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  • Weathering

    Card kits if you look on my web site you will see i have built some mecalfe card kits of a brewerry dose thease kits get a weathering or no and if so how please.mike http://www.alvarostrains.co.uk/

    Always looking on the bright side of life

    http://www.alvarostrains.co.uk/

  • #2
    Mike, personally I like to weather all my structures, regardless of material. It gives them that "lived in" look that blends them with the rest of the layout.

    For card kits, obviously, using paints or washes could (but not always)cause warping. I would use pastel chalks or MRR weathering powders to avoid any problems. Also, I seem to recall a magazine article in which the author used colored pencils to weather card structures.

    Hope this helps.

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    • #3
      Mike, I'd do the same as Steve and use chalks or weathering powders unless the cardstock is heavy and heavily braced on the backside. And even then I'd be a little nervous about using any sort of stain or liquid weathering agent (such as black alcohol).

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      • #4
        Mike, I'm going to alter my reply a bit. I was just looking back through Wayne Wesolowski's book on scratchbuilding and came across some info that you might find very useful. He recommends that when working with cardstock (Strathmore, etc.) a paper towel (or some other absorbent padding) can be used to stain and weather card components. Basically, you dampen the paper towel with the stain and then rub the towel on the cardstock in the direction you wish the weathering to appear. The pigment or coloring will be transferred to the cardstock without a lot of the warp-causing moisture. The photos in his book of the procedure looked very convincing.

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        • #5
          Hi Mike.C and steve thankyou for taking time out to post that good info on how to weather my card kit buildingd very greatful to you both.mike

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          • #6
            Mike,

            See if you can find some Carr's weathering powders - they're great. Failing that, find some artists chalks of the right colours and a hammer. Wham, instant weathering powder

            Tony

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            • #7
              quote:


              Originally posted by MikeC


              Mike, I'm going to alter my reply a bit. I was just looking back through Wayne Wesolowski's book on scratchbuilding and came across some info that you might find very useful. He recommends that when working with cardstock (Strathmore, etc.) a paper towel (or some other absorbent padding) can be used to stain and weather card components. Basically, you dampen the paper towel with the stain and then rub the towel on the cardstock in the direction you wish the weathering to appear. The pigment or coloring will be transferred to the cardstock without a lot of the warp-causing moisture. The photos in his book of the procedure looked very convincing.



              Mike, that's a neat idea. I must get that book.

              I've tried mixing up A&I washes using the solvent alcohols we use for making our own shellacs - they're close to 100%. They don't cause warping, but they do evaporate really fast. And they can definitely re-dissolve acrylics - which is sometimes good, sometimes not good.[:-bigeyes2]

              Don Reed

              Pittsburgh

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