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[ Active Members: 2 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 138 ]  [ Total: 140 ]  [ Newest Member: Coaltower ]
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 Fascia color
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Author Previous Topic: Has anyone tried Blue-Point manual turnout control Topic Next Topic: respirator for airbrushing
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lab-dad
Fireman



Posted - 07/24/2006 :  1:09:37 PM  Show Profile  Visit lab-dad's Homepage  Send lab-dad a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
I voted other.
On my N scale layout I used dark green, but felt it distracted from the layout "scene"
I have seen black facias with black valances I like - forms a shadowbox.
But on my current layout there is no facia, the scenry goes to the floor - sheer cliffs
-Marty



Country: USA | Posts: 1543 Go to Top of Page

leeflan
Fireman

Posted - 07/24/2006 :  1:13:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm in the dark green camp. Since I model the Deep South, the layout has a lot of greenery. I've always felt that a nice dark green satin(hunter, forest, etc.) sets off the scenery very nicely. I also paint my benchwork green, but flat.


Country: USA | Posts: 2441 Go to Top of Page

Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 07/24/2006 :  1:34:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I voted black, flat black as my fascia works with my valence and curtains (all black) to accentuate the layout. All that is seen by the eye in my layout room is the well-lit scenery of New England.

Great poll, Mike. I remember an earlier Great Model Railroads issue (one of the first ones) that delved into the topic of fascias, their colours and the materials used...I'll have to check that out again as I remember it being an interesting read!


Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

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Mario Rapinett
Fireman



Posted - 07/24/2006 :  6:38:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mike Hamer

I voted black, flat black as my fascia works with my valence and curtains (all black) to accentuate the layout.




ditto



Download Attachment: Chamatiago 2004 015.jpg
103.25 KB

BTW.. this layout was completely dismantled last week.... no longer exists....



.
http://www.modvid.com.au/html/body_railroad_miniatures.html

Country: Australia | Posts: 5798 Go to Top of Page

Mike Hamer
Engineer



Posted - 07/24/2006 :  6:40:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mike Hamer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hey Mario...that was one beautiful layout. What was the reason for the dismantling?

Mike Hamer
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca
http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca
http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

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MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 07/24/2006 :  6:56:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Barry, thanks for the complements! You probably don't have the problems 'down under' that we do here in good 'ole New Jersey, but where I live, we have a high 'water table', meaning that when it rains headvily, or even during the winter when the water doesn't get a chance to 'dry off', the water level in the ground rises. Where I live, the water level can be as shallow as 6' below ground level. If you have a basement that is deeper than 6' and don't have the proper drainage system, you'll find several inches of water over your basement floor! That was my problem. A french drain is a pipe with holes in it placed under the floor around the perimeter of your basement. It drains into a sump, or a hole in the floor that is several feet deep. In turn, there is a pump that activates to pump the water that is drained off out to the street or a local storm drain.

Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13726 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 07/24/2006 :  6:58:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Joe, thanks for the complement! I think you'll like it!

Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13726 Go to Top of Page

Mario Rapinett
Fireman



Posted - 07/24/2006 :  7:39:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mike Hamer

reason for the dismantling?



Just moving on in life and getting rid of some baggage. It's a good feeling. Not everything has to be black in this world..

"M"


.
http://www.modvid.com.au/html/body_railroad_miniatures.html

Country: Australia | Posts: 5798 Go to Top of Page

anbhurst
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 07/25/2006 :  12:55:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Actually any dark earth tone would do for me. In addition, Payne's Gray or Black could be used as well.

quote:
Originally posted by Cigarguy





Allen
Modeling the East in the West on the Northeastern Pacific RIM, Oregon, that is!

Country: USA | Posts: 7259 Go to Top of Page

RichBeau
Fireman



Posted - 07/25/2006 :  06:58:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The color of the fascia of Georgestown is a neutral sand color.

In most cases I find that a neutral flat, fascia color complements scenery while colors that are too bright or dark tend to draw attention away from the scenes.

I find that unless the operator's aisle is dimly lit then a black fascia is just too stark. If the viewing area and aisles are minimally lit then I find that the black fascia works well as it creates a shadowbox or theatrical stage appearance.

If the layout room is evenly lit then the black just detracts while a neutral color seems to disappear. Most of the layouts that use neutral colors (David Barrow's Cat Mountain being the most well know) tend to have a color that is appropriate with the geographic area modeled. IOW a layout in the eastern Appalachian forest generally has a green fascia. And a layout located out west tends to have the a fascia of earth tones.

Lastly I find the finished furniture look, while attractive in it's own right and sometimes to be of exquisite construction, in most cases is also a distraction since it's the layout that should be the featured performer

I guess I'm in the minority here.
--Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 2702 Go to Top of Page

bpate
Fireman



Posted - 07/25/2006 :  09:15:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mark, Thanks for the explanation. Many years ago I saw something similar to what you describe.

Mario, sad to hear Chamatiago is no more. I saw that at Sunbury and really liked it.



Country: Australia | Posts: 3090 Go to Top of Page

Cigarguy
Fireman



Posted - 07/25/2006 :  09:31:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rich, it is ok to be in a minority. Remember, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and there is no right or wrong answer, just personal preference.

I have seen some layouts that have the "finished paneling" fascia, and they looked great. I have also seen others done the same way where that paneling really distracted from the layout, as you described. I wonder how much the setting of the layout has to do with how well the fascia looks when finished in a certain way.

Thanks for responding to the poll.



Mike
D&B Lumber Co.
"The Best Wood You Ever Saw!"

Country: USA | Posts: 3894 Go to Top of Page

LandNnut
Fireman



Posted - 09/08/2006 :  8:20:51 PM  Show Profile  Visit LandNnut's Homepage  Reply with Quote
L&N Passenger Dark Blue for me

Jon R. Gearhart



Country: USA | Posts: 1608 Go to Top of Page

MIKE0659
Engine Wiper

Posted - 09/08/2006 :  11:32:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We went with a medium gray, semi-gloss for both the fascia and the valance. In places they connect so we just went with the same color on both. The backside of the valance is white to reflect the light. We picked the gray because it is a neutral color that won't draw the eye from the scene. We didn't go darker because then the room just starts looking too dark.

We went semi-gloss because we knew we would be leaning against it and brushing up against it. If it was flat, specially flat back, it would show marks from all that contact. There is a narrow spot in one of our aisles that pretty much everyone slides through, brushing one side or the other, and even with all those belt buckles, zippers and other things sliding along it, there are no visible marks. And when we slobber stuff on it while doing scenery, we can clean it up with a wet rag.

The gray has drawn favorable comments from visitors.






Country: USA | Posts: 161 Go to Top of Page

Cigarguy
Fireman



Posted - 09/09/2006 :  06:21:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike, you are correct in that the flat certainly does show the scuffs more than the semi-gloss. Nice work on your layout - have you thought about posting some additional photos of it in the "Overall view of your layout room" thread? We'd like to see more!

Mike
D&B Lumber Co.
"The Best Wood You Ever Saw!"

Country: USA | Posts: 3894 Go to Top of Page
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