Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Winter Build Challenge:__Old Red Ball kits

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • BlairM
    replied


    I've recently come to appreciate the early wood and cardstock kits, they capture a nice nostalgia for me which being born in 1980 I never lived through. I enjoy imagining how excited a kid or adult modeler would have been in the 1940s to open such a simple kit and see the printed sides and couple details and know that hand lettering wouldn't be necessary and that trucks didn't need to be scratchbuilt. With those early "kits", any sort of truck was exciting, even crude ones. The only other detail parts might be a couple ladders and rough brake wheel which required a lot of filing to clean up.

    I have a couple cars which are just a woodblock with a milled roof and cardstock sides which I will run at Christmas as a nostalgic old time train.

    I just finished a Binkley East Broad Top Boxcar which had some more detail parts than the swift kits; it too was satisfying to build at a higher standard and involved some careful paint blending and overspraying to blend the original silk screened car sides. Matching the sides and ends is the most difficult part of these models, but is really helpful in boosting realism. I only updated the sliding boxcar door castings, but used the original kit trucks, car ends, ladders and brakewheel. All were cast in a soft lead alloy and required loads of careful filing to get them free of loads of flash; but my labors were rewarded with fairly realistic detail parts.



    Blair

    Leave a comment:


  • deemery
    replied
    Scott, I started on a couple other things. I did a cast resin small (1870s) hopper, I should write that one up. Then I scratchbuilt the 'switcher shed'. That project is moving along nicely. I like having a couple different projects going.

    dave

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael_Hohn
    replied
    Scott,

    I have a paper copy of the 1888 CBD.

    I’ve noticed that some of the digitized CBDs are hard to read. The 1904-5 ones are not too bad.

    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • CNE1899
    replied
    Dave,

    How are the other cars coming?

    Mike,

    Do you have the 1888 Car builders Dictionary? If so, it is in great condition. I down loaded the 1895 Car Builders Dictionary and it is not as clear.

    Scott

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael_Hohn
    replied
    The lettering appears to be from the 1888 Car-Builder’s Dictionary:



    Your car looks very nice.

    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • railman28
    replied
    Nice job there Dave. They came out a lot better than I thought they would.

    Good work indeed!

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • Larryc
    replied
    Dave very nice job on the boxcar. It would cost a lot of money to buy a car of that quality.

    Leave a comment:


  • deemery
    replied
    B&O car (almost) done....



    Still needs a bit of paint touch-up and weathering. The paint is Golden fluid red oxide, with a bit of brown oxide mixed in. (The sides have a little purple tint to them, but the paint I mixed should work fine once the car is weathered. The big difference in this picture is in finish, the sides are dead flat while the other parts are semi-gloss.

    The other car is a Westerfield PRR XG. The B&O car is surprisingly taller than the PRR car.

    dave

    Leave a comment:


  • CNE1899
    replied
    Dave,

    Very nice play by play. Bringing new life to old kits! Looking good.

    Leave a comment:


  • deemery
    replied
    Ends, top and bottom are primed (Vallejo German Red Brown primer, a good base for boxcar red.)



    The ends, needle beams, bolsters, doors, brake platform and brake wheel are "OEM" castings. I shaved off the cast-on end grabiron and substituted homemade grabs. Tichy brake cylinder and steps. Scribed styrene over the wood (and metal end) subroof.

    Finish paint tomorrow over the primer, then final assembly.

    dave

    Leave a comment:


  • deemery
    replied
    Truss rods strung, weights added, subroof reglued. Styrene roof (scribed siding) added, along with roofwalk supports. Brake platform casting added (can't see it), doors cleaned, test-fit with 2x8 trim, and of course the side as part of the test fit. This is starting to shape up nicely.



    Next step, prime and paint everything but the sides.

    Turns out Golden Fluid Red Oxide (artist acrylic) paint is a very close match for the car siding.

    dave

    Leave a comment:


  • BurleyJim
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by BurleyJim


    Dave,

    Put those cars 'darker side up in a sunlit area. they'll fade up to the lighter shade. I believe they used Scalecoat I on the original runs. I've got several set of those Red Ball sides from Merle Rice.He was in bad shape the last time I saw him, and don't know what his status is. Here is an old link to his business. He ran his businesses under many names, including Wabash Valley, Distinctive Depot, Huntington RR Models, etc. They built some real unique stuff back in the day.

    http://www.mrrwarehouse.com/wp-conte...March-2020.pdf

    Jim


    Leave a comment:


  • deemery
    replied
    I think these kits are from the '60s, but they use '50s "technology." Wabash Valley bought the Red Ball line. Bitter Creek now offers the same cast metal parts: https://bittercreekmodels.com (I particularly like the cast bolsters.)

    Mike Hohn has a great page on B&O cars: http://myplace.frontier.com/~mehohn/BO_boxcars.htm I'll pattern mine after his M3, but it'll be red and have different lettering.

    dave

    Leave a comment:


  • Larryc
    replied
    Dave those kits look really old. Are they from the 1950's? They look like the "old time" kits. Should be an interesting build.

    Leave a comment:


  • deemery
    replied
    The metal parts are epoxied onto the underframe. Before I glued the ends in place, I measured and drilled the pilot hole for the couplers and for the trucks.



    I used the rule-of-thumb that the center of the bolster should be the 'truck wheel base' from the end of the car, so that's scale 5'. The needle beams are located just outside (towards either end) of the door opening.

    dave

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X