Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

changing "tires" on a 150 ton locomotive...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • changing "tires" on a 150 ton locomotive...

    As there are far too many posts in the UP topic, I decided to add an "interest" shot. This loco hit a truck at a crossing in Casa Grande, Arizona and skidded off the rails. The wheels were damaged and the loco could not be dragged back to Tucson for repairs until new "tires" were put on. This is how it is done in the middle of the desert when the nearest repair facility is a hundred miles away...

    http://tomfassett.railspot.com/photo...ion_motor1.JPG

    Tom

  • #2
    OK, I meant far too few posts... Maybe it was unintended sarcasm.

    Tom

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice picture. That is the old DRGW 3099. The cutout for the nose lights was the give away.

      Jim Harrawood

      Utah Rails
      Jim Harrawood

      Utah Rails

      Comment


      • #4
        Tom and Jim, thanks for the pic and the info.

        Keep on posting.

        Nelsonid=teal>

        P.S. Remember, be courteous to one another.

        id=teal>



        Comment


        • #5
          Imagine being the brave worker that had to climb under that to disconnect and reconnect everything. Great pic,not something one normally gets to see.

          Carl

          Comment


          • #6
            Great pic Tom!! Man, that must be one heck of a jack.



            Don in Orygun City

            Comment


            • #7
              Great picture Tom.



              Edited by - Jack Doran on 08/21/2002 11:59:38

              Edited by - Jack Doran on 08/21/2002 12:00:06

              Comment


              • #8
                The engine was lifted by a crane with a block and tackle connected to nothing but the front coupler. I was surprised at this and verified it by talking with one of the UP shop guys on the site. Considering the number of drawbar failures out there, I wouldn't trust only the couple. There was, indeed, one guy who crawled under the truck to disconnect everything. The engine was swaying slightly due to a light breeze and thus, making ominous creaking sounds. They first dropped the entire traction motor assembly and hauled it out using a pickup truck. Then, they mounted the new motor assembly on the rail and one guy pushed it under the truck, into place. He then pulled out a couple of large wrenches and proceeded to do this for both motors, often laying on his back directly beneath the motor housing with the entire engine swaying above him. I do not know what this guy gets paid, but I insist that it is not enough...

                When I get some time, I will scale down the series of shots I took and post them on one page so everyone can see the operation as it took place.

                PS: Thanks for the DRGW info--I never made the connection...

                Comment

                Working...
                X