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 SierraWest - #305 O Scale Wood Cutters Shack
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Author Previous Topic: SierraWest - Mill Engine & Boiler House Topic Next Topic: bar mills springfield depot
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Geezer
Engineer



Posted - 04/04/2011 :  6:10:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well...I primered all the details today and applied "Blacken-it" to the metal castings as well. Pictures of that, when I get a bit more done....
Meanwhile, I been messin with cedar shingles. The process is new to me (in modeling), Ihope they turn out ok.....



I will post more when I get the roof done...
Having a hard time with the window install.... aI don't have any depth perception and mistakes abound!
Anyway, I hope you like the attempt at shingling....first time for the Geezer - I'll be back!




Country: USA | Posts: 12973 Go to Top of Page

ETinBH
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/04/2011 :  6:24:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am not a good judge when it comes to roofs - and this is a new concept as opposed to the shingle strips - I will be interested just how you end up with them a since I will be building this kit real soon. Nice progress imho.

Elliott

Country: USA | Posts: 4394 Go to Top of Page

Frederic Testard
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/04/2011 :  6:56:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Shingling seems OK, Bill. The point is to avoid any evidence of the white subroof but the way the shingles overlap, it seems you'll have no problem with this.



Country: France | Posts: 17652 Go to Top of Page

visman48
Fireman



Posted - 04/04/2011 :  7:22:03 PM  Show Profile  Visit visman48's Homepage  Click to see visman48's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Geez,
Roof looks sweeeeeeeeeeeet...its the way I did mine on the building flat project. I did not do a edge board, only because I was working with a roof that had roofing materials. I like the look.

Les



Country: USA | Posts: 6031 Go to Top of Page

BigLars
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/04/2011 :  8:05:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Bill,
Nice work your are doing on your retirement project; I like the shingles. Good to see you working on a group build. Careful of that Karl guy he is often trying to teach new tricks.
Larry



Country: USA | Posts: 11871 Go to Top of Page

Geezer
Engineer



Posted - 04/04/2011 :  9:22:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for comments & encouragement guys!!! I need
the "shove" to keep me going. The shingles come in
a 3 x 5 sheet that I cut to the initial width of 1/4"
and 1/8" nominal width. When I apply them, I sometimes
need to split them to a smaller size. But, it's all fun,
and a great learning experience for me. Thanks again
for the push....I will try to live up to the task....



Country: USA | Posts: 12973 Go to Top of Page

Locoman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/05/2011 :  08:32:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bill, the shingles are looking just fine. They can be a little more even, but it all depends on the overall look you are trying to achieve. The edge board is a good idea and the color/size stager is good. what will you do at the ridge. Depending on what you do could make or break the whole look. Suggest you search and look at some old building photos. Having fun is what it's all about.


Country: USA | Posts: 1572 Go to Top of Page

Geezer
Engineer



Posted - 04/05/2011 :  12:59:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Jim....the "uneven" shingles are intentional.
I guess I coulda used a "story board" or set
the weather screws on the hatchet for 5" weather and set the
weather on them in a straignt line....But, Ol vergil
(the woodcutter)tends to have a "sip" now & then, even
while roofing.....
Anyway,I am considering individual ridge caps... I will
est a few, using tacky glue, just "fire for effect". If I
can't live with that, then I will rip a couple long strips
and just butt them at the top.....finished up the shingling
this morning.....

For some reason, I cant post the other picture - flip side of the roof....I will try later. THanks for all the tips & advice guys.....



Country: USA | Posts: 12973 Go to Top of Page

Geezer
Engineer



Posted - 04/05/2011 :  1:01:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yup....I'm gonna trim the shingles on the facia side ...lol!


Country: USA | Posts: 12973 Go to Top of Page

visman48
Fireman



Posted - 04/05/2011 :  3:02:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit visman48's Homepage  Click to see visman48's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Geez,
I did a typical roofing cap as per some sort of standard starting from the middle working either way with single single over the middle. Of course you could put a some metal foil down the middle to work as a cap.

On hind sight many of the buildings in the woods were subject to forest fires or accumulations of soot from coal and oil burners. Would it not be unusal to see a flat roof walk on top with water barrel up there? we see this on a lot of finescale miniature stuff...just thinking out of the box.

Les



Country: USA | Posts: 6031 Go to Top of Page

Geezer
Engineer



Posted - 04/05/2011 :  3:21:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Les - I just went back to your building flats thread,
and I see how you did the ridge caps. I think maybe I will go
that way as well. I held up a long strip to the top ridge,
made all the other work seem tobe for naught.
I will keep the water barrel idea in mind....would give
excuse for ladder and like you say, small platform.



Country: USA | Posts: 12973 Go to Top of Page

UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 04/05/2011 :  9:11:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
By the time the roof had burned through enough for the water barrel to fall through and hopefully 'quench' the flames the small building would be gone.
The other none sensical (for me) scenario would be someone climbing a ladder to the roof of a burning wooden building to 'ladel' water from a barrel onto the flames. Think I'd pass on that job.....

I never understood the whole 'roof barrel' thing, just doesnt seem to make sense, but thats just me.

Shingling looks good, looking forward to seeing how you weather, age and colour them.

Karl.A



Country: USA | Posts: 6292 Go to Top of Page

Locoman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/06/2011 :  09:57:28 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good Geezer, I like the process you are going thru to finalize some of these small, but important details. Acctually Geezer, the amount of stagger you have on the shinges look alot like the ones on my old house (the one that burnt down). the shinges were old, dry, splitting and starting to come off. So like Karl said, they should be well aged and weathered.

Karl, I too, don't understand the water barrels on the the roof thing. I think i need to do some research on it and see how it was suppose to work, if it worked at all. will let you all know what I find out.



Country: USA | Posts: 1572 Go to Top of Page

visman48
Fireman



Posted - 04/06/2011 :  10:23:26 AM  Show Profile  Visit visman48's Homepage  Click to see visman48's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Karl and Jim,
After I posted that, I began to wonder too what the value was...was it fire protection? was it rain water gathering and use, and if so then pipes and access would be necessary.

Geezers roof looks great, and working with those shingles makes it easy and very custom looking. The finish..painting, staining, weathering and mossing will be interesting too.

Les



Country: USA | Posts: 6031 Go to Top of Page

Locoman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/07/2011 :  10:32:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Water barrels on roof for fire protection.

I have been looking around the internet and this is what I came up with.

In the late 1800's to early 1900's the insurance companys were keeping pretty detailed lists of losses by fire and state statutes were being passed for fire sprinkler systems to be installed in buildings, espically hotels and large manufacturing buildings, etc. Small, one and two story buildings, basically low revenue operations were allowed to put rain water collection barrels on the ridge board of their roofs, with handy pail to carry water in, as a substitue for the sprinkler system. Ladders were required to get up to the ridge of the roof. There were several state supreme court decisions allowing this. Of course it didn't work very well and by the 1920's the pratice went away and more fire retardent materials were requied for the roofing and stand pipe and sprinkler systems were required.

Just as an example, take a look at the third picture down.

http://www.jonestownship.com/history/glen_hazel(2).htm

from what I have read about the logging era, most sawmills burnt down about ever 5 to 10 years or so and most were then rebuild. I guess the rain barrels was a way around the fire code of that time, but a very poor substitute for sprinkler systems. Most of the early sawmills were not insured, so they could get away with little or now fire protection.



Country: USA | Posts: 1572 Go to Top of Page
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