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  • mosslake
    replied
    Hi Edmund,

    There are no plans to replace the 48 class locos so they may run for a lot longer yet.


    quote:


    However it would be a pain to get off the engine and walk to the back (new front?) to go the other direction.


    id=quote>id=quote>
    It won't be any different to change from one loco to another on a MU lashup, and it's safer these days (we have our nut cases at level crossings too).

    Russ

    Moss Lake Lumber Co.

    Leave a comment:


  • Edmund
    replied
    Mosslake I find it very interesting. I am an accountant. I love numbers and history. Great information on Australian (Is that right?) locomotives. I like the fact that the 251 ALCo engines are still used. I was looking at more of the pictures on the roster for State Rail. I notice that many of the newer engines are a little square. I love the nickname "Flying Bricks". What struck me was the double cabs (Front and back cabs). I think that is a neat feature. I am sure that it is safer for going in the oppisite direction. However it would be a pain to get off the engine and walk to the back (new front?) to go the other direction.

    Leave a comment:


  • mosslake
    replied
    Not a problem mate,

    A.E.Goodwin was the original Alco licencee in Australia (like MLW was in Canada) and supplied the original orders. They eventually went out of business and Commonweath Engineering got the licence. ComEng as it was known then (it's now out of the railway business too)was a longtime steam loco builder here.

    Numbering....the 40s were left blank in the steam days for eventual steam loco use that never eventuated. Our steam passenger locos were numbered from 30 class (a 4-6-4 tank engine; some rebuilt into

    4-6-0s)to 38 class express locos (big 4-6-2s). Goods engines started with the 50 class to the 58s and 60 class Garrets(4-8-4 + 4-8-4).

    This left the 40 series blank so when the first batch of diesels were ordered, they were allocated 40 class, first loco as 4001 (We didan't start with 4000, although some classes e.g. 44 class had 44100, 48s had 48100)The 40 class were an MLW RSC-3 with modified cab.

    Interesting sidenote, a library book on Liberty Ships I read many years ago had a photo of a 40 class being unloaded in Sydney and still on the deck as cargo was the centre section of a 60 class garret so steam and diesels were entering service concurrently.

    As each class was ordered, they were progressively issued a 4xxx series number. This is simple until the 442 class arrived. As they were derived from the 44 class they got the '2'added. Why not a '1' you ask ? The 45 class was actually an economy version of the 44 but wasnt numbered so when it was delivered.

    Interesting sidenote #2-Freight Corp. was sold 3 months ago so is now entirely a private company but the last class of loco to enter service was the 90 class, built by GMD in Canada, so the first and last class of Govt. diesels were Canadian built (local EMD builder had 9 months of work with the 82 class so passed the order on to GMD)

    Reliability...My dad spent 43 years on steam and all diesels and electrics up to the 80 class (granpa was a driver on steam for 20 years).40s-didant like the manual transition (kept them from MUing with other classes)

    41s- burn the b@#$#$% - his quote not mine!!

    43s-more sump oil on the engine room floor than in the engine

    44s-good loco when properly maintained

    45s-ditto

    48s-worth their weight in gold,will work long and hard

    442s-good engine the last 5 were the best (they were an AC-DC setup)

    80s- too slow good on long freights

    Phew...

    Hope you find this interesting Ted,

    Russ

    Moss Lake Lumber Co.

    Leave a comment:


  • Edmund
    replied
    Mosslake another great site. I found very interesting. I noticed some of the locomotives were built by A E Goodwin and Comeng. Are these Australian locomotive building firms? If so, do you know how they got to using ALCo engines? Have you heard anything bad about the ALCo engines as far as reliability? Also could you explain the Class xx naming system if there is one? I hope my questions are clear and not a bother.

    Leave a comment:


  • mosslake
    replied
    Hi Ted and fellow Alco fans,



    The photo is of 48 class Alco branchline C-C loco. It is in the current scheme for New South Wales Government Railways (Freight Corp.) which owned 165 of these 1000 hp locos using a 251c diesel. It is the same type of loco in the "Off topic" forum post 'You know you're having a bad day when...'

    http://locopage.railpage.org.au/sra.html

    This link is to the roster page for State Rail as it's now known. Alcos are 40, 43, 44, 45, 442, 48/PL, 80 classes. All the rest are EMDs and electric locos.

    http://locopage.railpage.org.au/

    This link is to the entire page. Other operators run Alcos and other makes of diesels and can be interesting too.


    Russ

    Moss Lake Lumber Co.


    Edited by - mosslake on 05/18/2002 19:52:10

    Edited by - mosslake on 05/18/2002 19:53:26

    Leave a comment:


  • Edmund
    replied
    Nice shot Mosslake. Poor ALCo. If you wouldn't mind I would like to see the train or its type before the bath. A link or a picture whichever is easiest for you. Thanks.

    Ted

    Leave a comment:


  • mosslake
    replied
    Hey Edmund,

    There's not much of it to see as its on its side in flood waters but look for 'You know your having a bad day when...' If you are interested I can post a roster shot of that class or a link to same.

    Russ

    Moss Lake Lumber Co.

    Leave a comment:


  • Edmund
    replied
    Mosslake could you tell me where you posted that photo of the ALCo taking a bath. I tried the search and couldn't find it. Thanks.

    Edited by - Edmund on 05/17/2002 13:56:57

    Leave a comment:


  • tankertoad70
    replied
    Russ

    I shall have to dig around in my photo 'arkives'. I know I have a pix of that locomotive somewhere.

    Don in Oregon City• CEO: WISHRAM, OREGON & WESTERNid=blue>

    Leave a comment:


  • mosslake
    replied
    I've got a softcover picture book on Alco switchers S-1 to S-6 and the Portland Terminal locos feature in it. Do you remember what number it was ??

    Russ

    Moss Lake Lumber Co.

    Leave a comment:


  • tankertoad70
    replied
    Back in '75, I watched a Portland Terminal S2 switching freight cars near the station. I swear (figuratively) that puppy, er lokie sounded just like a canary.

    Don in Oregon City• CEO: WISHRAM, OREGON & WESTERNid=blue>

    Leave a comment:


  • mosslake
    replied
    Hi Nelson,

    Edmund kicked off the Alco theme, it struck a chord as we still have a lot of Alcos (251c diesels)on the road here-I posted that photo of one taking a bath in 'Off Topics' which I think you saw.

    Things are going fine....except I'm still waiting on a friend to finish the power to my shed so I can really get into my new layout!!



    BTW The new logo is neat

    Russ

    Moss Lake Lumber Co.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shay_Driver
    replied
    Hello Russ,

    Nice site.

    How are things in Australia?

    Nelson


    Leave a comment:


  • brakie
    replied
    I have always been fond of the RS-1.There is something about those RS-1s that makes them look bossy and some what cocky looking with that can do attitude look.

    brakie

    Leave a comment:


  • mosslake
    replied
    I like doing the same for my engines. It helps to tie things together if you have a model and some good reference material on the real thing.

    Russ

    Moss Lake Lumber Co.

    Leave a comment:

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