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  • Food for__thought

    Hi All,

    I have begun putting down roadbed and laying track on my On30 logging layout. I have run into a space problem which caused me to come up with an alternative plan. I have thought of building my sawmill against a wall and displaying only half. Open view to the inside. Does this make sense or is this a lousy idea?

    Also, if plausible what would you[^] suggest for the view? What machinery?

    Thanks in advance.

    Sam

  • #2
    Great idea! In fact I was inspired by a track plan by Iain Rice in a past issue of MR who showed the exact thing, a sawmill cut in two, at the edge of the layout. Don't recall the issue though. I made a machine shop as if it was sliced in two, and it sits on the edge of my HO scale modules:



    Here's a shot farther back that shows more:




    Hope this helps.

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice shop Bob! Sam I think your idea is a good one but not being into logging I'll have to let someone else suggest what machinery to use.

      Comment


      • #4
        Bob

        One nice build on the machine shop.

        Peter [:-kitty]

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:


          Originally posted by Tyson Rayles


          Nice shop Bob! Sam I think your idea is a good one but not being into logging I'll have to let someone else suggest what machinery to use.


          I didn't want to suggest the machine shop, just to show how I did a cutaway structure. My modules are of a logging theme, the machine shop repairs the equipment!

          If you could find the original article by Iain Rice, he did have a drawing of a cutaway sawmill.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Guys,

            Thanks for the replies and glad so far the idea makes sense. That is a beautiful machine shop Bob and the fact it is in half does not take away from the scene. I am going to do a search for the Ian Rice article and see if I can find it. I still would like suggestions for what to display.

            Thanks again,

            Sam

            Comment


            • #7
              That is just so cool Bob. A fantastic work of modeling (as usual)
              http://modelingin1-87.blogspot.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                Bob, didn't I see that machine shop of yours in a magazine a while back? It does look great. Out of curiosity, how high are the beams and joists above the floor?

                Sam, We model railroaders come up against space problems all the time. If you go to:

                http://www.btsrr.com/bts8300.htm

                you will see the suggested floor plan using Keystone HO machinery in a BTS Slatyfork sawmill. This might give you a starting point.

                Jim Vail has been doing a series of articles on his HO scale rendition of Tuolomne, sawmill site on the Westside Lumber Co., in "Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette". The March/April 2007 issue dealt with adapting or compressing prototype sawmill plans to fit his space. There are many excellent photos. He was not doing a "slice-through" to reveal the interior, but he discusses limited space planning using today's techniques and materials. Articles of his since the Jan./Feb. 2007 issue have dealt with various aspects of replicating Tuolomne. Great stuff!!!

                I hope you do come up with the solution that fits your needs and that you do share it with us. Good luck with your project.

                --Stu--
                --Stu--

                It\'s a great day whenever steam heads out into the timber!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks Stu for the link and advice. I will see if I can get copies of those articles.

                  Samid="blue">

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sam, a gent with a login by the name of Shamus, a moderator on the AMR Forum, built a ON30 logging layout that had a log mill cut lengthwise to show off all the equipment. It was a wonder to behold, expecially at night with all the lights on. He has a CDROM worth of photos of his layout for download from his website.

                    For machinery, you might also try Bret Gallant, Sierra West for logging machinery. He models some ON30 logging buildings and machinery/vehicles.

                    Regards,

                    Trent

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:


                      Originally posted by grlakeslogger


                      Bob, didn't I see that machine shop of yours in a magazine a while back? It does look great. Out of curiosity, how high are the beams and joists above the floor?


                      I think it was probably in my cover article in the October 1995 Model Railroading, which was on my modules.

                      Don't recollect the height of the beams, my modules are packed away in a closet. Probably 3-4 inches. You may be able to determine from the figures in the photos.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        quote:


                        Originally posted by railphotog


                        on my modules.

                        Don't recollect the height of the beams, my modules are packed away in a closet. Probably 3-4 inches. You may be able to determine from the figures in the photos.



                        Bob, thank you for your answer. Why didn't I think of that?!? Just by eye, it looks like 4 1/2 times the height of the figures. For men of average height, that would make it 26-27 feet.

                        The reason I ask is that I have in HO a couple of SS Ltd. kits for belt-drive systems and for belt-driven woodworking machinery. The set includes clutch levers to be installed near each machine and connecting to the line shaft. Your shop looks great, but I think I would have to lower the height of the line shaft if I want to use the clutch levers. The project I have planned (for well in the future) is a freelanced planing mill and millwork shop.

                        I expect Sam will be looking at similar considerations in designing his sawmill layout.

                        --Stu--
                        --Stu--

                        It\'s a great day whenever steam heads out into the timber!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Bob,

                          This is off the subject, but the lighting in your shop is so realistic. Do you recall how you did it? Wiring and how you hid it or made it look realistic, power source, the relectors, etc?

                          I am relatively new at the hobby and this would be most helpful.

                          Thanks,

                          Sam[:-cowboy]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I went to a whole lot of trouble to hide the wiring for the lights that are hanging down. The bottoms of the roof trusses were made from four pieces of stripwood so I could run the wires through them. Lights are 1.5v mini bulbs, powered by a small plug in transformer. The brass lampshades are from Campbell, and I soldered a piece of brass wire to each one, using it as one side of the power to the lamp. So there is only one wire going to each lamp.

                            After all of this work I was fairly disappointed - the little bulbs looked neat, but didn't provide much illumination inside the machine shop. So I resorted to an old standby - a bare grain of wheat bulb hidden behind one of the verticals in the trusses. You can see the lighting coming from it in my photos. Wiring for all lights was routed to the rear of the structure, and run down one corner, being hidden by some wood trim.

                            One of the mini bulbs is realistically not working. Never had the interest to try and repair it!

                            Had minor problems with the model not once, but twice - I dropped something on the roof and had to repair the trusses in place. Not a fun activity!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Bob,

                              That was a lot of work. Thanks for the feedback.


                              Sam

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