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Winter Build Challenge:__Old Red Ball kits

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  • #16
    Dave very nice job on the boxcar. It would cost a lot of money to buy a car of that quality.
    Owner, General Manager, and all around "chief cook and bottle washer" of the Caz Coal-and-Wood Railroad

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    • #17
      Nice job there Dave. They came out a lot better than I thought they would.

      Good work indeed!

      Bob
      It's only make-believe

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      • #18
        The lettering appears to be from the 1888 Car-Builder’s Dictionary:



        Your car looks very nice.

        Mike
        _________________________________________________

        Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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        • #19
          Dave,

          How are the other cars coming?

          Mike,

          Do you have the 1888 Car builders Dictionary? If so, it is in great condition. I down loaded the 1895 Car Builders Dictionary and it is not as clear.

          Scott

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          • #20
            Scott,

            I have a paper copy of the 1888 CBD.

            I’ve noticed that some of the digitized CBDs are hard to read. The 1904-5 ones are not too bad.

            Mike
            _________________________________________________

            Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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            • #21
              Scott, I started on a couple other things. I did a cast resin small (1870s) hopper, I should write that one up. Then I scratchbuilt the 'switcher shed'. That project is moving along nicely. I like having a couple different projects going.

              dave
              Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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              • #22


                I've recently come to appreciate the early wood and cardstock kits, they capture a nice nostalgia for me which being born in 1980 I never lived through. I enjoy imagining how excited a kid or adult modeler would have been in the 1940s to open such a simple kit and see the printed sides and couple details and know that hand lettering wouldn't be necessary and that trucks didn't need to be scratchbuilt. With those early "kits", any sort of truck was exciting, even crude ones. The only other detail parts might be a couple ladders and rough brake wheel which required a lot of filing to clean up.

                I have a couple cars which are just a woodblock with a milled roof and cardstock sides which I will run at Christmas as a nostalgic old time train.

                I just finished a Binkley East Broad Top Boxcar which had some more detail parts than the swift kits; it too was satisfying to build at a higher standard and involved some careful paint blending and overspraying to blend the original silk screened car sides. Matching the sides and ends is the most difficult part of these models, but is really helpful in boosting realism. I only updated the sliding boxcar door castings, but used the original kit trucks, car ends, ladders and brakewheel. All were cast in a soft lead alloy and required loads of careful filing to get them free of loads of flash; but my labors were rewarded with fairly realistic detail parts.



                Blair

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