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TOC19 Operating Rules For Model RR's?

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  • #16
    All the rules books back in that era used international cities.
    Dave Husman



    Iron Men and wooden cars

    Visit my website : www.wnbranch.com

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    • #17
      As far as operating rules go, the American Railroad Association, the forerunner of the AAR, came out with a Standard Code of Train Rules in 1887.

      Before that there was mayhem. For example, some railroads used red for stop and green for proceed while others used green for stop and white for proceed and still others used red for stop and white for proceed. After 1887, there was controlled mayhem

      There were some interesting rules, such as if an opposing train on single track is late at a timetable scheduled meeting point, the waiting train would wait a certain number of minutes and then occupy the main and proceed, watching out for the late running opposing train, which should have slowed down when it was determined that it would not be arriving at the scheduled meeting point on time. In the real world, the late running train would often speed up, trying to arrive at the scheduled meeting point before that certain number of minutes had expired. Most of the time this worked, but if it didn't, then things got messy.

      Here is one of my favorites, from the Boston and Albany Rail Road, July 18, 1872:

      "The Saxonville train, No.13, and Worcester Accommodation, No. 73, outward, will have right of way against all inward trains.

      All inward regular passenger trains will have right of way against all outward trains except as above.

      Inward regular freights will have right of way against outward freights but not against outward passenger trains.

      Gravel and other Extra trains will use single track only under a red flag."

      This is just a part of one train order, No. 411, signed by A. Firth, Ass't Sup't.

      This was long before there were interlockings and wayside signals. The turnouts were controlled by switchmen, who had to figure out what was coming at them, a passenger or a freight or an extra, at all hours of the day and night and in all kinds of weather.

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      • #18
        I have uploaded the P&R 1888 rule book to my Operations-Rule Books page on my web site :

        https://wnbranch.com/home/operations/rule-books/
        Dave Husman



        Iron Men and wooden cars

        Visit my website : www.wnbranch.com

        Comment

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