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Looking into making a corrugating tool for HO

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  • Looking into making a corrugating tool for HO

    For a while now I've been thinking of building a corrugating roller. This idea came about over several years ago when a modeler posted a design in another forum. I exchanged e-mails with him on building one but never pursued the issue any further until recently when I started building the rock-crusher building. After having put together the top of the building made from board-n-batten siding I was quite unsatisfied with what it looked like. I think corrugated siding would look a lot better.

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    Ya I know I could go out and buy the product, but what fun would that be? So I've been tossing around how I could make one using my CNC mill with indexing head. It would be easy to do with the mill. Now I'm not quite sure how HO corrugated siding should look like. I have several samples from Campbell's, some real heavy stuff from the old Syudam kits and some from another unknown manufacturer. It's kind of hard to come up with what is needed.

    Louis to the recue. He posted a picture of something I think I can work with.

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    Here' the thing though. I want to motorize it so you can take sized precut strips and just drop them in. The thing is they have to go in square to the rollers. So some form of guidance will be needed. So this gives me something to think about while working on the basement redo painting the walls as soon as I get them all up. Lets see what I can come up with. I guess I'm going to have to get my Fusion 3D design foo working.

    Looking at the picture I'm wondering if driving only one roller would work or if both rollers would need to be driven with some outside gearing.

    Bernd
    New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

  • #2
    I was just looking at a ribbed toothpaste roller on line just the other day. It uses the simple Armstrong method. No need to overcomplicate a simple process just because it's possible to overcomplicate it with imagineering.

    Look up "toothpaste tube squeezer"

    Just a humble man's opinion.

    ( Obviously not mine, because I'm not particularly humble )
    Last edited by David_J_Buchholz; 6 days ago.

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    • #3
      Bernd, thanks for the plug for the idea. While we are discussing this tool, I believe that only one roller would need to be motorized, where they work like gears, and would turn each other, you would only have to turn one by motor like if you turned it by hand with the wingnut.

      David, I'm sold on that idea. I'm going to look into it and see if the corrugations are close to HO scale. I don't need no motor for how many I'd need at a time. Thanks for sharing this.

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      Last edited by desertdrover; 6 days ago.


      Louis
      Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

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      • #4
        Yup that's the tool. Wouldn't surprise me if there are variation in the rib spacing. The one I have at home is very course. Might work for O gauge, which unfortunately, I don't work in. Need one with finer spacing than what I have for HO work.

        Wonder if drawing between two hair combs would work. The problem is at our age, many of us don't have need for combs any more.
        Last edited by David_J_Buchholz; 6 days ago.

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        • #5
          I think that something similar to the tooth paste squeezer would work manually. My question is how many of the sheets are going to go in a bit crooked. And speaking of sheets, about what size is standard. I'm going have to do a bit of investigation as to the sizes. I know they come in a least 16 foot lengths. My Dad and I installed some on his workshop and garage. I think they were close to 3 feet wide. I'm sure you can order any size you want.

          Time to do some contemplation on his subject.

          Bernd
          New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

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          • #6
            I saw an ad (in German) for someone who was making corrugated machines from 3D printed dies, etc.

            dave
            Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by deemery View Post
              I saw an ad (in German) for someone who was making corrugated machines from 3D printed dies, etc.

              dave
              My question would be how long will they last. Not that it's a bad idea. I would think the aluminum would wear out the resin quite fast. Then you still have to build a frame to hold the ies in or is the whole machine 3D printed?

              I've looked on U-tube to see how the 1:1 stuff is made. Pretty interesting.

              Bernd
              New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

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              • #8
                Here's a Downloadable file. Wondering if is scalable to get the distance between ribs that is desired. The center three pictures

                https://stlbase.com/browse/toothpaste+tube+squeezer/2/

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                • #9
                  I've always just used a sheet of corrugated Evergreen and a stiff brush , Ive heard of some people using old ribbon cable as a form . I've also just used a foam slab and the back of an Xacto knife to make standing seam. Click image for larger version

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                  The roofing has a card stock base with 3M aluminum tape backed with regular old aluminum foil . The advantage of using the tape is that it was easy to cut strips to make the top cap flashing.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by deemery View Post
                    I saw an ad (in German) for someone who was making corrugated machines from 3D printed dies, etc.

                    dave
                    Dave. Can you track that down again, and post the site?

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                    • #11
                      The JTT line now produced by MRC includes 2-sided (embossed) corrugated styrene in 1.1 mm (.043) and 2.0 mm (.078) spacings. I've found it satisfactory for a couple of loading dock canopies on my layout. The styrene is .5 mm (.020) thick, so it won't look as good as foil edge-on.
                      James

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                      • #12
                        I would think that the desire to make “HO” scale correlated, actually corrugated (don’t ya love spell-check?) might present a problem as 1:87 1” or so ribs might just be a wee bit too small to be practical if rigidly sticking to,”scale”. One would have experiment with some to make a looks right standin. The Campbell or Sydam parts both impart the correct impression when I’ve used them.

                        Somewhere in my stash of future landfill contents I have a set of plastic corrugation “dies” that the owner of the old Railrod.com forum, Tom Fassett, was making at the time of his untimely passing 8-10 yrs ago. Flat square panels of styrene he’d machined somehow with a laser, I think, designed to press ridges into pieces of foil.

                        My nickel in the grass..
                        Last edited by k9wrangler; 5 days ago. Reason: Add add’l info…stuff come that comes to mind 2/10 sec after you hit post
                        Karl Scribner-Curmudgeon

                        Cedar Swamp
                        SW of Manistique, MI

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                        • #13
                          My 2 cents.... the machine that looks like a wringer washer machine would lay the panels out horizontally (not too slick for drainage) unless the width would equal the 8. 10. 12. or 16' sheets. Putting 16 X 3.5 mm chunks of aluminum foil through that wringer might be a little dicey.

                          So, I started tossing this around in my head last night. The 2 rollers have an 1/8" hole through the center. One roller on an idler, the other roller would be driven. A simple spring between the 1/8" dowels (not shown) would snuggle them together. The rollers would produce a 36" wide standard width sheet as long as the aluminum foil strip. Whattathink?

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                          The 2 rollers interlock with the roller 2 (bottom 2 views) being the driven roller and cutting edge to maintain the 36" width. Drawn with Fusion 360, .stl file upon request.


                          Jim
                          Attached Files
                          Take the red pill

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                          • #14
                            Jim, nice design. That's actually what I was thinking also. I'd make them out of steel though. Precut aluminum to the size needed and run through the rollers. This is where I think the rollers will need gearing to turn both the rollers and a motor drive. My big thing is making them fast without any manual labor involved. My big question is in making the tooling to cut the grooves in the wheel.

                            I saw a video last night of a guy suggesting some plastic that is used in front of signs. Here's the link to the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U_3M28rhwig

                            He talked about lines per inch. He mentioned one with 20 lines per inch. That's .050 or 4.355" in HO scale. I think that is doable. A close inspection of the Sydum material shows that it is 6" scale inches in HO from one peak to the next. So, I think .050" from peak to peak would work. (double check my math)

                            Great suggestions from everybody. Keep it going till we get some tooling made both for manual and motor driven.

                            Bernd
                            New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

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                            • #15
                              I used .75 mm between the lobes. That scales out to the 14 actual ribs on a 36" sheet as measured on my barn. . If your using aluminum for the rollers, a carbide ballhead mill chucked into the toolholder on your lathe would probably do the trick. Just need to find a very small ballhead mill and be as careful as a brain surgeon. I think the tension springs would give you a lot less headaches in the building process, long run.

                              Jim
                              Last edited by BurleyJim; 5 days ago.
                              Take the red pill

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