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How do I make a roof?

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  • How do I make a roof?

    I'm scratchbuilding a couple of wooden huts, sheds and other buildings at the moment using suitably trimmed and sized toothpicks as planks.

    The walls are easy enough, but I'm stuck on the roofs, how do I create realistic shingle, corrugated and flat tar roofs?

    Instructions or ideas for any other roof types I've missed 'cos it's late and I should be in bed would be appreciated!









    Building the first trans-Atlantic Railroad
    MikeB

    [image]http://www.mghorizon.101main.com/pics/trainlogo.gif[/image]

    Building the first trans-Atlantic Railroad

  • #2
    Hi Mike,

    I often use pinking shears and cut them out of paper onto a card roof.

    Here's a pic of it.





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    • #3
      Thanks for the replies, I went for the sandpaper/tar roof on my first attempt at scratchbuilding, it's not wonderful but from a couple of feet away it looks just fine.





      Next project - I need a couple of factories.

      OK, I may try a few more smaller buildings before trying that, now, I wonder what I can use for scale bricks.








      Building the first trans-Atlantic Railroad
      MikeB

      [image]http://www.mghorizon.101main.com/pics/trainlogo.gif[/image]

      Building the first trans-Atlantic Railroad

      Comment


      • #4
        Some great Idea's guys! Some I had used some not, but will in the future. Thanks

        Modeling the NYC railroad

        (Not Yet Completed Railroad)



        Phil

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        • #5
          Some more ideas (some are original; some are not)

          1. For corrugated roofing:

          A. Get Campbell's or Builders in Scale's corrugated roofing. Cut into 2' panels X 4, 8, or 12' lengths.

          B. Spray the panels with Floquil or Polly Foundation. After the panels are dry, follow up with light "hit 'n miss" dabs of Earth. After that has dried, dry brush the panels with dark rust (i.e., Rust mixed with Roof Brown or Box Car Red or Oxide Red.).

          C. After the paint has dried, flow alcohol down the corrugations. Before it dries dust the panels with rust-colored chalks (use 2 or 3 colors, including a dark brown). The more alcohol and chalk dust you use, the heavier the rusting will appear.

          (Alternatively, you can really "rust" this stuff up by dunking it in Archer's Etchant for a few seconds. But be careful! It's wicked stuff: dangerous fumes, and it can eat your corrugated panels - not to mention your skin! -before you even know what's happening! If you want a full description of how to use this stuff, let me know. I've worked out some methods that produce pretty good results in a fairly safe manner)

          2. For a simple panel roof: Lay a strip of 3/4 inch masking tape on a piece of glass. Cut the tape into scale 2' panels. Apply the panels to cardboard subroof (be sure to overlap them) and then attach to your structure. Paint flat gray or other suitable color. Use chalk dust to "weather" the seams, etc.

          3. Don't forget "board and batten" roofing. This was quite common before the advent of shingles and was frequently used in outlying (read: backwoods) areas.

          4. Tarpaper roofs were also quite common. Use black tissue paper cut in scale 2' X 8 or 12' lengths. Apply it over a cardboard subroof; be sure to overlap the seams. For a really worn appearance, build the subroof board by board. Then apply the tissue "tarpaper." The board seams will show through and make the roof appear really old and worn. For additonal weathering, lightly dust with medium gray chalk. (See the caboose photos on my website for an example of how this technique appears.)

          5. For flat roof buildings: Cut a piece of .020 styrene or cardboard to size. Paint flat black, Grimy Black, Oily Black, etc. (or cover with "tarpaper" strips. Then spread a thin layer of white glue over the entire surface. Before the glue dries, pour fine ballast (I use John's Granite) over the entire roof. It looks quite convincing! Be sure to pour some gloss medium or a few drops of Future floor polish here and there to represent standing puddles of water (quite common on flat roofs).

          6. For flat roof buildings: "Tarpaper" the subroof. Then use Floquil or Polly Oily Black to "seal" the seams.

          I have used all of these methods. All work quite well for me. I hope this helps.

          Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm a busy man. I have a railroad to run.



          http://homepage.mac.com/michael21/CMS-RR-Co./

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          • #6
            Also, spray thestructure with 'Dullcote' when it is finished. Next day mist denatured alchol on it to get a faded weathered look>

            Russ

            Moss Lake Lumber Co.
            Russ

            Moss Lake Lumber Co.

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