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  • Paul_Rahman
    replied
    yeah, and more flammable when vaporized too!

    I know plastic prep on undec models are a big issue. Mold release agents have to be washed off, and there is a plastic prep to prepare the surface. Then, as Tanker said maybe priming.

    Paul in MI

    Member of Possum Lodge on snapping turtles: "they can sit there for hours, just moving slow if moving at all, but can strike at ANY time!"

    Red Green: "Sounds like auto workers!"

    Leave a comment:


  • tankertoad70
    replied
    Bucks and Debbie,

    Curing time for my new painting mixture 'technique' was two days. I painted the boxcars Thursday, and decaled the first one last night with no problems.

    I neglected to check what brand of lacquer thinner I am using , so will have to get back with ya on that one. I have experienced some paint chipping, as you mentioned, but have found that this seems to happen on those shells I do not take proper time and effort to prepare for painting. I do always use the Floquil brand primer. I find that stuff leaves a bit of a coarse finish which 'grabs' the paint sprayed over it.

    Paul is right when he talks of the noxious fumes from lacquer thinner. You will definitely want to ensure good ventilation and respitory protection.

    I shall keep ya updated with future results.

    Don in Oregon City• CEO: WISHRAM, OREGON & WESTERNid=blue>

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  • L_and_N_Debbie
    replied
    Hi Tankertoad70 and ya'll,

    My "experience" with Poly Scale paint and Testors thinner happened a long time ago. So, I don't even remember just how I mixed it. I had taken some airbrushing classes at a local Hobby Lobby and used the instructors paints, thinner, etc., already mixed. So, upon completion of my courses, I couldn't wait to use my "talent" and wanted to use what I already had on hand. It looked pretty good (I thought), until I noticed a difference in the color once it dried. Then about a month later, maybe more, I noticed the paint seemed to be chipping on its on. I figured it must have happened when traveling to shows, club, etc. But, it was the only one with this problem. I'm sure I did something wrong in the beginning, so now I use Poly Scale Thinner. I just wanted to know which thinner you used...I wanted to be able to confirm that my disaster was indeed the thinners fault...and not my own...afterall I had just "graduated" from Airbrush classes.

    Debbie


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  • Paul_Rahman
    replied
    That sounds cool, Tankertoad!!!

    Yes, mineral spirits are used to thin enamels, and Floquil and Dio Sol are more that type of paint. Laquer thinner is a bit more noxious, and used to thin/clean up laquers, more like auto paints used to use.

    Paul in MI

    Member of Possum Lodge on snapping turtles: "they can sit there for hours, just moving slow if moving at all, but can strike at ANY time!"

    Red Green: "Sounds like auto workers!"

    Leave a comment:


  • tankertoad70
    replied
    Debbie,

    I purchased the thinner from my local paint shoppe and am not certain what the brand is, other than it saying 'Lacquer Thinner' on the can. I am not at home this weekend, so's I can't tell ya. I believe Diosol is an oil based thinner, designed for use with Floquil paints. I had always used Diosol with Floquil because I thought a lacquer type thinner would ruin the paint job. A much more professional painter than I told me lacquer thinner may be used to thin any kind of paint being sprayed on. That is why I tried it with the acrylics. Another advantage I found with mixing this stuff with acrylics is cleanup becomes easier. Cleaning acrylic from the airbrush parts and color cup can be rather time consuming and difficult. Mixing the acrylic with lacquer has shortened and eased the cleanup process.

    Don in Oregon City• CEO: WISHRAM, OREGON & WESTERNid=blue>

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  • L_and_N_Debbie
    replied
    Hi Tankertoad,

    What kind of lacquer thinner did you use? Was it DioSol? I tried it with Testors and it changed the color...among other things.

    Debbie


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  • tankertoad70
    replied
    Mike, I cannot say for certain what the cure time is. No matter what the paint I use, I always allow one week during time, just to be safe, between paint coats or final coat to decaling.

    Good point too Paul. Too many guys try to shortcut the venting process, and a sealed motor is the only way to go.

    Don in Oregon City• CEO: WISHRAM, OREGON & WESTERNid=blue>

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  • Paul_Rahman
    replied
    quote:



    Well Paul mine didn't go up in flames, but then again, my spray booth has a sealed fan that sends the fumes about 20 feet from the house under the patio.


    Don, you were right it works great!! Thanks,

    Modeling the NYC railroad

    (Not Yet Completed Railroad)



    Phil


    id=quote>id=quote>
    That was my point. Some of the guys were taking liberties with not using sealed motors, due to using acrylics exclusively.

    FWIW-Model Railroader has a video out for those interested "Airbrushing with Acrylic Paints"

    Paul in MI

    Member of Possum Lodge on snapping turtles: "they can sit there for hours, just moving slow if moving at all, but can strike at ANY time!"

    Red Green: "Sounds like auto workers!"

    Leave a comment:


  • MikeC
    replied
    It sounds like it dries pretty quickly, but I'm wondering about curing time. Does it take the same amount of time for the paint to cure (i.e., 2-5 days) as it does for Floquil and other lacquers-based pigments? Or does it cure more quickly because of the acrylic pigments?

    I'm wondering because I usually spray a base coat of acrylic (typically Polly Earth) on finely detailed parts before painting them. Straight acrylics typically take 1-2 days for full cure. But if I can get even finer pigmentation and the same curing time......



    Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm a busy man. I have a railroad to run.



    http://homepage.mac.com/michael21/CMS-RR-Co./

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul_Rahman
    replied
    Paul and his fuzzies wait to see how many people with the "acrylic friendly" home made paint spray booth go up in flames this weekend. (when I poo poo'd the design, I was criticized, as "all modelers no use acrylics")


    BEWARE!!!

    Paul in MI

    Member of Possum Lodge on snapping turtles: "they can sit there for hours, just moving slow if moving at all, but can strike at ANY time!"

    Red Green: "Sounds like auto workers!"

    Leave a comment:


  • NYC
    replied
    Thanks Don, I hadn't tried lacquer thinner. I'll try it this weekend.

    Modeling the NYC railroad

    (Not Yet Completed Railroad)



    Phil

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  • rockislandmike
    replied
    Excellent info toad, thanks !!! My father-in-law gave me an old airbrush and compressor of his and touted lacquer to use as well, but I wasn't quite sure or comfortable about the ratio until your post.id='Georgia'>

    rockislandmike

    http://www.heatherandmichael.com/recklessandveiled/


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  • tankertoad70
    started a topic Painting w(slash) Acrylics

    Painting w(slash) Acrylics

    Learned something new again concerning painting. I thinned a batch of my Polly Scale acrylic paint with lacquer thinner to see if I could get better results airbrushing the stuff. Well, the results were astounding. My wife tells me that lacquer thinner will break down the paint pigment into very fine particles, which are easy to airbrush on. I had thought that using such a thinner with acrylic paint would be disastrous. The paint airbrushed on very nicely, and left a nice semi-gloss, ready to decal surface when dry. I used a mixture of 40% thinner and 60% color.

    Don in Oregon City• CEO: WISHRAM, OREGON & WESTERNid=blue>
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