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  • New scratchbuilt project finished

    Found a photo on the net the other week I liked it so much,I just had to have me one for my logging layout.






  • #2
    Beautiful model, but, what is it???

    Don in Oregon City• CEO: WISHRAM, OREGON & WESTERNid=blue>

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    • #3
      It looks like a Clyde double ended loader. A central boiler and car mounted donkey and loading boom at each end. Lots in the southern states and pine logging. I think McCloud Lumber (heads up Bucks) had one....yes pge 199.

      VERY nice Paul. With the couplers are you going to use it as a special load from workshop to the woods ??

      Russ

      Moss Lake Lumber Co.
      Russ

      Moss Lake Lumber Co.

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      • #4
        Hi Russ,

        Yes it's called a "Duplex" and is a double log loader, used for heel boom and high leads plus log dragging.

        It will just trail a shay or climax into the woods.

        Paul



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        • #5
          The manufacturer called them '4 line skidders'



          A duplex is a donkey with 2 sets of cylanders, one above the other. It is usually used as a loading engine.

          Russ

          Moss Lake Lumber Co.
          Russ

          Moss Lake Lumber Co.

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          • #6
            Thought I would post the original along with my model, the write-up below was from Wayne, who used to know about these beasts.



            These were used to pull logs through the forest by dragging, move rail cars, and lift logs into stacks; all on one end. The other end was usually used on the hi-line (or flying lift) as some called it. A cable was strung between two tall stout trees, and pulled tight, making the hi-line. A traveling dolly would roll along on this hi-line, moved by cables attached to stem donkey below. Another cable ran from the steam donkey up to a pulley on this dolly and then hung down to hook onto a log for lifting. Once lifted, the log could be flown across a valley hanging from the dolly riding along on the hi-line.

            There were several winches on these steam donkeys. There was a firemen that tended the boiler, and sometimes one or more carriers to haul wood. A winchman was required at each end to operate the respective winches.

            These were quite fastenating to watch in operation. There were two steam whistles on this kind. One low toned whistle was used to signal moves for ground work, while the high shrieking toned whistle signaled the hi-line operations. It was the only way to signal the men without confusion, and because the men were too far away to see hand signals.

            When time came to move this rig to another place, one of the cables was paid out and fastened around a large tree trunk toward the direction they wished to go. Then skidders would place wood slabs in front of the donkey's iron frame, and the donkey would real in the cable thus pulling its own weight along until it reached the destination.

            Sometimes, as your excellent model represents, the donkey wound pull its self into the air and a truck would be run under. They would let that end down onto the truck, lift the other end, set it on a truck, then haul the whole rig miles away. There would then be flat cars with huge drums of cable lashed securely to prevent rolling off. Then chains and all kinds of pry bars, wedges, jacks, and other hardware. the huge pulley blocks, the dolly and spare hooks, slings, nets, and long boxes of spikes would be loaded in a gondola.

            If the whole camp was moving, they would make a whole train out of it, depending upon the grade, and weight they had to move.

            I liked this type the best because all the guys on the whole train would wave at us as they went by, and we got to get up fairly close.

            There were some much larger than this that could not be transported on a rail car too. They had horizontal boilers and may have one or more steam donkeys side by side, all on one set of skid frames. These had to be dismanteled for moving and were usually around a sawmill or loading dock or some other more semi-permanent setting.



            Edited by - Pault on 05/27/2002 08:23:12

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            • #7
              Thanks for the update Paul. I spent many a happy day with my dad and grandad in the woods lookin' at timber. Their operation made extensive use of jammers to pull out the felled trees and load up the logs on the trucks. I was never acquainted with railroad logging ops when growing up in the 50s in Montana. The rail operation made use of 40' boxcars with two men in them loading lumber one stick at a time as the boards came outa the planing mill. I loved those days in the woods and at the mills. I reckon our last name was very appropriate.

              Don in Oregon City• CEO: WISHRAM, OREGON & WESTERNid=blue>

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              • #8
                Paul,

                Very interesting. The 'high line' your friend was referring to is called high-lead skidding. That is partially what the booms at each end of the car was for, also used to load the logs off the cold deck. If ordinary donkeys were used then they would need a 2-drum roader and a 3-drum loader. These donkeys would be mounted on 50'+ sleds. It's these types of machines your friend was referring to about dragging themselves along.

                The only thing I really don't agree with is that these machines were not removed from their trucks. A car mounted unit as you built and in the photo was kept on it's trucks and the frame blocked to stablize it.

                Russ

                Moss Lake Lumber Co.
                Russ

                Moss Lake Lumber Co.

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                • #9
                  Hi Russ,

                  Couldn't agree more with your statement regarding the trucks, I didn't see the need to remove and have the problem of getting them back on at a later date.

                  Paul



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                  • #10
                    Great as always Paul, never know what you will come up with next. You are obviously having fun.

                    Robin

                    Maberly and Tayside RR

                    Founding member of NARA
                    Robin

                    NARA founding member

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                    • #11
                      WOW!! Paul, you do wonderful work! It's not work though...when you're having fun! Glad you share with us!

                      Debbie


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