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  • All-Nation Box Trailer

    Just for the sheer fun of it, and to get the kit out of the queue and built..........

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    Label is for the A-150 kit, but..........maybe not quite right......but that'll make it even more fun getting it sorted out and built anyway whatever's in the box!
    In a time like ours seemings and portents signify. Ours is a generation when dogs howl and the skin crawls on the skull with its beast's foreboding.

  • #2
    So, pulling out the starting bits......roof, floor and end blocks......wait....curved end blocks? Kit box has this as a flat end IT car.....Hmmmmm......

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    Not sure that these parts go with the box, clerestory / monitor roof as well to shape that's upside down in the photo, but I'm going to muddle on....got to cut the radius on each end and then shape the curvature of the ends....
    In a time like ours seemings and portents signify. Ours is a generation when dogs howl and the skin crawls on the skull with its beast's foreboding.

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    • #3
      M~,
      Hummm? Curved ends. This looks to be an interesting build?
      Thanx Thom...

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      • mwbpequod
        mwbpequod commented
        Editing a comment
        Traction freight cars frequently had curved ends both on the body and frame with radial couplers for getting around tight curves and street corners.

    • #4
      Sides are thick scribed surface plywood...

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      Instruction are a little sparse

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      In a time like ours seemings and portents signify. Ours is a generation when dogs howl and the skin crawls on the skull with its beast's foreboding.

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      • #5
        Not only are the Instruction a little sparse, they are for 3 different model of vehicles. Good luck with the build, and the decisive battle in the build process.


        Louis
        Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

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        • #6
          Originally posted by desertdrover View Post
          Not only are the Instruction a little sparse, they are for 3 different model of vehicles. Good luck with the build, and the decisive battle in the build process.
          Well, each of those other models that the instructions are for also have variants of inner and outer doors. I'm pretty convinced now that the milled floor is for a completely different model, . I've got at least 2 of the reefers and probably 1 of each door variant. Somewhere in the traction stack I've got the resin version of the reefer that Car Works produced - that's a very pretty car that was fully assembled and just needs the details applied to it.

          I'll just muddle through this one and build whatever the parts let me build, and not get worried about it. It's O scale; toss the instructions and build it the right way,
          In a time like ours seemings and portents signify. Ours is a generation when dogs howl and the skin crawls on the skull with its beast's foreboding.

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          • #7
            mwbpequod~,
            I did not know this fact about the curved ends. I (for some reason) was under the impression it was based on the future treadings (like planes, Iceboxes, cars, toasters, etc.) everything at the early to mid-late 1900s was ergonomically inspired for aerodynamics & modern inspirations. I knew about the tight curves with coupler pockets that had long swings but not as simple as for going around street corners that were curved? Now that I stop and ponder the thought, see what you're saying a little better now. Thanks for the tutelage. I just hadn't thought about it like that. I have a lot to learn when it comes to traction equipment.
            Thanx Thom...

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            • #8
              Originally posted by tct855 View Post
              I have a lot to learn when it comes to traction equipment.
              I've been writing the traction column for the magazine since 2009, and I'm learning all the time. One aspect of traction that I enjoy is the freight equipment; passenger cars and all are what most immediately think about when it comes to traction & trolleys. Freight and MOW stuff is where I find my fun!
              In a time like ours seemings and portents signify. Ours is a generation when dogs howl and the skin crawls on the skull with its beast's foreboding.

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              • #9
                Rounded ends were important on passenger trolleys, even those which didn't have multiple unit control. The only way to get a dead car back to the shop was to tow it with another, around whatever curves were en-route. Seashore doesn't have many freight motors; they weren't common in New England and the Northeast.
                James

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                • mwbpequod
                  mwbpequod commented
                  Editing a comment
                  But NE did have other rather interesting motors for moving coal and ash -- I've built 1 coal motor and have another to rebuild that was given to me that is a Maine prototype. If I ever get the time to spend really focused on a build, one of those ash motors is getting built!

              • #10
                Nice project! Never heard of this company.

                The auto industry should have required round bumpers.

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                • #11
                  Got the floor set and rounded it and the roof section to the end curvature. Now I have to shape the clerestory - these are fun as you have curves to account for in more than 1 direction. I use my 4" upright belt sander to remove the bulk of the unwanted wood and then it's the 4-in-hand, and then it's sanding blocks.... Have to sneak up on the finish line, not run to it. Then have to go back and add the curved overhang from the upper roof down to the end.

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                  In a time like ours seemings and portents signify. Ours is a generation when dogs howl and the skin crawls on the skull with its beast's foreboding.

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                  • #12
                    Got the roof pretty decently shaped and contoured......enough to move forward, at least,

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                    In a time like ours seemings and portents signify. Ours is a generation when dogs howl and the skin crawls on the skull with its beast's foreboding.

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                    • #13
                      Nicely done and an interesting car. I still have it in my mind to try one of these in HO scale.

                      Cheers, Cody

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                      • mwbpequod
                        mwbpequod commented
                        Editing a comment
                        LaBelle still sells some traction freight trailers.....I've built the CERA trailer - that car has I think 16 variations possible depending on end doors or not, and variations on side doors; the instructions that I got with mine included instructions for 2 other cars - deconvoluting that was "interesting"........

                    • #14
                      That's a really interesting model. You did a fine job contouring the roof.

                      This will be fun to watch.

                      Mike
                      _________________________________________________

                      Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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                      • #15
                        I get nervous shaping the ends of a roof. You can't afford to make a mistake. Yours looks good, Martin.

                        George
                        The sky is not my limit, it's my playground.

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