Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Beefy Shay

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • robert_goslin
    replied
    Excellent work Dave. Shays really are a such a special / quirky looking loco. Looks like you have really gone to a lot of trouble to get it right.
    And of course, all the extra info provided by Jeff should clarify anything you're not sure about.
    There are so many knowledgeable people here, willing to help. Nice to see.

    Keep up the excellent work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Coaltrain
    replied
    I was hoping not to come across as "critical" in a bad way. I really liked your model and was hoping to just share what I have learned from my shay project. Two years ago I knew very little about shays and when I decided to try and 3D print one I learned just how little I knew. I find that building models is easier when I know what it is that I am building. In this particular case of the "pipe" knowing what it connects makes it easier to know when it fits. When I started making 3D models I quickly learned how lacking and confusing most model press drawings are, and building from them is almost impossible. The California Railroad Museum has lots of the Lima Shay drawings used in fabrication the real shays and I found it was better to purchase those drawings. I also took a few trips to see and measure some real shays, and that was a real eye opener to how they really look compared to models, both brass and plastic. "Is all that detail and accuracy important?", maybe not, maybe to some more than others. Most little things can be just close enough, but some of the bigger more visible items draw more attention and maybe accuracy on those is more important. In the end you could have piped it to the headlight and it would have still run fine and be a fun model to see. You build a great model and kitbashing and scratch building is alive and well with you, keep up the good work and keep posting.

    Leave a comment:


  • Philip
    replied
    Looking great Dave!

    All my Shay's are screwd & now need attention.

    Leave a comment:


  • TRAINS1941
    commented on 's reply
    Well if you want to do it live steam! I'd be more than happy to take the electric one off your hands!!

  • Dave_D
    replied
    Thanks Jerry and Larry.


    OK, I get it Jeff,

    I now know a lot more about Shays, maybe more than I wanted to.

    Thanks for taking the time.

    Let it never be said that I cant take criticism and learn or don't care about getting it right, (at least close to looking right anyway.)








    Click image for larger version  Name:	DSCF8090ed.jpg Views:	0 Size:	86.6 KB ID:	994724


    Now granted I didn't attach them to the cylinders but then I don't need to, its electric not live steam.

    OK I'm putting the pipes behind me and focusing on other details.
    I'm hoping to tie this up soon.


    Cheers,

    Dave




    Leave a comment:


  • Larryc
    replied
    Dave looks good to me; great job as usual.

    Leave a comment:


  • TRAINS1941
    replied
    Jeff a great lesson on how that all works.

    Leave a comment:


  • TRAINS1941
    replied
    Outstanding job Dave!

    Leave a comment:


  • Coaltrain
    replied
    The reason that drawing of the piping looks like it is one pipe that runs from the dome to the smoke box is because the cylinder block in one casting. Inside the casting are passages, just like a car engine block has piston holes and water passages that are separate from each other. The cylinders each have a valve on them that moves with the stroke and tells the cylinder to take in live steam from the dome, or it blocks off the live steam and sends the used steam (condensate) down the exhaust pipe. The exhaust steam has to enter the smokebox in the very center, right under the exhaust stack because there is a nozzle that "shoots" the used steam up into the smoke stack, and the "shooting" causes a low pressure area around the stack that draws the firebox gasses through the flues and up the stack. Sometimes the exhaust steam pipe (it runs down the side of the boiler) enters the side of the smokebox and has an internal pipe (the drop pipe) that goes down the the center of the smoke box and then turns up, otherwise you the external exhaust pipe will turn on the outside of the boiler and go down and under the smokebox were it enters the bottom center.

    here is an image that shows the casting that looks like a pipe in your drawing.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	SHAY CYLINDER BLOCK.jpg
Views:	49
Size:	189.8 KB
ID:	994677

    here is the cylinder block outlined and the steam flow sketched in
    Click image for larger version

Name:	SHAY CYLINDER BLOCK 2.jpg
Views:	46
Size:	180.1 KB
ID:	994678

    if you look at a superheated shay, like some on the Westside Lumber, you will have two external pipes, which both are attached to the smokebox and not to the steam dome. A superheated shay has a lot of little steam pipes that run through the flues and they use exhaust gasses to heat the steam to a higher temp (making more pressure). the steam is collected in the dome and has an internal pipe that branches off to all the little pipes, which makes a loop that ends at the front of the boiler and is recollected to a pipe. The collection pipe exits the side of the smokebox (up high) and runs back to the cylinder block to be sent to the cylinders, same as before, and the used steam runs back to the smoke box in a separate pipe that is down lower so it drains toward the front and can "shoot" the exhaust steam up through the center bottom of the smokebox and up through the stack. it is sometimes hard to see the lower pipe because it can be behind air tanks and running boards.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	ws1.jpg
Views:	46
Size:	76.7 KB
ID:	994679

    Click image for larger version

Name:	ws2.jpg
Views:	46
Size:	81.4 KB
ID:	994680

    Leave a comment:


  • CNE1899
    replied
    Dave,
    Great little locomotive! Details and paint are looking good. You hardly notice the 3 spots.

    Scott

    Leave a comment:


  • Philip
    replied
    Look great Dave!

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave_D
    commented on 's reply
    That was odd. I hit edit and there they were. I hit save and boom gone. lol
    I deleted them and reloaded.

  • Rick
    commented on 's reply
    Dave, your pictures don't show.

  • Rick
    commented on 's reply
    Dave, your pictures don't show

  • Dave_D
    replied
    Thanks for the comments guys.

    Jerry, yeah it's around here.....somewhere. lol


    I had a bit of a struggle the last few days.
    I blasted the rear water tank/fuel bunker after the gloss incident and repainted it.
    Then I overdid the sand colored over spray, back to the blaster.
    Then I repainted and added the TCB and rivet decals. Engineers side, perfect, The fireman's side clouded
    after the dull cote was applied, back to the blaster.
    This last time I got it to the same point as the last time, fireman's side perfect, engineers side, 3 small spots.
    I'm going to end this crazy cycle here.


    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF8079ed.jpg
Views:	54
Size:	92.9 KB
ID:	994587




    I have a white metal casting of a siphon hose that hides those spots pretty well.
    I'll paint that up and hang it there. The only thing I can think of is my decal sheet is pretty old maybe that has something to do with it.


    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF8082ed.jpg
Views:	54
Size:	103.9 KB
ID:	994588



    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF8081ed.jpg
Views:	53
Size:	92.8 KB
ID:	994589


    That's where I'm at.

    More to do, steps, grabs, handles for the fill covers, front number plate, crew are just a few things that come to mind plus a few more detail bits.
    DCC/Sound has been installed and works great. I'm in the home stretch I think!

    Cheers, Dave
    Last edited by Dave_D; 05-17-2022, 04:50 PM.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X