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Author Previous Topic: Scenery Topic Next Topic: Subroadbed, Roadbed and Track
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MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/21/2010 :  10:48:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Rick

Mark, aren't you glad I mentioned the ceiling?



Really! This is interesting though. A lot of good ideas floating around. Of course, a big factor in my decision will be cost as well. SteamNut and I talked today and while I won't be installing any ceiling tiles for several months, it's time to investigate some of these ideas.

To me, this is an important topic though for a couple of reasons. First, appearance. I am fortunate enough to have a deep basement, so once the ceiling is installed, it can be flat with no funny boxes, beams or pipes sticking out. As I've said, I plan to paint it black, along with the fascia, to create a museum like diorama effect. I have seen this before and it is dramatic how the layout jumps out at you with no other distractions.

The second reason is cleanliness. No dust or dirt creeping down from the upper floors. As has been mentioned, I've all but ruled out the pressed paper tiles. The fiberglass and foam tile ideas are appealing, as are the ideas of sheetrock or plywood. They all have merit.

Stay tuned!


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13474 Go to Top of Page

Harsco
Fireman



Posted - 01/21/2010 :  11:11:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Not trying to sound like Freddy Firefighter, but I would be especially leery about using styrofoam or any high or low density plastic material. Aside from being the closest thing to gasoline in a solid form, these materials produce a LOT of very nasty, highly toxic smoke when heated. Ceiling surfaces should retard the spread of fire and smoke, NOT help it spread. The fiberglass panels aren't a whole lot better, but are an improvement. Wallboard is the best, but not always an option depending on the circumstances. Just my two cents..


Country: USA | Posts: 1320 Go to Top of Page

RSCo
Section Hand



Posted - 01/22/2010 :  04:10:29 AM  Show Profile  Visit RSCo's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Rick, it figures then that the fire inspector failed me for not having the styrofoam panels in the offices of my old cabinet shop. Apparently, the pretty fire-resistant panels that I had replaced the crappy foam ones with wouldn't fall out fast enough if the sprinklers activated. Then again, I don't think anyone would run in to an empty industrial building with a flat roof supported by wooded trusses and full of drums of solvents and other nasty stuff to put out the fire, so it was a moot point.

I do agree with the sheetrock thing, especially if you have the height for a nice flat ceiling - which most people don't. Don't get hung up on not having access to the first floor later, chances are you will never need it, and if you do, you can usually figure out another way.


Jim Musser
Hainesport, NJ
blog - http://mussersteelmill.blogspot.com

Country: USA | Posts: 76 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/22/2010 :  09:07:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, while we are talking about ceilings, I continued to make some progress and got some work done on the floor. With the construction out of the way, I'm now doing the 'big cleanup' and floor painting. That involves getting on your hands and knees and giving the concrete floor a good cleaning of construction debris, then applying a good heavy coat of floor paint. I made a lot of progress yesterday and have most of the outside perimeter of the floor done. The next step is to set up all the steel shelving along the side wall of the basement and begin the unpacking.

My knees and back are killing me! I keep saying to myself, 'all this for trains'?


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13474 Go to Top of Page

racedirector
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/22/2010 :  09:26:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit racedirector's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MarkF

.... I keep saying to myself, 'all this for trains'?


LOL! I know exactly what you mean, I am currently walling up my garage in preparation for my new layout and have most of it's contents on the back lawn. 43.5C today and higher tomorrow yet I still have a wall to finish before I can start putting stuff back in. We have thunderstorms forecast tomorrow afternoon so no rest from the heat for me!

Your layout room is looking fantastic, wish mine looked as good. Will follow the layout building bit with interest...

Cheers



Bruce Nordstrand, Riverstone, NSW, Oz-stralia

Back in HO...and stayin there!

Country: Australia | Posts: 333 Go to Top of Page

dnhman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/22/2010 :  09:31:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark the room looks great,, Good luck with the floor. Question are you removing the old paint from floor or just painting over it? It seems like a an aweful messy and painful job..
I painted over the old floor and it never really took well
;(


Cheers!, Joe

Country: USA | Posts: 1096 Go to Top of Page

Brunton
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/22/2010 :  11:45:02 AM  Show Profile  Visit Brunton's Homepage  Reply with Quote
So Mark, when will you be updating your website with some of this new work?


Country: USA | Posts: 497 Go to Top of Page

pcmatt
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/22/2010 :  3:42:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark-always enjoy your updates. So, are we looking at ops session by end of year? Had to ask. LOL

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=26375

Country: USA | Posts: 217 Go to Top of Page

MIKE0659
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/22/2010 :  11:33:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit MIKE0659's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Mark,

Great to see some progress.

We put up the ceiling tiles, then noticed the dust (I referred to it as "snowing"). We bought some water-based polyurethane and rollered it on over the layout to seal them. We didn't seal the aisles as it slightly discolors the tiles and we weren't worried about the dust from the aisles. Using white or black paint would do the same job.

The only downside to the hard compound tiles (Plywood, masonite, plastic, etc.) is they reflect sound pretty well. The regular tiles also help keep down the sound from the always subdued, never loud guys in the basement, and keep it from going upstairs.

Two cents worth.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 160 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/23/2010 :  02:10:29 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dnhman

Mark the room looks great,, Good luck with the floor. Question are you removing the old paint from floor or just painting over it?


Joe, the floor had never been painted or sealed. It was clean, or about as clean as a concrete floor can be, but after all the construction work, it got fairly messed up. So section by section, I cleaned it fairly well, then painted. A long process to be sure, but the end result will be worth it!

quote:
Originally posted by Brunton
So Mark, when will you be updating your website with some of this new work?



One of these days! That is actually a project I have been working on as well. Hopefully in the next couple of weeks. Frankly, most of the page on the new layout will be similar to what I'm posting here.

quote:
Originally posted by prrmatt
So, are we looking at ops session by end of year? Had to ask. LOL



Ah, don't laugh too hard. Believe it or not, that is one of my goals! I would love to have some sort of limited operation capability by the end of the year. We will have to see. Maybe by my birthday, right Bruce?


Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13474 Go to Top of Page

Grubes
Crew Chief



Posted - 01/23/2010 :  09:26:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark,

You've provided such encouragement to so many here. Now it's our turn. Keep it up through the non-railroad stuff as all your hard work will make the room that much more enjoyable to operate the railroad.

Yes, "all for trains," nothing wrong with that!

Dave



Country: USA | Posts: 538 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/23/2010 :  6:28:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'd strongly recommend you put something on top of the cement floor. What I have (as recommended by my-brother-the-carpenter) is a grid of 1x4 pressure treated glued to the concrete with Liquid Nails. The grid has spaces in between the 1x4 to allow air to circulate there. Then there's 3/4 PT tongue and groove plywood screwed (1" drywall screws) into the grid. Then I applied floor leveler and peel-and-stick vinyl tiles. This makes a very attractive floor, the tiles I chose show little tiny parts (NBW castings, even!) pretty well. But much more importantly, you can stand on this for -a lot longer- more comfortably than you can on concrete.

If you decide to stay with the concrete floor, you should buy those rubber "puzzle assembly" tiles and lay those over the passageways where people will walk after the benchwork is in place.

Your feet will thank me, and so will your back when you get a little bit older :-) :-)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 01/23/2010 6:30:34 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 6490 Go to Top of Page

Steam Nut
Fireman



Posted - 01/24/2010 :  10:50:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There is only one problem we have with those rubber puzzle matts. The static! We has that here in south jersey and had to send a Digitrax home to be fixed after a zap while pluging it in. If you put them down then you can put a carpet runner over them and that takes care of it.


Country: USA | Posts: 1757 Go to Top of Page

dnhman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/24/2010 :  11:06:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes my DT400 was never the same,, and if you recall Bruce evryone was zapped multiple times,,,arrrgghhh

Cheers!, Joe

Country: USA | Posts: 1096 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/24/2010 :  11:23:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Steam Nut

There is only one problem we have with those rubber puzzle matts. The static! We has that here in south jersey and had to send a Digitrax home to be fixed after a zap while pluging it in. If you put them down then you can put a carpet runner over them and that takes care of it.


Ooh, didn't know that. One thing that would help is a humidifier. Did the zapfest happen in the winter? (A humidifier will also make humans more comfortable.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 6490 Go to Top of Page
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