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TOC Graphite mines and railroads

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  • CNE1899
    replied
    Marcus,

    If I recall, you are modeling in the 1904 time frame. Based on what information I have come across, I think barrels are your best bet.

    Some of these publications mention barrels/kegs.

    Scott




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  • jbvb
    replied
    I know grain sacks went from cloth to paper during or not long after WWII. I think that was also the timeframe of the main shift from wood boxes/crates/barrels to cardboard boxes and drums for dry materials.

    Leave a comment:


  • MarcusF
    replied
    Thanks Scott, some interesting stuff there!

    Now I've got another line to research - when did multi-layer paper bags start to supplant barrels?

    Leave a comment:


  • CNE1899
    replied
    Marcus,

    I found this on Google Books.

    Here are a few more links, some regarding Canada production.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=eq...6AEwAXoECAcQAQ

    https://books.google.com/books?id=3q...6AEwAnoECAgQAQ

    https://books.google.com/books?id=h8...6AEwBnoECAYQAQ

    https://books.google.com/books?id=p6...6AEwCHoECAAQAQ

    Scott

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  • MarcusF
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by CNE1899


    Marcus,

    Seems like you have some good information. I found this and thought it might be helpful, although it is from 1946.

    Scott


    That's awesome Scott! Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • CNE1899
    replied
    Marcus,

    Seems like you have some good information. I found this and thought it might be helpful, although it is from 1946.

    Scott



    Leave a comment:


  • railman28
    replied
    Mike and Marcus, thank you.

    Bob

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  • MarcusF
    replied
    quote:


    What are the "host" rocks?


    As Micheal mentioned, it's typically metamorphic rocks (I'm learning this as I go along, I'm no geologist or rockhound!), but for the area I'm modelling, the provincial government has a database of mineral finds, and the rock they're in. For example:

    http://www.geologyontario.mndm.gov.o...01SE00135.html

    Leave a comment:


  • MarcusF
    replied
    Thanks Wallace! I'd seen a history on Hague, but it didn't shipping to the refinery at Ticonderoga.

    quote:


    Originally posted by Empire of the Air


    Marcus,

    There is a short mention of graphite mining and shipping (with one photo) in New York in the Summer 1990 Society for Industrial Archaeology newsletter on page 10:

    https://www.sia-web.org/wordpress/wp...no2sum1990.pdf

    Regards,

    Wallace


    Leave a comment:


  • Empire_of_the_Air
    replied
    Marcus,

    There is a short mention of graphite mining and shipping (with one photo) in New York in the Summer 1990 Society for Industrial Archaeology newsletter on page 10:

    https://www.sia-web.org/wordpress/wp...no2sum1990.pdf

    Regards,

    Wallace

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael_Hohn
    replied
    Graphite is found in metamorphic rocks such as marble, schist and gneiss, or in hydrothermal veins.

    Mike

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  • railman28
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by MarcusF


    quote:


    Originally posted by deemery


    But I think graphite comes out of the ground pretty much 'good to go'.


    In North America, most of the graphite is in various ores, with varying grades of quality.

    What are the "host" rocks?

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • MarcusF
    replied
    Thanks Bernd, I hadn't seen that particular site, but others with similar information.

    It's interesting to me that the photographs from the era focus on the mining itself and the structures associated with it, but you don't typically see anything showing the end result. Maybe too boring or too active for the cameras of the day?

    Leave a comment:


  • MarcusF
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by deemery


    But I think graphite comes out of the ground pretty much 'good to go'.


    In North America, most of the graphite is in various ores, with varying grades of quality.


    The two reasons the graphite industry went bust in the '20s was that the lodes in Madagascar were almost as you describe, and the technology for refining the lower-grade NA ores didn't really emerge until the '40s.

    Some of the larger mills would receive ore from smaller mines (often just small open-pits) and process it. Some smaller mills would crush the ore but not be able to process the graphite, and so again would be shipped (likely in open cars). But the finished product produced by a full mill is ultimately a fine powder, which wouldn't lend itself to shipping in open cars.

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  • deemery
    replied
    But I think graphite comes out of the ground pretty much 'good to go'. Sacks or barrels makes sense to me.

    So that's boxcars in and boxcars out. But 'barrels in' would be a good excuse to run a large barrel car like those Knabb cars that Ye Olde Huff and Puff offered.

    dave

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