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Possible Hotbox?

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  • 20_unknown
    replied
    quote:


    I`ve seen hydraulic oil smoke when there is a break on heavy equipment,when it hit the brakes which are hot it`s smokin! Not sure if this can happen on trains,wish I could have smelled it. Hydro oil has it`s own smell. Jerry


    id=quote>id=quote>Nope - hydraulics aren't involved in train brakes. Air only.
    Which makes the TV movie "Atomic Train" even funnier, for the scene in which they foreshadow the brake failure by showing liquid leaking out of the trainline!

    Oh yes, and the detectors I quoted are in fact direct quotes. They report either way. When there's a defect on a CN detector, it only gives a "stop your train" and the dispatycher calls with details. CBNS detectors, OOTH, broadcast a full report.

    B-Dubya out -

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Modelling the Cape Breton & Central Nova Scotia Railway in HO

    Inside every GE is an Alco trying to get out...apparently, through the exhaust stack!

    Edited by - BentnoseWillie on 04/25/2002 06:51:47

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  • brakie
    replied
    erik,I made that up from listening to my scanner.I spend to much time railfaning and listening to the scanner.BTW,My second post was taken from my scanner as I typed it! Lucky for me those detectors did not go off at the same time.I am not a fast typer!!!

    brakie

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  • erik
    replied
    Brakie,

    did the Highland park detector acctually brocast that? I was just south, and just north of two DED's (not sure which one is highland Park) and didn't hear anything on my scanner. (by tha way, the DED's on the NEC just brocast when something is wrong)

    Difficult decisions at the vending machine - The Milky Way at selection F7 or the Pay Day at E8...

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  • horailfan
    replied
    I`ve seen hydraulic oil smoke when there is a break on heavy equipment,when it hit the brakes which are hot it`s smokin! Not sure if this can happen on trains,wish I could have smelled it. Hydro oil has it`s own smell. Jerry

    horailfan

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  • 20_unknown
    replied
    "C B N S Detector Sydney one zero no alarms detector out"

    B-Dubya out -

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Modelling the Cape Breton & Central Nova Scotia Railway in HO

    Inside every GE is an Alco trying to get out...apparently, through the exhaust stack!

    Edited by - BentnoseWillie on 04/25/2002 06:47:10

    Leave a comment:


  • brakie
    replied
    NS Hotbox detector mile post 69.9,total axle 444 no defects.

    Conrail hotbox detector ST,James OHIO,total axle 550,speed 50,no defects out!

    CSX equipment detector,Mile post 45.7 total axel 632 No defects! Have a safe trip!

    brakie

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  • 20_unknown
    replied
    A "Hotbox" is an overheated bearing - plain ("friction" or solid) bearings were susceptible to this if the oil wasn't checked and replenished regularly. Since plain bearings are long since banned from interchange, it isn't a big problem.

    Roller bearings can also overheat, but it is much rarer than a classic "hotbox". However, any overheated bearing is still a "hotbox". If it does happen with a roller bearing, it's very serious - it means the rollers have actually seized, and the bearing is in imminent danger of failure, which will probably mean a derailment. Bad stuff.

    A hot wheel is usually caused by sticking brakes, and is more common. On a train in the NEC, what you smelled was probably a stuck brake.

    I've also seen grass etc. get into the bearing area or the brakes, causing copious amounts of smoke.

    The "hotbox" detectors in use today watch for overheated bearings and wheels (and can distinguish between them) and dragging equipment. They talk! "CN detector Bedford four four no alarms five zero" - Bedford subdivision, mile 44, OK, 50 mph.

    B-Dubya out -

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Modelling the Cape Breton & Central Nova Scotia Railway in HO

    Inside every GE is an Alco trying to get out...apparently, through the exhaust stack!

    Leave a comment:


  • mosslake
    replied
    Brakes rubbing on the wheel can overheat the wheel then bearing eventually causing it to sieze then collapse, but roller bearings are relatively trouble free.

    Russ

    Moss Lake Lumber Co.

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  • Bucks_Owin
    replied
    Overheated brakes and/or bearing is what I've always thought......

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  • mosslake
    replied
    Not as common but hot boxes do occur. Usually when a roller bearing has seased. The results are more than audable than visual (noise rather than smoke). If the bearing overheats and collapses, the results are just as bad.

    Russ

    Moss Lake Lumber Co.

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  • billk
    replied
    I thought the traditional "hot box" had something to do with greasy rags (or lack thereof) or something like that, and is now a thing of the past. Can anyone confirm that, or am I confused as usual?

    Is your glass half empty or half full .. or just too big?

    Edited by - billk on 04/24/2002 00:57:47

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  • brakie
    replied
    STOP YOUR TRAIN:Frist hot box axle 12 south rail.STOP YOUR TRAIN:Frist hot box axle 12 south rail. Highland Park Detector out.

    Sounds to me like a dragging(stuck) brake.

    brakie

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  • NYC
    replied
    Erik,

    Sounds to me like your correct that it was a hotbox (not like I'm any expert), Brakie will know for sure what it was!

    Modeling the NYC railroad

    (Not Yet Completed Railroad)

    Phil

    Leave a comment:


  • erik
    started a topic Possible Hotbox?

    Possible Hotbox?

    Hey, today I was up by the NEC with my dad (i'm 13 years old) behind my house in Highland Park NJ. And around 5:30 PM today, there was a southbound train with an ALP-44 on the point. About two cars back, there was a car that was smokeing from by the wheel. Not normal brake smoke, as they usually do break before the bridge over the Raritan river into New Brunswick. It was rreally, really, REALLY, smokeing. Do you have any idea what could have happened? It seems like maybe something got stuck between the brake and wheel, or the brake got stuck on the wheel. It didn't stop at Edison, and presumably didn't stop at New Brunswick, probably just went to County. What do you guys think???
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