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Harsco
Fireman



Posted - 01/29/2014 :  10:14:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Twist67

Hi,
very nice work and progress on your layout...Nice Photos of the ops sessions...
Thanks for the short step by step about weathering rails and the grout thing....Grout is the material to fill the joints between tiles in the bathroom for example????
Regards,Chris



Thanks, Chris...to answer your question, yes...it's the stuff used for setting tile floors and in the case of the Spectra-Lock material, is extremely fine grained and made in numerous shades. Having only ever used that particular brand in the past, I can't speak for other manufacturer's products.




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Twist67
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/29/2014 :  11:04:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit Twist67's Homepage  Send Twist67 an ICQ Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the answer...the stuff looks nice to work with...I have used something like that some time ago on a small diorama but it wasn´t fine enough so have to take a look at the hardware store to see what i could get....

regards,Chris



Country: Germany | Posts: 274 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/30/2014 :  08:00:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I'm puzzled by one thing, which I could answer myself by spending a few bucks in a big-box store, except I haven't been in one since December: 'grout' I've seen used in tiling is partly portland cement, so after it's mixed with water it cures to a really hard surface in 24 hours or less. So I'm surprised to see you using white glue.


Country: USA | Posts: 5140 Go to Top of Page

Harsco
Fireman



Posted - 01/30/2014 :  10:23:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by jbvb

I'm puzzled by one thing, which I could answer myself by spending a few bucks in a big-box store, except I haven't been in one since December: 'grout' I've seen used in tiling is partly portland cement, so after it's mixed with water it cures to a really hard surface in 24 hours or less. So I'm surprised to see you using white glue.



I will have to defer to someone more knowledgeable of tiling to explain, but I think the Spectra Lock system is different than normal grout; if you look at the picture of the container, the material I'm using is referred to as "Part C", implying that there are other components to the process that perhaps contain the adhesive. Truth be told, I've never tried just wetting the Part C stuff to see if it will harden, instead just reverting back to my modeling experience and using white glue.

For those who might be interested in trying this out, I purchase the Spectra-Lock at Lowes; can't remember ever seeing it at Home Depot.

Another side futz would be using this for modeling concrete streets; you would need to work out an appropriate height taking into consideration sidewalks and driveways, then make formers which would allow the screeding process, which works quite nicely.



Country: USA | Posts: 1320 Go to Top of Page

Tabooma County Rwy
Fireman



Posted - 01/30/2014 :  12:18:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Harsco

Thanks, guys...as a weathering post script, I should mention that the grout color will typically shift a little when you glue it down; not radically, mind you, but noticeable. In this case, the nice light tan turned a shade darker and dare I say, pinker, so the pad got a light dusting of gray chalk to add a bit of contrast in the "post-weathered" picture.

"BTW, I think I heard some of those colorful words you uttered way out hear in the Pacific Northwest. I thought to myself... "Must be a model railroader..."

Al: Having been raised by a man who served in both the Merchant Marine during World War II AND the U.S. Navy during the Korea Conflict, as well as being around the fire service for thirty plus years, I have managed to accumulate quite an startling inventory of scatological invectives, trust me...which to me is a form of aural artistry that unfortunately the HTRR CFO has little appreciation (nor tolerance) for. On one particular evening filled with modeling mishaps, my repertoire was especially evocative, prompting a summons to the bottom of the basement stairs to be asked: "Really?"





Rick,

Similar situation here. Good thing my train room is one floor up and at the other end of the house from my wife's sewing room....

Al



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nhguy
Fireman



Posted - 01/30/2014 :  12:45:25 PM  Show Profile  Visit nhguy's Homepage  Send nhguy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Harsco

quote:
Originally posted by jbvb

I'm puzzled by one thing, which I could answer myself by spending a few bucks in a big-box store, except I haven't been in one since December: 'grout' I've seen used in tiling is partly portland cement, so after it's mixed with water it cures to a really hard surface in 24 hours or less. So I'm surprised to see you using white glue.



I will have to defer to someone more knowledgeable of tiling to explain, but I think the Spectra Lock system is different than normal grout; if you look at the picture of the container, the material I'm using is referred to as "Part C", implying that there are other components to the process that perhaps contain the adhesive. Truth be told, I've never tried just wetting the Part C stuff to see if it will harden, instead just reverting back to my modeling experience and using white glue.

For those who might be interested in trying this out, I purchase the Spectra-Lock at Lowes; can't remember ever seeing it at Home Depot.

Another side futz would be using this for modeling concrete streets; you would need to work out an appropriate height taking into consideration sidewalks and driveways, then make formers which would allow the screeding process, which works quite nicely.



Part "c" is the glue fellas. Its powered and mixes in with the grout. That is cement based and makes the grout harden like cement. That is why you have to use a glue to hold it down. Bill


Bill Shanaman
New Haven RR
Hartford Division
in Colorado.

Country: USA | Posts: 4763 Go to Top of Page

Harsco
Fireman



Posted - 02/08/2014 :  1:58:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As a follow up to my earlier posting, I decided to scrounge up all my Spectra Lock Part C materials that might be useable for depicting concrete and put together a "sampler" to illustrate the color choices:

[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/1756c3a9-fdfb-41a7-a9ca-981d2e830a57_zps3c176751.jpg.html][/URL]

As you examine the picture, keep a couple of things in mind:

1: What's shown is the "finished" color, meaning after it's been glued down, which will shift the shading, sometimes considerably. Case in point is the Mocha, which is much lighter right out of the package and to me at least, looked like a pretty good representation of grayish/tannish concrete. The end result though, is noticeably darker and (again, in my opinion), not really the best choice.

2. Every one of the samples shown have some degree of weathering applied, whether chalk or wash, to see if it could be changed a little. The Mocha has some light gray chalk, the Sand Beige a light gray wash, and the Natural Gray and Sandstone samples only black chalk for exhaust staining.

Opinion-wise, I find Mocha too dark, Sand Beige too tan, Sandstone too pink, with the Natural Gray being the best choice.

BUT...as the old saying goes, beauty, or in this case, concrete, is in the eye of the beholder. With a little artistic application, you might come up with a weathering finish that looks right regardless of the material selected.



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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/08/2014 :  2:07:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Concrete doesn't come in one color, of course :-) I've seen concrete, particularly concrete roads/sidewalks in each of the colors you show. But as I've posted elsewhere, what I tend to use for concrete is unbleached titanium white/titanium buff with a -very small- amount of olive in it. The slight green tinge for some reason looks right to my eye. Then I go back over the surface with various light and dark chalks/pastels to get a more worn look.

The one comment on your set is they're all dark. No matter what, I'd go with a lighter shade (add some white or unbleached titanium) to get a lighter base color, which you can then darken with chalks/pastels.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6292 Go to Top of Page

Harsco
Fireman



Posted - 03/07/2014 :  9:12:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
After much hemming and hawing, along with several failed attempts, I finally settled on a replacement Chicago Bridge and Iron fabrication shop that was holding up completion of the Market Street industrial switching area.

My earlier attempt was a Clever Models steel building:

[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/IMG_2101_zpsd67d447d.jpg.html][/URL]

Visually I wasn't real happy with the result; size-wise, it challenged the notion that large steel weldments and fabrications could be done inside something so small and cramped. Another factor influencing my discontent was that the space for it was never really defined; in other words, I built the building, then realized afterward that it needed to use ALL the limited space in order to look right.

While I like the Clever Models kits and textures, their printed windows left a little bit to be desired; this time I wanted to incorporate some very nice Tichy multi-pane industrial style ones with the tilt out section that practically screams "Industry". So after endlessly scanning Google pictures as well as some of my own files, finally settled with this:

[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/IMG_6673_zpsd05ad7fb.jpg.html][/URL]

[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/IMG_6674_zpse77bf6be.jpg.html][/URL]

[URL=http://s229.photobucket.com/user/RBickmore/media/IMG_6672_zps165decd1.jpg.html][/URL]

Like it's predecessor,the "new" CB&I is made of illustration board reinforced with stripwood and covered with paper corrugated texture; the aforementioned Tichy windows were added, along with a clerestory to liven up the look. The old "office" addition was retained as well. As with any paper covering, the weathering was done with chalk. Hemmed in by the location of the street, other buildings and an inside shipping/receiving spur, the new building is the same overall length , but noticeably wider.

Still left is the usually array of details to suggest a busy fabricator: piles of steel, materials rack, gas cylinder storage shed, lights, transformers, and signage.



Edited by - Harsco on 03/07/2014 9:15:30 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 1320 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 03/07/2014 :  9:21:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Harsco


Al: Having been raised by a man who served in both the Merchant Marine during World War II AND the U.S. Navy during the Korea Conflict, as well as being around the fire service for thirty plus years, I have managed to accumulate quite an startling inventory of scatological invectives, trust me...which to me is a form of aural artistry that unfortunately the HTRR CFO has little appreciation (nor tolerance) for. On one particular evening filled with modeling mishaps, my repertoire was especially evocative, prompting a summons to the bottom of the basement stairs to be asked: "Really?"




Ahhh... rich and picturesque invective, delivered with great skill and artistry. Priceless.

That said, I like where this is going. Nicely done!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 5354 Go to Top of Page

BessemerBob
Engine Wiper

Posted - 03/07/2014 :  9:28:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Glad to see the new building, the open windows really make it pop! Great addition...


"the sleep of a laboring man is sweet"

Country: USA | Posts: 125 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/07/2014 :  9:38:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rick,

I really like the looks of the new building. As Bob said, those open windows really add to the overall realism of the building.


Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3

Country: USA | Posts: 29724 Go to Top of Page

wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 03/08/2014 :  08:02:21 AM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very nice structure, Rick. It fills the space nicely. What will happen to the old one? WIll you recycle that somewhere else on the layout?

Chuck



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MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 03/08/2014 :  09:00:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well done Rick! As everyone has already said, those open windows make it! And the clerestory really changes it. Looking great! Now we can look forward to seeing the final application of scenic textures in Market Street!

Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13239 Go to Top of Page

Harsco
Fireman



Posted - 03/08/2014 :  09:49:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, guys...after lots of futzing, I've finally satisfied with the outcome.

Pete: not as much invective on this one since I was put on notice by the CFO...or I make sure to turn the volume down....LOL

Chuck: I'll have to look around the layout to see if a filler building is needed somewhere; if not, it'll be offered up to my compadres or stripped of any glued on details and simply round filed (one of the beauties of cardstock modeling!)

Mark: it's starting to look that way; still need to finish up the parking areas, then sprinkle on Market Street itself....although very much a hardcore industrial scene, it does need a few trees here and there.



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