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  • #16
    The P&R gons are looking terrific, Dave.

    You're inspiring me to get back to building rolling stock. I have two more types of LV coal gons to build. We'll see.

    Mike
    _________________________________________________

    Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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    • #17
      Excellent Dave. The car is naked no more and looking fine.
      It's only make-believe

      Comment


      • #18
        Dave,

        The gondola looks even better painted and decaled! Nice job.

        Scott

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        • #19
          Very nice work on the Gondolas! Very crisp castings. I have tried resin casting but haven't much luck so 3D printing has filled the void for me.

          HÃ¥kan

          Comment


          • #20
            This weekend's project, lettering C&O 7039. Started out as a used MDC 36 ft car with an erroneous paint scheme and duplicate number. Stripped the lettering. changed the door from a right opening to a left opening one (very common in the 1880-1910 era) and removed the grab irons from the end (also very common to have grab irons on the sides or ends but not both. Repainted it a straw color with a boxcar brown roof and underframe. It's being lettered with a set of Art Griffen decals. A little color and some subtle variety to a sea of brown boxcars.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	C&O7039.jpg
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ID:	978853
            Dave Husman
            Modeling the P&R and W&N in 1903
            Iron men and wooden cars.
            Visit my website: www.wnbranch.com

            Comment


            • #21
              Very sharply done. It's a pleasant looking car. For what little it is worth, I agree with your observations on the use of left hand opening doors and grab irons.

              Bob
              It's only make-believe

              Comment


              • #22
                Excellent paint and decals, Dave.
                _________________________________________________

                Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

                Comment


                • #23
                  That looks great! What paint did you use for the yellow (straw)? I'm looking for something like that for my logging speeder project...

                  -Cody

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                  • #24
                    The straw was a 50-50 mix of reefer yellow and reefer white, unfortunately it was Polly Scale, but those are two pretty common colors.
                    Dave Husman
                    Modeling the P&R and W&N in 1903
                    Iron men and wooden cars.
                    Visit my website: www.wnbranch.com

                    Comment


                    • acousticco
                      acousticco commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Thank you, I have some yellow and white I can experiment with.

                      -Cody

                  • #25
                    Hi Dave, Welcome aboard!
                    Great decaling and link to you casting page. Great work!
                    Thanks for sharing!
                    Philip

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                    • #26
                      Good looking layout and cars. Glad you made it back here!

                      Comment


                      • #27
                        Dave,

                        Nice mods to the car! The color and decals look really good!

                        Scott

                        Comment


                        • #28
                          I really like that straw color! And thanks for explaining the grab irons. I had read a previous post of yours saying that the MDC cars had USRA era grab irons, but I didn't know what the difference was.
                          Ian

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                          • #29
                            Around 1910 the Federal laws changed and grab irons or ladders had to be on both the end and side and had to line up with each other and all four corners of the car had to have sill steps (stirrup steps). There were also changes to the dimensional data placement.

                            Prior to that, cars could have ladders/grabs only on the sides or ends and there would only be sill steps on the corner with the ladders (right end of the car) and the left end wouldn't necessarily have a sill step or grab iron. The grab iron on the roof would line up with the side or the end that had the ladder . For example , on the B&O car below, the ladder is on the end, the grab on the roof is lined up with the end. Sometimes if the ladder/grabs were on the side the grab on the roof would be at a 45 degree angle to make it handy for somebody on the brake platform and the side ladder. Gons could have vertical handholds instead of "ladder" grab irons.

                            For example, this 1897 B&O car has a left opening door, a ladder on the end, no ladder/grabs on the side and a sill step only on the ladder end.

                            Click image for larger version  Name:	x-B&O-1897-240383814_10224351082878042_8432064357866271933_n.jpg Views:	0 Size:	145.1 KB ID:	979491
                            Last edited by WNBranch; 01-06-2022, 12:05 PM.
                            Dave Husman
                            Modeling the P&R and W&N in 1903
                            Iron men and wooden cars.
                            Visit my website: www.wnbranch.com

                            Comment


                            • #30
                              A benefit of pre-1900 modeling is not having to model so many ladders and grabs.

                              Seriously, that's a beautiful photo of a late 19th Century boxcar.

                              Mike
                              _________________________________________________

                              Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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