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Two Stall Engine House by E. Suydam & Co.

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  • Two Stall Engine House by E. Suydam & Co.

    Surprise. I have been doing some modeling. I needed a distraction from the 1:1 project's, the basement redo, and the stalled rock-crusher project. I figured this will keep my enthusiasm up and I'll get things do faster. So far so good. Also, I like soldering. I got this kit at the Syracuse show this past early November. I have another new one stashed away in a drawer that I may build at a much later date. For this project I plan on putting it on a small diorama to photograph some of my engines.

    So, let's begin with a clean workbench and the the yellow box.

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    The obligatory picture of the parts.

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    Ok, that does it for the introductory part. Be back in a few with the start of this project.

    Bernd
    New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

  • #2
    Let’s begin. Following the instruction sheet, it calls for soldering angle pieces to the sides and ends of the wall, two at both ends and a long one on the bottom. On the sides it calls for a piece of angle 3 5/8" long. The kit only had 3 pieces, plus they were not the right length. They are 3 1/2". I could have used them but thought I'd try a bit of sheet metal work.

    I made angled pieces from .010" thick brass sheet. That's the same thickness as the metal provide in the kit. First, some experimentation. I wanted to see if I could make more appropriate angles. The angle pieces that come with the kit kind of has a rounded corner at the bend. I want more of a sharp corner.
    Here are some of the different methods I used to find what would work the best for cutting pieces of brass and not have it curl. Trying to straighten a curled one out can be a PITA and you can cut yourself if not careful.

    First though I needed a square corner on the brass sheet. I scratched a line and then cut it with a pair scissors I think there is a name for these.

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    This is the result using these scissors.

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    Next, I tried a pair metal cutting shears. The brass didn’t twist like in the first picture, but still curled.

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    Next, I tried a pair of Fiskars scissors with the same result as before.

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    Next, I tried what we usually do with styrene. We scribe and then bend to snap the piece off. Well is doesn’t quite snap off on brass, but bending it back and forth will break it at the scribed line. I used a sharpened dental pick to do the scribing.

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    It leaves nice little curly-cue chips.

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    Next I measured 1/8” from the edge and scribed a line.

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    Then measured over ¼” and this line I kept scribing until I was almost all the way through the brass.

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    Then I bent the piece over the sharp edge of the work surface.

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    Then I bent it back over itself until it broke along the scribe line.

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    Next, I placed the piece in a vise with sharp 90-degree jaws and lined up the scribed line.

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    Next, using a small hammer I started the 90-degree bend. Work your way along the piece and don’t try to bend it all at once.

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    Once bent all the way then you can hammer it down for a nice sharp angled corner.

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    Here you can see the nice bend. The piece was too long to do the whole strip at one time. I but it back in and finished bending it over.

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    Bend results in too short a vice and a too long piece. It’ll give you a slight bend. The remedy for that was to cut the piece to length before bending it.

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    Once the angles were formed it was time for some soldering. I used my DYI resistance soldering rig to do that. I first a good the areas that were going to be soldered a good scrubbing with a stainless-steel wire brush to get the oxide off.

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    I used rosin flux for a good bond with the solder.

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    I used a pair of 1-2-3 blocks to hold the angled piece square to the end of the building. I was able to hold it there with resistance soldering probe and in the other hand hold the solder. A quick step on the on/off pedal switch and it was tack soldered. I did that in a couple of spots and then went back and soldered the full length. Doing that helps to keep the angle piece in place.

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    Next came the longer pieces that needed to be soldered on the bottom. These are to be soldered on 3/32” from the bottom up. Again, a couple of spot solder joints and then back over the whole length.

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    The side walls are all done.

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    Next the end walls, the upper portion of the end walls and the doors will get soldered on. The same procedure is used as the side walls. I’ll get those already before posting again when I assemble everything.

    Until next time.

    Bernd
    New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

    Comment


    • #3
      Bernd,

      Your kit takes me back many decades. I did two of the metal Suydam kits back in the sixties. I wasn't much good at the soldering, even after I took metal shop in high school. I did manage to assemble the kits and they looked pretty good unless you looked at the blobs of solder on the inside.

      I've actually cut very thin brass with repeated passes of an Xacto. Needless to say, I only needed a few pieces or my supply of blades would not have lasted long. I found various ways to straighten out curled brass strips with mixed success.

      I imagine your engine house will look great when you are done. I'll enjoy watching you build.

      Mike

      _________________________________________________

      Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

      Comment


      • #4
        WOW. It seems you are off to a great start. Looking good. Great info on the brass pieces.

        And by the way, I'll be contacting "Dept G41" about a missing vice.

        Looking forward to more progress pictures.

        GULF COAST & WESTERN

        Comment


        • #5
          Michael,

          Thanks for the nice words. I thought I try posting something that uses a different medium than wood and plaster. Perhaps some of the newer/younger members might get inspired to try one of these old kits. Soldering is an acquired technique. I try to teach a guy in a club one time how to solder. He just didn't have the talent. he was good in other aspects. but not soldering. I'm contemplating some additional work to the engine house that aren't kit related, like the windows. After seeing how CarlB did his on the Polar Express, I'm looking at how to do better windows on the engine house. Also looking adding interior wall studding if possible.

          Bernd
          New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by john_holt View Post
            WOW. It seems you are off to a great start. Looking good. Great info on the brass pieces.

            And by the way, I'll be contacting "Dept G41" about a missing vice.

            Looking forward to more progress pictures.
            Thanks John. Much appreciate the kind words.

            Good luck contacting Dept. G41. No such department. Take a closer look at that "G". what else looks like a G (6). I can't even remember where it came from.

            Bernd
            New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

            Comment


            • #7
              I've never built one of these metal types, following along with curiosity.

              Did Suydam provide a finished pic?
              Carl

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              • #8
                Bernd, that old "Suydam" kit looks like a blast from the past. Looks like your off to a good start. Best of luck with it!

                Greg

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                • #9
                  Bernd, I was going to quip 'You nailed it!' but obviously You Soldered It!!
                  Nice start. I saw a modeler who seemed to have good success cutting thn soft metal on a paper shear.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Carl_B View Post
                    I've never built one of these metal types, following along with curiosity.

                    Did Suydam provide a finished pic?
                    Carl,

                    Thanks for following along. No, they didn't. Not in this one. I'm not sure if everything was in the box as far as pictures or other paper work. The parts all seemed to be there except for on angle piece. I'll have to check my other kit I got from a then open hobby shop.

                    Bernd
                    New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by greg_s View Post
                      Bernd, that old "Suydam" kit looks like a blast from the past. Looks like your off to a good start. Best of luck with it!

                      Greg
                      Thanks Greg. Way back when I was still living at home my Dad had bought me their Saw Mill kit. I don't think I ever finished it. I've always like to solder and the resistance solder rig works great on this kit.

                      Bernd
                      New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bill_Gill View Post
                        Bernd, I was going to quip 'You nailed it!' but obviously You Soldered It!!
                        Nice start. I saw a modeler who seemed to have good success cutting thn soft metal on a paper shear.
                        Thanks Bill. Well, you could nail it if you had a nail gun. I don't think I ever seen any HO scale nail guns though. I'll have to build one. I've got a paper shear for just that purpose but was never satisfied with the results. the pieces did curl and sometimes the shear wouldn't cut right. A metal cutting shear would work better, but I have enough tolls already.

                        Bernd
                        New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well, I thought I'd close tonight out with the front and back walls assembled. Not to be.As I was putting the pieces of the front wall together, the wall with the doors in it, I discovered that the width of the doors and outer most wall piece left a gap. Note that the left side would show the doors closed. Each side is made up of three pieces. The two doors and the outer side wall.

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                          A quick read of the instructions again stated that 3/32" wide strips were to be soldered to the edges of the door. So that makes up the 1/2" that is missing on the left door set.

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                          When I started the project, I was thinking of making a set of wooden doors. I've never seen swinging corrugated doors. I guess I'll sleep on it, not the doors, but what to do about the doors.

                          See you guys in the morning for breakfast.

                          Bernd
                          New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

                          Comment


                          • BurleyJim
                            BurleyJim commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Build a set of sliders like on barn doors. The trick will be to make then operate independently only one door open at a time.

                            I had to smile when you started out with a 'clean workbench'. Cleaner than mine!

                        • #14
                          Hi Bernd. It's looking good.

                          If you decide to do interior framing, you might look at the Sierra Railroad machine shop in Jamestown, CA, which is a corrugated metal structure with wood frame. There are photos on line. Also, I have a book that has drawings that show the framing.

                          Or you can just make something up.

                          Mike
                          _________________________________________________

                          Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            I built a couple Sydam tin kits a few years ago and enjoyed the change of pace and perked up my soldering skills by the time I finished. It was fun. Good start ya got going. Bernd.
                            Karl Scribner-Curmudgeon

                            Cedar Swamp
                            SW of Manistique, MI

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