [ Newest Member: Traintinker ]
 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Model Railroad Construction
 HTRR - Chapter 2
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Previous Topic: hot wire foam cutter Topic Next Topic: The grandson layout
Page: of 35

Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 01/10/2014 :  11:09:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Harsco

quote:
Originally posted by dlwrailfan1


"The top line is electrical conduit for the lights, the middle a steam line for heating, and the bottom for the tar"

Rick,

Another great industry. Is your model of the piping based on research or your prior experience in the industry?

Eric



Thanks, Eric....it's a mixture of research, opportunity, and imagineering. In it's heyday, Barrett was a fairly substantial producer of chemicals, asphalt and shingle/roofing materials. The inspiration for modeling it was partly as a customer for Commonwealth as well as Joe H's description of a Barrett facility that used to be located in South Philly. As one of the many byproducts of the coking process, tar tends to be pretty thick, gooey stuff, requiring heat in the form of steam in order to thin it enough to flow. Besides tar and aggregate, the facility receives boxcars of paper and an occasional hopper of coal for the powerhouse.

The finished products are shipped via the Barrett Capital Street warehouse (on the other side of the wall:
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/Warehouse_zps9a570c9d.jpg.html][/URL]





Rick,

I'm really liking the Barret Warehouse in this photo - is the build of it detailed elsewhere on RR-L? I'm needing a thin structure to go up against an area of backdrop and this warehouse fits the bill nicely. I like the color scheme and weathering, and the factory windows.

Al Carter



Country: USA | Posts: 4630 Go to Top of Page

Harsco
Fireman



Posted - 01/10/2014 :  3:29:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Al...Barrett Warehouse is a combination of two different buildings and materials; the one closest to the boxcars was superbly built and detailed by Steam Nut from (if memory serves) a Walther's background building. Here's a close up to show all the nice details he added:

[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/Warehouse3_zps1ed1d653.jpg.html][/URL]

The back part is a King Mill photo building laminated to Foamcore and built in a wedge shape to fit the available space; I added 3D pilasters and a few details to spiffy it up a bit. Here's an overhead shot to illustrate the area:

[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/Warehouse2_zps92f169aa.jpg.html][/URL]




Country: USA | Posts: 1320 Go to Top of Page

Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 01/11/2014 :  11:46:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Rick,

With apologies to Steam Nut, it was actually the back building that caught my eye - the factory windows, and the brownish color just sort of reached out and grabbed me, I guess. Thanks for the explanation and additional photos - and Steam's building looks great too, especially the interior detailing.

OK, now another question, regarding your track. Well, actually, the ties - assuming (I know, that's dangerous) that you used flextrack, how did you weather your ties? I have just installed some track (using Peco code 83 flex track) and need to get rid of the shine on the ties. I don't want to spray them in place, so I was thinking of a base coat of some type of flat paint brushed on, then weathered with washes on top, maybe... Wondering what you have done.

Thanks,

Al Carter



Country: USA | Posts: 4630 Go to Top of Page

Harsco
Fireman



Posted - 01/11/2014 :  11:03:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tabooma County Rwy

Thanks, Rick,

With apologies to Steam Nut, it was actually the back building that caught my eye - the factory windows, and the brownish color just sort of reached out and grabbed me, I guess. Thanks for the explanation and additional photos - and Steam's building looks great too, especially the interior detailing.

OK, now another question, regarding your track. Well, actually, the ties - assuming (I know, that's dangerous) that you used flextrack, how did you weather your ties? I have just installed some track (using Peco code 83 flex track) and need to get rid of the shine on the ties. I don't want to spray them in place, so I was thinking of a base coat of some type of flat paint brushed on, then weathered with washes on top, maybe... Wondering what you have done.

Thanks,

Al Carter



Thanks, Al....your assumption about being flex track is correct; in my case it's Atlas Code 83. Like you, I don't want to spray the track since the CFO would be certain to register her protests, leading me to the method you alluded to. Here's the process:

First, regular old Atlas flex:
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/1_zpsf05257fd.jpg.html][/URL]

Since the ties are already brown, it makes the process a little easier and faster. Here's the materials used, left to right: diluted white glue, a cup with ballast, isopropyl alcohol, Americana craft (acrylic) paint, either Raw Umber (darker) or Burnt Umber (lighter), a paint brush (I've used pointed or straight),and the following Floquil Paint Markers: Rail Brown, Railroad Tie Brown, Roof Brown, Grime, Weathered Black, and Rust.[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/3_zps43b97e06.jpg.html][/URL]

First step is to slosh on either the Raw or Burnt Umber across the ties AND rails...the idea here is to give everything a base coat and kill the shine:
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/4_zps5a1b3872.jpg.html][/URL]

I spread the paint out as far as it will go, not being too careful about making sure everything is covered. Make sure the rail sides are painted too; this gives them the same base coating and will help tone down the sometimes too orangy Rust applied in the next step.
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/5_zps33b42a75.jpg.html][/URL]

Dip a rag in water and get the slopped on craft paint off the rails...this saves elbow grease later:
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/6_zps15dfcc6a.jpg.html][/URL]

Let everything dry; here's a side-by-side comparison between unpainted and painted track:
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/7_zpsee42f8fe.jpg.html][/URL]

Next, use the Floquil Rust or Rail Brown marker to do the sides of the rail; being naturally lazy, I only do the side that can be seen but will typically go over the rail in both directions to ensure everything's covered. Most of the time, the markers will deposit paint on the tie plates as well, which is OK. Here's a flash picture of the sides after painting:
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/8_zps69e28df4.jpg.html][/URL]

Now the artsy part: use the Railroad Tie Brown, Rail Brown, and Roof Brown markers on individual ties...remembering that it's not necessary to do ALL of the ties since your base coat of Raw or Burnt Umber is perfectly passable by itself. I will typically skip around the area and alternate the colors, trying to make the pattern look random without overdoing it. Next, selectively use the Weathered Black marker to simulate new ties and the Grime marker for older, worn out ones. I remind myself not to go crazy with these colors since they tend to stand out..a lot. Here's what it looks like when finished:
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/9_zps892f5b77.jpg.html][/URL]

Those Grime colored ones really stick out, don't they? If too garish, I'll tone them down later after everything else is done.

When everything's dried, I put in the ballast; in this case some Woodland Scenics Fine Cinders since it's a yard track:
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/10_zps1d6a7a93.jpg.html][/URL]

The next layer is some Midnight Black grout that fills in the voids and adds another subtle shade of color to the ballast:
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/11_zps5fe5ddad.jpg.html][/URL]

Trim and tamp everything up, then dribble on the isopropyl alcohol using an eyedropper:
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/13_zps5e999ca0.jpg.html][/URL]

....followed by the usual diluted white glue:
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/14_zps482b7d5c.jpg.html][/URL]

Make sure everything soaked pretty good:
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/15_zpse2835857.jpg.html][/URL]

The ballasting steps were included because I've noticed that the alcohol seems to fade and soften the tie colors as they dry; here's an overhead shot of some finished track I recently did in Market Street to illustrate:
[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/2_zps7ecda260.jpg.html][/URL]

I noticed this softening effect the moment I switched from "wet water" to using either 75% or 91% alcohol, so it's still more theory than fact.

While the above method might seem a bit tedious, it really goes fairly quickly since the base coat does most of the work and the markers are used to give select ties a different shade to break up the consistency. I usually alternate between Raw and Burnt Umber depending on whim at the time.

Hope that's helpful....



Edited by - Harsco on 01/11/2014 11:08:01 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 1320 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/12/2014 :  08:50:55 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
A note for those who might follow Harsco's directions word-for-word: The wet rag is being used to remove paint from the railhead. Don't trouble to clean up the sides & base, because they'll be painted over later.


Country: USA | Posts: 5286 Go to Top of Page

Harsco
Fireman



Posted - 01/12/2014 :  10:51:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jbvb

A note for those who might follow Harsco's directions word-for-word: The wet rag is being used to remove paint from the railhead. Don't trouble to clean up the sides & base, because they'll be painted over later.



Correct, jbvb...thanks for catching that!



Country: USA | Posts: 1320 Go to Top of Page

Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 01/12/2014 :  11:09:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rick,

Thank you very much! What a great tutorial! I'm about to start soldering feeders to my track, so once that gets done, I'll assemble the necessary materials and follow your directions. Your track looks so much better, with random shading on the ties. I like the idea of adding grout to the ballast, too. In my case, a lot of my track will be "buried" in dirt and weeds and such, and the grout will certainly help obtain that result.

Again, thanks for sharing your technique!

Al Carter



Country: USA | Posts: 4630 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/12/2014 :  11:34:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Awesome tutorial Rick! Thank you.

Funny you should ask this Al. I was talking to Rick a few days ago, commenting on his previous post and asked him the same question. I'm lucky enough to see his trackwork in person and can tell you it looks that good in person as well. I used to use spray paints to do my track on my old layout but after hearing, and now seeing how Rick does his track, I plan on using his system as the results speak for themselves!


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13544 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/12/2014 :  2:56:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the information on your track weathering, Rick. That's some good information.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14119 Go to Top of Page

Harsco
Fireman



Posted - 01/12/2014 :  3:47:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, gentlemen....as a follow up (and a truth in advertising disclaimer), here's a picture of the finished product that appeared in the previous post:

[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/16_zpscc858b1a.jpg.html][/URL]

Having been somewhat of a hurry, I'm not really happy with the sloppiness of the ballast on the rail sides and ties; usually I'm a little more careful about getting rid of that before gluing.

Al: just a thought/suggestion: if you're going to bury your rail, try using plain ole sifted dirt as the base layer to fill all the voids, then applying the grout as a second coating; one of it's great advantages is its fineness. Being somewhat, ah hem.... parsimonious, I hate using a lot of the grout when only a thin veneer on top is needed. I've used that technique for roads as well, especially when building up a ramp for a grade grossing.



Country: USA | Posts: 1320 Go to Top of Page

Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 01/13/2014 :  11:00:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rick,

Thanks for the suggestion. On the 2nd edition of the Tabooma County Railway, I had indeed used real dirt in a lot of places, both for buried track and elsewhere on the layout. I "borrowed" a couple of coffee cans of dirt from a local playfield. Then, feeling courageous, I contacted the Seattle Mariners and asked if I could beg a small container of the dirt they use at Safeco Field. They put me in touch with the head groundskeeper, who thought my "need" for their dirt was pretty cool. Not only did he give me 2 five gallon pails full of it, he gave me a tour of Safeco Field as well!

So yes, I'm a fan of real dirt. And tile grout, as well. There is a local Habitat for Humanity store here that sells a lot of left over or salvaged building materials, and I have picked up several containers of surplus grout. I'm intrigued about the idea of using it for asphalt roads, too.

Mark, I tried the spray painting of flex track method several years ago (George Sellios had written about this method in the scenery book he authored way back when). It sure makes the track stiff. When sprayed onto Micro Engineering track, well, you can imagine it is just about impossible to bend it after it is painted. I sprayed some of the track on my last layout (with acrylic paint), then I discovered the paint markers. Not only Floquil, but at Michael's I found some brown, black, and "rust" colored paint markers on sale for about $1.00 each, so I stocked up. The brown worked pretty well to color the rail in place. I'll use them plus the Floquil markers when using Rick's technique on my new trackwork.

Thanks, guys!

Al Carter



Country: USA | Posts: 4630 Go to Top of Page

sjconrail
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/13/2014 :  11:16:48 AM  Show Profile  Visit sjconrail's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Rick, excellent walk through on the ballasting. Are you beginning to use a mixture of the WS ballast and Tile Grout? I know you had experimented using one or the other on other parts of the layout,

Phil



Country: USA | Posts: 299 Go to Top of Page

wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 01/13/2014 :  11:29:12 AM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Really nice looking Track, Rick. I'm going to save that post.

Chuck



Country: | Posts: 6317 Go to Top of Page

Harsco
Fireman



Posted - 01/13/2014 :  8:03:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, guys....Phil, to answer your question: yes, I have gravitated to mixing WS ballast and Midnight Black grout for the yard areas; the mainline still gets 100% WS material since it's bigger and a much better representation of real life ballast. I think the key to the "weathered" appearance of the ties is the alcoholwetting agent; it kinda/sorta acts like a thinner on the acrylic based paint and washes it out a little.

Al: if I'm not mistaken, infield dirt tends to be a very finely textured clay, isn't it? Is the coloring of the material you have more reddish than brownish? Time to give my groundskeeper friend a call!



Country: USA | Posts: 1320 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/13/2014 :  8:39:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tabooma County Rwy

Mark, I tried the spray painting of flex track method several years ago (George Sellios had written about this method in the scenery book he authored way back when). It sure makes the track stiff. When sprayed onto Micro Engineering track, well, you can imagine it is just about impossible to bend it after it is painted. I sprayed some of the track on my last layout (with acrylic paint), then I discovered the paint markers. Not only Floquil, but at Michael's I found some brown, black, and "rust" colored paint markers on sale for about $1.00 each, so I stocked up. The brown worked pretty well to color the rail in place. I'll use them plus the Floquil markers when using Rick's technique on my new trackwork.

Thanks, guys!

Al Carter



Al;

You are preaching to the choir! If you've read my thread (which I know you do), you will note that I've commented on using the old track from my old layout and yes, bending Micro Engineering track is difficult enough, but after it's been painted, it's next to impossible!

As for using Rick's technique, I love the results he has achieved with his method, not to mention it has to be less expensive as spray paint only goes so far. Seems most of it is 'overspray'! And the variations of color he gets looks great too, so I'm sold!


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13544 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 35 Previous Topic: hot wire foam cutter Topic Next Topic: The grandson layout  
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Previous Page | Next Page
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-17 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.39 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000