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  • dDaudio
    replied
    On ACC application:

    I use a dissecting needle from Perfect, with the tip blunted with a file. And a glass slide to stage the ACC.

    Apply a drop of ACC to the slide, pick up a little with the dissecting needle, and apply it to the model parts.

    If you use a good quality, fast and thin ACC ( like Vigor CE-480QO, 10-20 sec.) on well mating surfaces, the glue joint will be invisible.

    After a while the dried glue builds up on the slide, but can be popped off easily by sliding a #11 blade between the glass and glue for a new clean surface. I use the edge of a small piece of paper towel to soak up excess ACC.

    I have been using this method on plastic, brass, and soft metal combo models for years with excellent results.

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  • belg
    replied
    Louis, thanks, Pat

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  • desertdrover
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by belg


    Louis, can the dried glue be cleaned easily from the shot glass? Pat


    Pat yes, the ACC wipes off with a paper towel what I don't use. But even when it dries, it will scrape off with a finger nail. I find the glass to work out great.

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  • belg
    replied
    Thanks Dave it can't get much better than that for a reference, Pat

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  • deemery
    replied
    Martin Brechbiel is an industrial chemist (and a super O Gauge modeler...) I asked him about old ACC affecting new ACC:


    Chemist question for you on ACC: does this stuff act as a catalyst for itself or something? What I use a small baby food jar turned upside down, squirting some thin ACC on it, and then picking up the ACC from there. It seems to me that, as the ACC builds up, the thin stuff sets up faster.
    Make sense, or just my imagination? (Periodically, I clean the jar by letting it soak for a while in lacquer thinner, which softens the big glob of ACC that I peel off, and then start all over again :-)


    Yes! ACC is glues act in part by forming a polyacrylamide and I have noticed the same phenomenon. Probably just continuing the reaction onwards working off a surface that's optimal for doing just that.
    I was thinking about getting some sort of little "dimple" thing to hold a couple of drops of ACC so that I could dip my nbw castings before inserting them into holes............maybe just take a block of metal and drill out a dimple?


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  • belg
    replied
    Harry, I used to use the post it note method but the glue absorbed into the paper and I think you waste alot of glue this way. An interesting point Dave made "It turns out that ACC build-up on the bottom of the jar will cause new ACC to dry more rapidly.", I don't have any mileage on this one but can anyone shed some more light on this? Karl O, now has bought some of those little cups tattoo artists use and I think that sounds like a really good solution, there so cheap when your done just pitch it in the recycling bin for plastics. I think Harry you have a good idea with the milkjug, at least that won't absorb the glue like the paper. Pat

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  • hvig
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by belg


    Louis, can the dried glue be cleaned easily from the shot glass? Pat


    This doesn't really answer that question, but that's one thing I love about the post it note method of dispensing. I don't care if it's easy to clean, just rip the top sheet (or maybe two if they are glued together) and throw them away.
    I have also used old milk jug pieces cut into small squares. CA has real hard time sticking to that stuff... so it cleans easily. But I still like the pad better.

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  • compressor_man
    replied
    You can also put a puddle of acc glue on wax paper, it will sit there quite a while before drying up.

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  • belg
    replied
    Louis, can the dried glue be cleaned easily from the shot glass? Pat

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  • desertdrover
    replied
    OK Dave that's proof that great minds think alike.

    I made mine using old paint brush handles, and different size sewing needles. For the ACC I use a turned upside down shot glass to hold the ACC.

    For the price you pay for the ready made Applicator you can make all kinds this way.






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  • deemery
    replied
    I have 3 'critical tools' for applying ACC:

    1. The Applicator. This is basically a cut-off needle stuck into a dowel. A commercial version is available from Flex-i-file: http://www.flex-i-file.com/html/adhesives.html (about 1/2 down the page.)

    To make these yourself:

    Cut a dowel that fits comfortably into your hand, maybe 3/8" or 1/2" diameter, cut it maybe 6" long. Get an assortment of sewing needles. Drill a starter hole in the end of the dowel and insert the pin of the needle into the hole. Using either a cut-off wheel or cutting pliers, carefully trim off the end of the needle leaving a fork. It usually takes me 2-3 attempts to get one to cut right (what often happens is that the eye breaks and you don't get a nice even fork shape.) When you cut one successfully, add some ACC where the needle goes into the dowel. The net result looks something like this:



    Lightly sand along the length of the dowel to make a flat spot, so this won't accidentally roll away from you.

    2. The Glue Holder: Look for a really small jar. I use a jelly jar from a restaurant. Clean it and then fill it with BBs or sand (so it's heavy, and you can't bump it or knock it over.) Turn the jar over, drop some ACC into the bottom of the jar. Using your 'forkstick', pick up some ACC. Capillary action will draw the ACC into the fork. Move it to the model and capillary action will move the ACC to the model.

    Every night when you're done, take a piece of paper towel and wipe off the excess ACC. It turns out that ACC build-up on the bottom of the jar will cause new ACC to dry more rapidly. If you get ACC build-up on the jar, soak it in some lacquer thinner.

    3. The Applicator Cleaner: You'll also get ACC build-up on the forkstick. Item #3 is a Bic-style lighter. Just 'flick your Bic', and hold the forkstick at the top of the flame. The ACC will catch fire, and you'll see a blue flame. As soon as the ACC catches fire, remove the lighter (you do not want to heat the forkstick too much). Wipe off the charcoal/ash, and you now have a clean forkstick.

    None of these ideas are original to me, but together they work really well.

    dave

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  • deemery
    replied
    I've referred to such tools as 'persuaders', as in "Hand me that persuader, I need to persuade this part to fit."

    Note these are a much more high tech versions of a tool known in the military as the BFR. Example "Hand me that BFR so I can pound in this tent peg." (Big F___ Rock.)

    dave

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  • desertdrover
    replied
    Jon :up:

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  • LandNnut
    replied
    At my modeling skill level I use these a lot;



    Courtesy of Wikipedia

    especially when I am frusterpatetted uuuhh I mean frustrated. [:-censored] :crazy: [:-fight][:-grumpy][:-jump][:-nonono][:-shake][:-shake][:-sick][:-splat][:-timebm][:-timebm][:-weepn] :yuck: [:-scared][:-irked][:-hypnotized][!] :erm: :erm:

    I used to have a dial caliper that showed thousandths of an inch and metric but somebody stole it from the Auto Repair where I used to work.

    Jon

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  • deemery
    replied
    I use (covet :-) Altoids tins to hold parts like couplers, etc after I open the Kadee bag, and to hold castings when I start working on a project.

    dave

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