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Author Topic Next Topic: Projects in Progress on the Southern Central RR
Page: of 93

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 09/15/2015 :  7:45:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's a tease
The prototype from the Sumpter Valley and as modeled by Ron Harr


Download Attachment: OES page 2a.jpg
56.21 KB


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 09/15/2015 :  9:51:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
It's a classic!

_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 3958 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 09/16/2015 :  3:09:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes Mike, She truly is. And she is the perfect choice for my Railroad. I didn't want a typical round tank and while the V&T, the Central and Southern Pacific used square tanks in their early days none seemed just right. Tell I saw this one. Philip Zamzow was kind enough to share plans with me for this tank so I will build two with slight variations (of course)to supply water to my road's steamers.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 09/22/2015 :  6:15:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, got a little scenery work done.
That is, I added more pink foam to give support to the structures and fill in the holes in the base and took more study shoots.



The brown building in between the machine shop and the slaughter house is a stand-in for the blacksmith house. Some closer views,







It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 09/22/2015 :  6:26:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That roundhouse looks familiar :-)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7094 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 09/24/2015 :  11:07:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm glad you can spot it behind the shop.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 10/14/2015 :  01:30:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This last weekend I had the pleasure attending the 6th Annual Virginia and Truckee History Conference. It was a lot of fun and enjoyed the programs and it was so nice to see everybody again and although the emphasis was on History and not modeling I learn much to improve my modeling. Let me share some of the highlights.
Charlie Siebenthal opened the conference with a discussion on “Early V&T Train Dispatching” in which he talked about not only dispatching but the daily operations of the railroad in its early days. Some of the points that were key to me was first, the paradigm that unlike most western railroad that were built into a wilderness, the V&T was built into a existing large town to serve existing mines and to take the ore to mills also already in existence on the Carson River. This is why they started building in Virginia City and Carson City rather than Reno and it explains the roundabout route they had to take. Also important is to understand that the biggest freight item wasn’t ore but was Timber and cord wood into the mines. Timber that was flumed down to the Carson River. At First the Railroad had just 5 locomotives but they carefully laid out the spurs to the mines and mills so that gravity could serve as a 6th engine. Cars were regularly unloaded from the mainline while the 5 engines handled 14 trains plus extras and 2nd sections a day.
On Saturday Jim Wilke and Jon Davis Talked about the Painting of the Central Pacific built Dayton and Columbus engines after Mike Collins discussed their history. Buy the way, all these programs were presented with projected images of the subject.
On Saturday after the convention program I went over to Nevada State Railroad Museum. They are restoring a couple of cars. One of which is a flatcar that the Railroad later turned into a tunnel repair car. They had removed the decking allowing me to see the framing of the car from the top. Because of the way this car was built I believe this flatcar is a survivor from the 1870’s but can’t prove it at this time.
Notice how the trust rods wrap through the frame;

One side of the side sill had been repaired by the railroad. Notice also the lack of paint on the interior frame members;

On Sunday we toured Virginia City were the Freight house still stands. It is owned now by a private individual who opened it up for us. Check out the nails in the decking which was 3x12’s;

Here a shot of the interior. Notice that the door lift straight up;

We ended the weekend by going down to depot of the tourist line and watching the steam engine arrive.



It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 10/14/2015 :  07:33:51 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Bob,

Great photos. Lot of interesting details in the car construction, including the spliced side sill. Sounds like a great convention.

Mike



_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 3958 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 10/14/2015 :  10:19:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
We ended the weekend by going down to depot of the tourist line and watching the steam engine arrive.

Bob, any pictures?



Country: USA | Posts: 4719 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 10/14/2015 :  12:31:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Frank Palmer

We ended the weekend by going down to depot of the tourist line and watching the steam engine arrive.

Bob, any pictures?



Frank, here's a couple;




I love steam engines and I'm glad the tourist line is there but it's not the V&T that I love,
Look at that heavy rail, the point switches and the beautiful logging connie... oh well, it's steam and it's alive and that is good and a lot better than a naked roadbed.


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 10/14/2015 :  1:00:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's three more of the flat





It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

CavalryTrooper25
Crew Chief

Posted - 10/14/2015 :  1:23:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Interesting that they used mortise, and tenon joints for the side frame, end beam joints, held together by tension on threaded bars, and probably also the truss rods.

Horse



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masonamerican
Fireman



Posted - 10/14/2015 :  4:29:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very interesting, thanks Bob! Interesting to see that there doesn't seem to be a shred of paint on the inside of framing.

What had Jim and Jon to say on the painting of the Dayton and Columbus?

Thanks
Håkan



Country: Sweden | Posts: 1664 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 10/15/2015 :  12:35:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by masonamerican


What had Jim and Jon to say on the painting of the Dayton and Columbus?



They said;


For those who are new here; Jim and Jon make a good team. Jim does the research and Jon does the graphic modeling. The result is, as seen above, spectacular! It is also extremely helpful to us modelers. Jim's talk emphasized the evidence that the railroad maintained much of the original scroll work and stripping on the engine though out the multiple repairs, rebuilds and routine maintenance this engine required as a result of wrecks and normal wear at least into the 20th century. In one incident the tender was just about totally destroyed. In the rebuilt it lost the beautiful "speed" apron around it's tender decking (the Columbus was able to keep her's through her working life)but the stripping was restored as applied by the Central Pacific shops who built her. She is so beautiful.


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4692 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/15/2015 :  1:54:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
1 picture is worth 10,000 words!

thanks! dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7094 Go to Top of Page
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