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Author Previous Topic: Choices Challenge: B&O Tower Kit Topic Next Topic: SierraWest - #305 O Scale Wood Cutters Shack
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TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 03/02/2011 :  07:33:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Joe

Very nice indeed. Great job on the Steam Engine.

Jerry


Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 13047 Go to Top of Page

MorganHillRR
Crew Chief

Posted - 03/02/2011 :  10:35:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks to each and all for your kind words and positive comments. Hey Kevin, a great tip, I really appreciate learning new techniques. Karl-the mill engine flooring is one of my favorite parts so far. It's one of those deals that just turned out perfectly. The light sanding makes it look so worn (thanks Brett). I'll need to dirty it up eventually.

Time to finish off the last two castings and complete the other details. Regards, Joe
CCCModOn30





Country: USA | Posts: 552 Go to Top of Page

MorganHillRR
Crew Chief

Posted - 03/05/2011 :  10:52:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello: Time for a progress update. Finished off the last 3 detail items and started to work on the interior before starting on the roof details. Completed the plumbing from boiler to engine. It's fun to see the building come to life.

I have some experience modelling ground cover, having built 4 On30 modules mainly covering lumber camp activities. I've used dirt and many commercial products and have been happy with the results.

However, I would like to try something different. I have read with interest the use of grout; many colors, sizes, techniques. Can someone lead me to a link(s) or build(s) where this is covered in reasonable detail? Thanks in advance......Joe CCCModOn30










Country: USA | Posts: 552 Go to Top of Page

onl26
Fireman

Posted - 03/05/2011 :  12:09:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Joe
I really like the job you've done with the details. Very nice rust and weathering effects. One little nitpic would be centering the glass on top of the pump. I know it seems like a small thing but it's paying attention to these kind of details that really make a superior model. You have a good feel for color and texture and I'm looking forward to more of your work. In regards to groundcover I know guys have used grout and I've seen really nice results with it but if you have a supply of good real dirt (no clay content) I would always go for the real thing first.
Kevin



Country: USA | Posts: 1283 Go to Top of Page

danpickard
Fireman

Posted - 03/05/2011 :  4:47:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit danpickard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi Joe,
Just coming back to this thread, and some of you progress is nice. It is certainly rewarding to get the different elements of the piece coming together (kind of inspires you to want to get into finishing it).

I'll second (or third maybe) the comments about the brightness of the casting. As an isolated photo of the detail casting (ie before going into the diorama), the colours may not be too bad, but once in place, they are standing out as too bold, and distarcting the eye from the overall image. Refer back to an image of some of Kevin's detail parts (or Kevin, perhaps post an additional reference image here for Joe), to see that you can use bolder colours, but then mute them back so they sit more comfortably in the final setting.

Regarding the grout question, I tend to use it as a base coating for diorama's. Depending on which brand you use, you should be able to track down a number of appropriate "ground" shades (tan brown, greys etc, just not rich dark chocolate brown...again that looks wrong). I dampen the surface (bit of "wet water" - the old water and a few drops of detergent), which can be sprayed on carefullt, painted on, or even wiped on with a rag. Its just enough to give the grout something to initially grab to. I then use a small sieve to "tap" a fine layer of the grout over the damp surface. Grout goes off with water, so you'll see it wick up the damp surface. I normally do a layer just enough to cover the bare surface. The water alone will hold it fairly well, but to be sure it will stay, set it down properly with diluted glue or matte medium. A second layer can be added, and I occasionally do the second layer with grout scooped up with an old brush, and then dusted into place (ie around building stumps, up against fence lines), and then set off with glue once happy. This gives a good base layer with a bit of tooth.

As a base layer, it can be a bit monotone though. For secondary colouring, I use a collection of dirts (powdered down in a mortar and pestle), or you can even use something like the Rembrandt chalks. Dust them across the surface to add a bit of depth to the ground colour, or create things like paths.

Feel free to ask further questions if this is hard to understand.

Cheers,
Dan Pickard


http://www.austnarrowgaugeconvention.com/

Country: Australia | Posts: 1344 Go to Top of Page

dallas_m
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/06/2011 :  12:17:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by danpickard

I'll second (or third maybe) the comments about the brightness of the casting. As an isolated photo of the detail casting (ie before going into the diorama), the colours may not be too bad, but once in place, they are standing out as too bold, and distarcting the eye from the overall image. Refer back to an image of some of Kevin's detail parts (or Kevin, perhaps post an additional reference image here for Joe), to see that you can use bolder colours, but then mute them back so they sit more comfortably in the final setting.



Same view shared here. Joe, you've taken a great deal of care in finishing the mill engine and it looks beautiful. A bit of care to tone down those details will allow that engine to really "shine" as the star of the scene.

The red, blue and green details stand out (to me) most harshly. Some blending to create more muted tones would do very well.

And further to all the discussion over constructive criticism and such -- I think there's some really outstanding work here in your diorama and "in my opinion" these touches would make it even better. Your mileage may vary!


Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!

Country: USA | Posts: 4674 Go to Top of Page

MorganHillRR
Crew Chief

Posted - 03/06/2011 :  10:06:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello: Thanks for all your positive comments and comments for improvements I can make to get this model to the next level.

Kevin- the gas pump will be fixed, I didn't realize how off it was until I looked more critically at the photo (and the casting). Thanks

Dan and Dallas- you guys are absolutely correct on the brightness of the castings. I thought I had tamed them down, but once in place they seem to need more of Kevin's chaulk technique. Thanks Dan for the tutorial on grout.

Joe CCCModOn30



Country: USA | Posts: 552 Go to Top of Page

onl26
Fireman

Posted - 03/06/2011 :  6:25:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Joe
Hope you don't mind me doing a short little bit about the castings. This barrel and oil can were primed with flat black from a can and quickly dried with a hairdryer. I know people wait over night for prime to dry but it's really not necessary if you go over it with acrylic. I used some "bright colors" brushed on. The barrel is Vallejo flat blue with off white on the top. The oil can is Vallejo vermillion with antique bronze on the top. Vallejos are great and they dry immediately but craft paints work just as well. I use Rembrandt gold ochre as a basic dusty coating and that is what you see in the second pic. Just stab it on all over the casting and blow it off. Next I used some burnt sienna for some basic rust color and a little black for some streaks. The drum top has a small brushful of Rust-all that I dry with the hairdryer and what remains is a nice light film of rust. I went over it with some burnt sienna and black. On the barrel I brushed horizontally along the ribs with a little rust color and did a few vertical streaks with the black. I use a big soft brush and lightly dust the entire casting to blend things in. I spent about 15 min. total time on both castings.
Kevin



Country: USA | Posts: 1283 Go to Top of Page

onl26
Fireman

Posted - 03/06/2011 :  6:30:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here are the pics.












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UKGuy
Fireman



Posted - 03/07/2011 :  11:07:39 AM  Show Profile  Visit UKGuy's Homepage  Send UKGuy a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Good detailed posts Dan and Kevin, precise and easy to follow.
Joe I PM'ed you last week when I noticed you searching on grout. I can give my account if you still want it after Dans post. Slight variation, though I suppose not really.

Karl.A



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visman48
Fireman



Posted - 03/07/2011 :  1:17:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit visman48's Homepage  Click to see visman48's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Joe,
I have been watching this build from the start, it has every element that all of us modelers encounter. This last page is a sure example, of detail parts that are well painted need to blended in to be part of the whole. I would lightly dust it all with either a airbrush or just some chalks, using a light tan or light gray once you have "it" all done. When light is put on and dusted off it blends color.

I use the sanded grout extensively. I am using light tan, and another tan that is just a bit browner. I put it down dry with a spoon, sifting it in place then moving it around with a soft fluffy paint brush. Lastly using a cheap house painting brush like 2" wide type..I touch directly down on it...to get the soft edges out. I use a very fine misting sprayer..to wet, then I wet with glue. sometimes I add dry over the wet and it does some interesting things.

Les



Country: USA | Posts: 6031 Go to Top of Page

MorganHillRR
Crew Chief

Posted - 03/07/2011 :  1:59:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello: Hey Kevin, I really like your castings and I very much appreciate you taking the time to show me your techniques. I copied the tutorial and photos for later usage.

Les- thanks for the input on blending and grout. I'm definately going to try grout as a learning experience.

and Karl, I'm sorry I missed your PM, I guess I'm not used to checking that little area up top. I found some detailed grout info on your O Scale Tool Shed (#302) build which should be very useful. Any other info on the subject would be very much appreciated.

Joe in Morgan Hill, CA CCCModOn30



Country: USA | Posts: 552 Go to Top of Page

danpickard
Fireman

Posted - 03/07/2011 :  5:59:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit danpickard's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hi Joe,
Just to further add a bit of reference to the grout info, here's a photo of one of my diorama's with the grout base, followed by selective highlighting with some ground dirt. The dirt I used is actually a very heavy clay soil. Someone mentioned not to use clay soils, but on the contrary, if you can get them wet (wet water mix), once they dry again, they harden as a clay again, and generally sit well on the base (especially if it has the grout layer to adhere too). Not the greatest photo of the surface, but gives the idea of the colour variations.




I actually have a newer diorama I'm doing at the minute, which might show the effect better, with a grout layer, and then 3 different grades of dirt colouring (all sampled from the same terrain cutting out in the bush). No photo's of it yet, but I'll be working on it at a show this weekend, so should get some shots then.

Cheers,
Dan Pickard


http://www.austnarrowgaugeconvention.com/

Country: Australia | Posts: 1344 Go to Top of Page

onl26
Fireman

Posted - 03/07/2011 :  6:13:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That looks great Dan and I had mentioned not using clay but mostly because in my area in the Northeast it is usually too red.
Kevin



Country: USA | Posts: 1283 Go to Top of Page

MorganHillRR
Crew Chief

Posted - 03/08/2011 :  10:15:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Dan: Thanks for the photo; I'm with Kevin the base and diorama look terrific. I really like the texture. Look forward to seeing your new project...Joe CCCModOn30


Country: USA | Posts: 552 Go to Top of Page
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