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  • Bernd
    replied
    Originally posted by Carl_B View Post
    Anybody that isn't comfortable working with getting a computer to control a CNC machine, such as a beginner is going to have a hard time.

    I appreciate this statement of honesty Bernd. If only others would do the same.....namely the proliferation of "You Tube" producers...
    Carl,

    I lay it on the line in situations like this. When you sell a machine that they say can cut aluminum an it stalls the spindle motor, there's a problem. There fix was hang a bigger motor on it. Wrong. Same goes for those speeds and feeds they say to use. None of them have spent time running a several ton cast iron machine that is ridged. Once I figure out what the hell is wrong with this thing I'll post an answer. If it really pisses me off I use it as a boat anchor this summer at the Islands. Now, do you really want me to tell you what I think?

    I never ever considered myself as an expert in the machining field but after this adventure I might be changing my tune.

    At this point if you'd ask me what to get to do some machining I'd tell you to get a Sherline. At least they come with a manual and instructions on how to program the machine in understandable English.

    Bernd (frustrated and going to have an adult beverage before bed.)

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  • Bernd
    replied
    Originally posted by rrladmin View Post
    Bernd, funny you mention GRBL .. i think that my X Carve uses that... well, you can always run the program with no cutter.. just to see if it runs correctly.. that way you really only have to worry about the z
    joe
    I've been doing that. One of the biggest problem is that communicating with the people a Comgrow. They can't speak English. I'm sure you know what I mean. There explanation is with a Chinese mind set translated to English. Things get lost in the translation. I'm not tanking any prisoners when it comes to asking questions of the manufacturer. I think I need to walk away form the machine for a while and get back to working on the engine house. I'm also thinking of seeing what I can want to do will be transferred to the Sherline.

    Right now I'm a little hot under the collar. Time for an adult beverage.

    Bernd

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  • Carl_B
    replied
    Anybody that isn't comfortable working with getting a computer to control a CNC machine, such as a beginner is going to have a hard time.

    I appreciate this statement of honesty Bernd. If only others would do the same.....namely the proliferation of "You Tube" producers...

    Leave a comment:


  • rrladmin
    replied
    Bernd, funny you mention GRBL .. i think that my X Carve uses that... well, you can always run the program with no cutter.. just to see if it runs correctly.. that way you really only have to worry about the z
    joe

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  • Bernd
    replied
    Originally posted by rrladmin View Post
    Bernd, usually home has its own set of switches... or could be limit switches it will travel to them when you start the machine, sense when you hit them, then call it home. id always recommend limit switches so you dont overtravel and bend or break something.

    i am using flash cut on my sherline mill .. older but it works well

    centroid on all the bridgeports ... until i get my HAAS that is

    joe
    These little machine work in weird way. They have limit switches but are only for over travel. Remember these are hobby machines. The ROBO is a crowd funded project and put together by people who have no idea about machining.

    My Sherline runs on Lunix EMC2 and has no home position switches. The first thing I need to do is zero all the axis on the Sherline before they move. They can be run into a hard stop. They have a ratchet type over run so no damage there.

    On this CNC router the only switches on there are for over travel. The big problem is no instructions in what they call the manual. They slap these machines together and have no concept of proper documentation and what all the buttons do. Same goes for the software documentation. I'm basically learning buy just pushing buttons and clicking icons to see what they do with one hand on the off switch. Problem is I know more about machining than all the different software's that run these machines. I've never heard of GRBL or flame before in control software. But I'm learning. Frustrating at times but I won't let them win. I'll figure it out if I have destroy several milling cutters in the process.

    More fun to come. Stay tuned.

    Bernd

    Leave a comment:


  • rrladmin
    replied
    Bernd, usually home has its own set of switches... or could be limit switches it will travel to them when you start the machine, sense when you hit them, then call it home. id always recommend limit switches so you dont overtravel and bend or break something.

    i am using flash cut on my sherline mill .. older but it works well

    centroid on all the bridgeports ... until i get my HAAS that is

    joe

    Leave a comment:


  • Bernd
    replied
    Originally posted by BurleyJim View Post
    Bernd, Here is an excellent guide you might want to use as a reference. Chapter 7 gets into G Codes in understandable terms.

    https://www.haascnc.com/content/dam/...ual---2017.pdf

    Jim
    Thanks Jim. Did a quick perusal of the manual. Nice.

    The Sheline manual has a majority of the codes in their manual. The software used in this machine is called GRBL (Candel) I've got up and running on the computer hooked to the machine through a USB port. I need to play with it some more to figure it all out. right now I'm trying to figure out where and how "home" position is set. I think I may have it. Saw a short video last night of just that operation. Need more practice on this machine to figure it out. Not as easy as it was on the Sherline software.

    I have to say it is quite a neat little machine. From all the videos I've seen on these types of machines shows me that the presenters have no idea about rigidity of machines. They all want to install an 800-watt (1.0hp) motor on this little machine. I think once I get it running it'll do what I want without a problem. These machines are engraving machines first and not bridge mills.

    Bernd

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  • BurleyJim
    replied
    Bernd, Here is an excellent guide you might want to use as a reference. Chapter 7 gets into G Codes in understandable terms.

    https://www.haascnc.com/content/dam/...ual---2017.pdf

    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • Bernd
    replied
    Originally posted by Dutchman View Post
    Nothing like a new toy to pass the time in the dead of winter. Neat tool. Look forward to seeing what you do with it, Bernd.
    Ya, but my kitchen cupboard project is lacking. I glad the wife hasn't yelled ay me yet for playing all this weekend. As soon I get better control of the machine I'll be trying out some interesting stuff.

    Bernd

    Leave a comment:


  • Bernd
    replied
    Originally posted by BurleyJim View Post
    Send it a G28, that should set axes to the home position. Wherever you set mechanical home (XO,YO,ZO) although ZO might not be set automatically, it should always return there with a G28.
    You're having way too much fun!

    Jim
    Thanks Jim. The software this machine uses i called GRBL. It's close to what the Sherline uses.as far as commands go. I got it to run pretty good. I also need to do a bit more studying of the G -coes and understand them as applied to this machine. I'll give that G28 a try.

    Bernd

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  • Dutchman
    replied
    Nothing like a new toy to pass the time in the dead of winter. Neat tool. Look forward to seeing what you do with it, Bernd.

    Leave a comment:


  • BurleyJim
    replied
    Send it a G28, that should set axes to the home position. Wherever you set mechanical home (XO,YO,ZO) although ZO might not be set automatically, it should always return there with a G28.
    You're having way too much fun!

    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • Bernd
    replied
    That last post with the delete was to try out something.

    Okay Jim. I looked up the G54 code. In the Sherline manual it says "use preset work coordinate system 2". I also have a G20 = inch system selection and a G21 = millimeter selection system. Going have to study this. Thanks for input.

    So I decided to hook the computer to the machine. I got everything working. Loaded their test cutting file. Machine did its thing. Next up was to see if the file from the window frame would load and run. But before I did that I had asked if the machine would work with inches and how do I set it up. This was on the FB group. One guy came back with a very uninformative answer, "Change it in the software". Great which software the machine or at the beginning of the process such as in the CAM or CAD. I didn't go back and ask. So after I had the machine hooked up, installed the software I started clicking on icons to see what would happen. Came upon a button called "Service" clicked on that and scrolled down the assorted settings and came across a setting called "Machine Information". Low and behold a "Units" button and it can be set to either millimeters or inches. So you guessed it. I clicked on inches. Back out at the control page it still showed millimeters. Well I loaded the window file and it ran just fine. I noticed that the read out was reading in millimeters though. So the thought is the machine software does the math and runs the machine in millimeters. So it looks like I can do the CAD and CAM work in inches and the machine will do the conversion. Very happy about that. Of course, now the question is, will the Sherline do the same since I'll be installing 10mm ball screws one of these days. I guess I'll find out.

    Next is learning how the machine is set up to a home position as I'm still unfamiliar with their vernacular (Chinese translation to English basically what's their translation mean).

    So far I've been a happy camper with this machine. Although frustrating at times figuring out what and how of this machine it been a fun learning experience. Anybody that isn't comfortable working with getting a computer to control a CNC machine, such as a beginner is going to have a hard time. So if any of you decide to go with one of these machines I can answer a majority of the questions you might have.

    Once I feel comfortable enough to try and cut something I'll give and update. So far so good. A bit frustrating at times but great fun when you get a positive result.

    Bernd

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  • BurleyJim
    commented on 's reply
    G54,

  • Bernd
    replied
    Originally posted by Carl_B View Post
    Looking on with great interest Bernd.
    Welcome aboard Carl. I think I still own one resistance soldering rig build. Keep popping in. You'll never know what I got going.

    Bernd

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