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  • Larry,

    I like the colors. I think I will try the coloring technique. Thanks to everyone else for ideas in scoring.

    Love this site!

    Scott

    Comment


    • Scott thank you. I'm very pleased with that technique. The hardest part is figuring what combination
      of colors to end up with the look you want. I've been making notes on the order of application which seems
      to help. Trial and error mostly. Good luck and have fun with it.
      Owner, General Manager, and all around "chief cook and bottle washer" of the Caz Coal-and-Wood Railroad

      Comment


      • When I purchased the Woodcutter's Shack it was intended to be built to fit the scene for which
        it was intended. That being said there are certain things that I will deviate from in regards to the
        instruction book and also not all the detail parts may be used in this scene.

        Click image for larger version

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        These walls are completed and waiting for the front wall to be built which is next to be done. After the initial coloring each
        board was cut and fitted longer than the side to be trimmed later. Extra graining was done one board at a time besides receiving
        a coat of A&I and the final chalk color which was then blended with a soft brush. The process is time consuming but well worth the
        effort. The back wall will be almost against the pine trees so I opted to leave out the two windows which will be used on another
        project. The right end wall was built with the window closed since the oil tank will be in front of the window. The left end wall
        was built with the window open since this will be visible in the scene. Nail holes were also added going up the studs as well as
        a few knots in the boards which were selected at random to enhance the color variation.

        The last wall to be built is the front. This will take some time with having to build a large window and double doors along with the
        hardware. Then it's onto the corner pieces which will be cut, colored, fitted, and installed which will help with the glueing of the
        walls together.

        That's about it for now. Until next time.



        Owner, General Manager, and all around "chief cook and bottle washer" of the Caz Coal-and-Wood Railroad

        Comment


        • Larry nice coloring!! A good choice for the windows be used.
          Jerry



          "And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

          Comment


          • Yah Hoo! Like eee!
            Philip

            Comment


            • Larry,

              I think you nailed the color! I hope you don't get board, with all the carpentry and what knot.

              Scott

              Comment


              • Larry, it looks real good.
                Good colors and neat construction.
                How'd you like using the new graining tool?
                Follow along as my dog and I travel the country in our van.
                FaceBook link: https://www.facebook.com/A-Dog-A-Van-and-A-View-108345371976229

                Comment


                • Larry, the structure looks terrific. The variety and blend of colors from stains and chalk will complement the design. Nice job. ~mike
                  O scale builds: Choctaw Lumber Kitchen, Dining Room, and Buffalo Canyon RR Caboose.

                  Comment


                  • Jerry thank you. I don't like wasting materials, since they won't be seen, so why not use the two windows
                    in the coal end of the build....just don't tell Brett.

                    Philip thanks so much.

                    Scott thanks and great play on words!!

                    Rick thanks. The graining tool I really like, I just have to keep my fingers out of the way...ouch.

                    Mike thank you, much appreciated. Learning what combo of chalks to use to give the desired
                    color was probably the hardest part; I am by no means any kind of artist.
                    Owner, General Manager, and all around "chief cook and bottle washer" of the Caz Coal-and-Wood Railroad

                    Comment


                    • Larry,

                      That's going to look right at home on your layout.

                      Sounds like you're using a lot of techniques to get that worn, weathered look.

                      Mike
                      _________________________________________________

                      Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

                      Comment


                      • Micheal thank you and that's what I'm hoping for; to blend right in
                        with the rest of the layout. Yes that's quite the process getting the
                        wood that way but well worth the effort.
                        Owner, General Manager, and all around "chief cook and bottle washer" of the Caz Coal-and-Wood Railroad

                        Comment


                        • Here's what I've been up to this past week:

                          Click image for larger version

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                          The Shack front has been built with nail holes added, a few knotholes, splits, and cracked wood. The door handles gave me fits.
                          The flat brass that Brett supplied in the kit didn't want to cooperate. Using tweezers the handles still came out to big; so I went to plan B.
                          Grabbed two staples and bent them into a "U" shape then drilled tiny holes in the door to mount them. The handles were painted flat
                          black and dusted with grey chalk then glued into place.

                          The window was made to be open with a stick added to prop it up. The "glass" was smeared with white glue and allowed to dry. Then
                          the glass was sprayed with cheap hairspray and dusted with a light colored chalk to dirty it up.

                          Added the detail parts to the wall before assembling the building. Used old license plates, horseshoes turned up to fill up with "luck"
                          and an old disused saw blade. The area to the left of the window will have a large cabinet in front and more detail parts will be
                          under the saw blade. There is an extra saw blade left over and I already have a plan for it.

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                          Here's another angle of the front. The doors had rusted hinges added and nail holes as well. While the front isn't perfect,
                          I'm very pleased with the results.

                          Next will be adding old signs to the left end wall as well as getting the corner pieces sorted out to actually assemble the
                          building and adding a black view block inside since the inside will remain as is.

                          That's where the Shack is for now with more to follow.
                          Owner, General Manager, and all around "chief cook and bottle washer" of the Caz Coal-and-Wood Railroad

                          Comment


                          • Larry, that looks really good.
                            I like how the window glass turned out with the smeared glue.
                            Not familiar with that technique.
                            Follow along as my dog and I travel the country in our van.
                            FaceBook link: https://www.facebook.com/A-Dog-A-Van-and-A-View-108345371976229

                            Comment


                            • Rick thank you. The glue is applied with a small brush and painted across. When dry it
                              "fogs" up the glass. The hairspray with the chalk added right after adds the dirty look.
                              Owner, General Manager, and all around "chief cook and bottle washer" of the Caz Coal-and-Wood Railroad

                              Comment


                              • Larry, wounds'y want to spend any time in the shack on a cold windy day, that building is way to drafty.

                                Really well done, you are doing the kit proud. Like rick, I never heard of using smiled flue for a frosty effect, I usually use dull coat. You have a realistic look there, can't wait to see what you do next.
                                Ron Newby

                                General Manager

                                Clearwater Valley Railway Co.

                                http://cvry.ca

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