Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

W&N Branch

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Dave,

    Thanks for the boxcar detail lesson! There is always something to learn here.

    Scott

    Comment


    • #32
      After many years, the Beech St. Engine house has resumed work on camelback engine, P&R 730. An MDC 2-8-0 chassis was equipped with a sound decoder and work resumed on detailing the boiler.

      Here is a rear view of the fireman's shelter. It was kitbashed from a piece of Athearn U-Boat shell.

      Click image for larger version

Name:	CamelRear.jpg
Views:	194
Size:	71.8 KB
ID:	982420

      Here is a side view, the boiler is sitting on a "shop chassis" and has a "shop tender", just to test fit it to see what it will look like. Next step is adding the light in the headlamp, adding class lights and then fitting the boiler to and tender shell to the sound equipped engine.

      Click image for larger version

Name:	Camel.jpg
Views:	192
Size:	86.7 KB
ID:	982421
      Dave Husman
      Modeling the P&R and W&N in 1903
      Iron men and wooden cars.
      Visit my website: www.wnbranch.com

      Comment


      • CNE1899
        CNE1899 commented
        Editing a comment
        Dave,
        Camel backs are my favorite locomotive! Nice job on this one so far! I need to finish the one I am building Z scale.

        Scott

    • #33
      Dave, very sharp work. She is shaping up nicely. Press on, finish her, she will be a jewel.

      Bob
      It's only make-believe

      Comment


      • #34
        Dave,

        That looks like it's going to be a great model, I've always had a soft spot for camel backs. But s'plain it to me like I was a 4 year old, why would someone build a steam locomotive in that configuration? What advantage did the camel back have over a "conventional" type locomotive?

        Scott
        There's a prototype for everything.

        If you can't make it perfect, make it adjustable.

        DCC is not plug and play.

        Comment


        • WNBranch
          WNBranch commented
          Editing a comment
          Originally the Wooten firebox design had the cab on top of the firebox, which made it very high. By moving the cab to the running boards, the engine was lower and could have a larger firebox without increasing the height of the engine. That was the original purpose, however its limitations became evident, plus boiler sizes increased to the point that there wasn't as much room on the running boards for the cab and after a couple decades they were obsolete and the railroads stopped building them, building end cab engines.

      • #35
        Scott,
        I hope Dave does not mind, but this is from Edward J. Ozog's site.
        He says,
        "A conventional steam locomotive has a cab for the engineer and fireman behind the firebox at the rear of the boiler. In 1877, John E. Wootten, Master Mechanic of the Reading Railroad began building locomotives with a wide firebox designed to successfully burn culm, small pieces of anthracite coal resulting from mining that were plentiful and inexpensive because culm had little commercial value. It was impractical at the time to mount the cab behind the very wide firebox so it was mounted astride the boiler before the firebox. A locomotive with this cab arrangement was called a Camelback, or sometimes a double-cab locomotive, center-cab locomotive or a Mother Hubbard. The center cab was inferior to an end cab because the engineer and fireman were separated and not able to easily communicate and the engineer was exposed to the possibility of a broken driving rod. Nevertheless, the ability to use cheap fuel was an overpowering advantage and Camelback locomotives were very popular in the anthracite mining regions and were even tried on roads as diverse as the Union Pacific and Maine Central. Camelbacks were generally smaller locomotives since by the time 2-8-2 or 4-6-2 locomotives became common, the dangers of the center cab had led the Interstate Commerce Commission to discourage construction after 1918. The last new Camelback was built by Baldwin for the Lehigh & New England in 1927. Some Camelbacks were rebuilt with a single cab but many Camelbacks operated until diesels replaced steam locomotives." Edward J. Ozog

        https://sites.google.com/site/camelb...comotives/home


        Scott
        Last edited by CNE1899; 01-26-2022, 04:59 PM.

        Comment


        • WNBranch
          WNBranch commented
          Editing a comment
          That's the "urban legend" version of the camelback origin story. Originally, Wooten firebox locomotives were all end cab engines. The cab sat on top of the firebox. The cab was moved to the running boards in order to lower the cab for tunnel clearances in Europe (the first camelback was actually built by a P&R engineer in France) so a Wooten firebox engine could demonstrate in France and Italy. The whole "the firebox was too wide to see around" was baloney because the P&R built both camelback and end cab version of similar engines, and while the last camebacks were built around WW1, Wooten firebox end cab engines were built to the end of steam on the P&R. The ICC never banned the construction of camelbacks, they held hearings but by the time the hearing were held, the railroads had stopped building camelbacks on their own.

      • #36
        That's beautiful work, Dave.
        _________________________________________________

        Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

        Comment


        • #37
          Details attached, primer on (oops, forgot the number plate):

          Click image for larger version

Name:	Camel4.jpg
Views:	158
Size:	168.9 KB
ID:	983018

          Click image for larger version

Name:	Camel3.jpg
Views:	169
Size:	136.5 KB
ID:	983017
          Dave Husman
          Modeling the P&R and W&N in 1903
          Iron men and wooden cars.
          Visit my website: www.wnbranch.com

          Comment


          • #38
            Very nice work Dave.

            I may have missed it, but what did you use for domes?

            Andre

            Comment


            • WNBranch
              WNBranch commented
              Editing a comment
              There were some Cal Scale castings I had, not sure which ones, they weren't in the packages any longer. I do need to figure it out so I can make another couple boilers.

          • #39
            Fantastic, Dave. I'm tempted to try such a conversion but I'm trying to maintain an earlier look.

            Mike
            _________________________________________________

            Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

            Comment


            • WNBranch
              WNBranch commented
              Editing a comment
              Camelbacks weren't built until after 1880 and pretty much stopped being built by 1915, so there is only a 30 year window for their construction (although some lasted into the 1950's in service).

          • #40
            Makes me wonder how miserable the real locomotives were to be on. Figuring your butt and toes would get mighty warm in those cabs. It would not have been the way I would have wanted to earn my paycheck!

            Home of the HOn3 North Coast Railroad, along the shores of Lake Ontario.

            Comment


            • WNBranch
              WNBranch commented
              Editing a comment
              Even on a regular engine they were out on the deck plate which could be wet and cold .

          • #41
            Mal Houck says the O&W called the rear end the "kitchen."

            dave
            Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

            Comment


            • #42
              Very nice work on that camelback, Dave.
              Bruce

              Comment


              • #43
                Dave, I am enjoying your work on this ugly duckling. Your modeling is great. The detailing is sharp and the primer coat is cleanly applied. I look forward to seeing this finished.

                Bob
                It's only make-believe

                Comment


                • #44
                  Dave the camelback is looking really good. Keep it away from that pretty C&O 7039 boxcar - you don't want it to be the straw that breaks the camelback

                  Comment


                  • WNBranch
                    WNBranch commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Buh dum dumm (rimshot).

                • #45
                  Thanks for the explanations on the design of the camel backs. Makes more sense now.

                  Scott
                  There's a prototype for everything.

                  If you can't make it perfect, make it adjustable.

                  DCC is not plug and play.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X