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  • belt-driven machine shop

    Lots of good photos here: https://industrialscenery.blogspot.c...revisited.html

    dave
    Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

  • #2
    More here!

    http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/b...s/65f81eb6.jpg

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    • #3
      Great photos, too bad 90% of people seeing these collections, couldn't identify what particular function the machine performed, and maybe 98%+ couldn't run the machine. We're one generation away from nobody knowing what the .... they're doing.

      Jim
      Take the red pill

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      • #4
        The closest I came was working in a machine shop in the late sixties and early seventies. It was all automatic screw machines (I think they were called) and I generally did second operation jobs. Extremely boring, although one day a machine decided it wanted to remove one of my fingers; that livened things up until it was fixed.

        The W A Young shop is just a few miles down river from where I live. I plan to visit once I find out when they have regular hours.

        Mike
        _________________________________________________

        Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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        • #5
          Jim,

          That sounds like a challenge?

          A majority are lathes for round machining. Next would be shapers = became small mills. Planers = became large flat bed mills. Obviously drill presses and grinders.

          The one of great interest is in picture #12. Using different dies one can bend straight steel bars into certain shapes. Think of bending a piece of straight metal into a stirrup step on railroad cars. I had the idea along time ago to build a table top model to bend HO scale stirrup steps and grab irons.

          The one that's a little scary is picture #18. I won't want to slip off the wheel and land face first into the grinding wheel. You'd get a very close shave.

          #25 = a radial drill press for large items.

          #27 = Cylindrical grinders for putting a fine finish and holding a perfect tolerance on a diameter.

          #28 = Brake press for bending large pieces of sheet metal for example.

          #33 = Looks like they could be die punch.

          #35 = A good example of a planer which in later years turned into a large bed mill using rotary tools for removing metal. To the right of that is a shaper used for cutting slots in metal. These became milling machine with round tools to remove metal.

          #39 = Early horizontal milling machines with an overhead arbor support.

          #44 = Horizontal brake press.

          #46 = I'm guessing this could be an early version of a gear cutting machine.

          #67 = Punch presses.

          #68 = The large machines are obviously punch presses. I think the hand operated are used to press one part into another, perhaps a screw type arbor press.

          #69 = Got me stumped.

          Did you notice the floors in some of those shops? Bricks for flooring. Can you imagine standing on those all day? Plus all the open machine gearing that you could get your close caught in. Yet they survived.

          Would love to walk through an old shop like that.

          Bernd

          New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

          Main thread to all that's happening on the NY,V & N Rwy. The New York, Vermont -and- Northern Rwy. - Railroad Line Forums (railroad-line.com)

          New York, Vermont -and- Northern Rwy HOn30 Quarry Line https://railroad-line.com/node/31167

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          • #6
            Nice job Bernd! You qualify as a 2%'er. But you are past 'next generation' status.

            Kindred Spirit Jim
            Take the red pill

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            • #7
              quote:


              Originally posted by BurleyJim


              Nice job Bernd! You qualify as a 2%'er. But you are past 'next generation' status.

              Kindred Spirit Jim


              Ya, I guess it doesn't count if you consider home shop machining as a second hobby. The company I worked for had belt powered machines way back when. They used the Genesee River to power there first plant. I've seen pictures of there line shaft powering gear cutting machines. I was kind of hoping to see at least one picture in that series.

              Bernd
              New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

              Main thread to all that's happening on the NY,V & N Rwy. The New York, Vermont -and- Northern Rwy. - Railroad Line Forums (railroad-line.com)

              New York, Vermont -and- Northern Rwy HOn30 Quarry Line https://railroad-line.com/node/31167

              Comment


              • #8
                Michael said re: machine shop “ Extremely boring....”

                Ain’t that the whole point of it?
                Karl Scribner-Curmudgeon

                Cedar Swamp
                SW of Manistique, MI

                Avatar image by Savannah Lyn Burgess 7-15-2022

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                • #9
                  Sometimes, it's "Grinding" or just "milling around".

                  Jim
                  Take the red pill

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                  • #10
                    It was definitely a grind, but there was little milling about. I knew the drill. I was generally given the low level second operation jobs, very repetitive and requiring me to stay with my machine. The worst was when I had to feed my machine a single part at a time. Somewhat better were jobs where a machinist made a little ramp for me to feed a handful of parts at a time. Every half hour or so I had to check that parts came out within specs.

                    Now I wish I’d asked more questions and learned more.

                    Mike
                    _________________________________________________

                    Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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