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  • Ken Kidder Porter 2-6-0

    Hi All.

    I think there's some of you out there that have messed with the Ken Kidder Porter 2-6-0.

    What did you have to do to it to get it to run as nice as a good MDC "Old Timer" or Athearn/Gen steam engine?

    What regear/repower combo did you use?

    I would like to have one "one of these days"... but I would like to know what I would be up against first. May chicken-out!

    Here's a pic of the engine I'm asking about:



    Any input/experience with one of these Kidder engines would be much appreciated.

    Thanks.

    Andre

  • #2
    I have one of these, a guy who did remotoring declined to work on it. So I'll be interested to hear what others have to say.

    dave
    Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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    • #3
      Hi Dave:

      I've always liked the looks of them, but I suspect it would be expensive and time consuming to regear/repower one of these lil' doozies.

      If we knew the diameter of the axles, I would be able to look at options for gearing.

      I would be inclined to go with a reduction drive of some sort.

      Andre

      Comment


      • #4
        I've had one for over 40 years. The original box has a price tag of $28.50 on it. Good proof I've had it for a while. I remember buying it at a hobby shop here in Rochester, NY.

        Here's my opinion on it. It's quite a spartan engine. I think they did it that way back then so the modeler could add better looking brass casting details. I also remember a series in Model Railroader back in the 60's on sprucing this engine up. As far as running quality of the engine I have, I'd say I'm quite satisfied with it's running. It's quiet. Has a pretty good range of speed and of course it's a bit fast on the top end. Slow speed isn't bad but could be improved with a different motor and perhaps some gearing. I also have the 4-4-0 from Ken Kidder in HOn3. Same goes for that engine. I think both would benefit from a can motor. I've got plans for both in the future of putting the motor in the tender and adding extra wipers for more pick-up from the track.

        I say if you've got a line on one get it. If your not happy with it I'd be more than happy to take it off your hands.

        Bernd
        New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Bernd:

          Thanks for the input. The ones I've seen indicate they're not cheap anymore. It's that (and the additional expense of regearing and repowering) that have kept me waffling as to whether to obtain one for a future project. Frankly, at this point, my motive power $$ are best spent picking up RTR MDC 2-6-0's and 2-8-0's when they become available at a reasonable price. However, I would like the variety a Kidder Porter would bring to the roster.

          Decisions, decisions.

          Andre

          Comment


          • #6
            I have one of those, haven't messed with it yet. I was considering making it into an 0-6-0 switch engine. Its about the size of an 1870's - 1880's 0-6-0.
            Dave Husman



            Iron Men and wooden cars

            Visit my website : www.wnbranch.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Andre, I wouldn't pay more than $150 for one in good condition. But maybe prices have gone up on flea-bay since I was tracking them.

              dave
              Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

              Comment


              • #8
                Andree,

                I have one too. I've looked and explored remotoring (and redriving)it. It would be pretty east really. Plenty of room for a NWSL gearbox. If you don't mind the motor sticking out the cab a bit you can put quite a large motor into it. Otherwise the motor would have to be about 12mm diameter. Ditch the too small tender for one from Bachmann or AHM. Don Ball did a really super job in building models of the V&T's first two engines using a pair of these. Heather Clark use one to build a model of V&T #15. Fine models are very possible with these.

                Bob
                It's only make-believe

                Comment


                • #9
                  dave1905:

                  Yes, the model seems to represent the late 1870s/very early 1880s.

                  Dave:

                  The one I was watching sold for $179. (And it was missing a cross head guide.) That's a bit rich for my blood seeing as I'd have to sink no small amount into the mechanism (gears) and a motor, desired detail parts, and eventually DCC/Sound. It would easily end up being a $350+ engine IF I tackled the DCC/Sound work. If not, add another $100 to have DCC/Sound custom installed.

                  Bob:

                  Thanks for your input. Given the prices I now see they're going for, I really need to hold off and put my hobby $$ elsewhere. Darn.

                  Andre

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Years ago a firm called Roundbell that specialized in re-motoring brass locomotives sold a complete kit to re-power Kidder 2-6-0s and 4-4-0s. The kits were highly praised online by users. Roundbell still maintains a web presence--http://roundbell.com/hon3conversions.html , but no longer lists the kit as such. You might try contacting the owner for more up-to-date information. Even failing providing the kit, this site suggests which NWSL parts can be used for re-gearing that locomotive, and so may be worth visiting.

                    Frank

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      This is a model of a small engine named Benkei, one of eight similar export engines made by Porter for the the government-sponsored Horonai Railway in Hokkaido during the years from 1880 to 1889. The original still survives in a museum in Sopporo along with a set of American coaches. The Kidder model (sold by a number of other US importers as well) is actual oversize for HO; it was made disproportionately large--closer to S gauge--to facilitate more easily the mechanism and motor. The Kidder models were made for both HOn3 and HO. Despite its off-size, these models can be made to run very well after re-gearing and re-motoring.

                      Frank

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        quote:


                        Originally posted by OK Hogger


                        dave1905:

                        Yes, the model seems to represent the late 1870s/very early 1880s.

                        Dave:

                        The one I was watching sold for $179. (And it was missing a cross head guide.) That's a bit rich for my blood seeing as I'd have to sink no small amount into the mechanism (gears) and a motor, desired detail parts, and eventually DCC/Sound. It would easily end up being a $350+ engine IF I tackled the DCC/Sound work. If not, add another $100 to have DCC/Sound custom installed.

                        Bob:

                        Thanks for your input. Given the prices I now see they're going for, I really need to hold off and put my hobby $$ elsewhere. Darn.

                        Andre


                        If you want another wheel arrangement it's still the cheapest way to go.

                        Bob
                        It's only make-believe

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks much Frank for the input and those links. I've saved them for future reference.

                          Like this little Kidder Moguls as I do, I still need to be strong and spend my hobby $$ where they'll make a bigger impact for the same expenditure.

                          Andre

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Bob:

                            Do you mean a Mogul with different axle spacing? I have several MDC 2-6-0's... so I have several Mogul-type engines already.

                            But yes, part of it's appeal to me is the axle spacing, along with the fenders, and the step-boiler.

                            Andre

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              quote:


                              Originally posted by OK Hogger


                              Bob:

                              Do you mean a Mogul with different axle spacing? I have several MDC 2-6-0's... so I have several Mogul-type engines already.

                              But yes, part of it's appeal to me is the axle spacing, along with the fenders, and the step-boiler.

                              Andre


                              I meant for 70's. MDC Belong to the 90's at the earliest.

                              Bob
                              It's only make-believe

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