Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The 2021 Choices Challenge Main Thread

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by robert goslin

    Dave, those vintage kits look interesting. Exactly matching the colours may be a bit hard, but with some weathering should look good.

    Are they printed on paper or card ?

    Nice work Glen.
    Regards Rob

    Despite the cost of living, it's still popular

    My current build.

    https://railroad-line.com/node/40644

    Comment


    • #17
      Nice work Glen.
      Regards Rob

      Despite the cost of living, it's still popular

      My current build.

      https://railroad-line.com/node/40644

      Comment


      • #18
        Interesting approach, Glen. Start the build from the inside and work out.

        George
        Flying is the 2nd greatest thrill known to man. Landing is the first.

        Comment


        • #19
          Poking around, cleaning up after 7 months of very little modeling, the thing I really want to do now is complete my kitbash of Rix's "Vicky's Fashions" HO injection molded Smalltown USA modular building (1 point). When I last posted its picture it looked like this:



          I've started building its interior in between developing Venetian Blind textures for its windows. I'll update its thread as I go:

          http://railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52557
          James

          Comment


          • #20
            Hey Crew,

            Some Y’all may remember that on the previous version of the L&WS, I had the “Louisville Fertilizer & Gin” cotton processing complex, based on the actual complex in Louisville , GA and served by the 10-mile Louisville & Wadley RR. One of the structures was a large corrugated, slant-walled seed torage house.

            The current layout is based on the Wadley Southern Railway, which covered the 20 miles between Wadley and Swainsboro. The largest industry in Swainsboro was the J. C. Coleman Cotton Oil Mill, a division of the Southern Cotton Oil Co. Since no known photos exist of the Coleman complex, I’m using the cotton gin and processing plant from the LF&G complex, but the dang seed house is just too dang big, 9” x 12,” to fit my available space, 5” x 9,” so I need to build a new one.

            In his excellent article in the March-April 1988 Prototype Modeler, “Cotton Oil Mills,” Cyril Durrenberger included information and pictures of a small facility in Elgin, TX that included a much smaller seed house, also corrugated and also, with the distinctive slanted walls. This is the basis for my project. Following is a picture from Cyril’s article and a later color photo purloined from the Bay.





            With my 5” x 9” footprint in mind, I doodled around for a while to come up with drawings of the front and side views of the structure. I used what I think is the 6’ chain link fence to come up with some reasonable proportions that would capture the look and feel of the building while fitting the available space. Here are the sketches I came up with.



            Since this isn’t my first go around with a corrugated seed house, I’ve got a pretty good idea how to "git ‘er done." Here’s my starting point: a piece of 3/16” foam board, a coupla sheets of .040 Evergreen styrene, and a whole bunch of Campbell corrugated to be cut up into a bazillion itty-bitty pieces.



            OK, Crew, with pencil, HO ruler, and square in hand, as well as a passle of #11 blades, it’s time to git to some serious cuttin’ and pastin.’ Since this is a simple 1-point project, I’ll just keep progress posts in this thread.

            Take care and I’ll catch Y’all later.

            Steve

            Comment


            • #21
              George sounds like a fun project; enjoy.
              Owner, General Manager, and all around "chief cook and bottle washer" of the Caz Coal-and-Wood Railroad

              Comment


              • #22
                Glen that looks to be a nice project. Should make a fine looking structure.
                Owner, General Manager, and all around "chief cook and bottle washer" of the Caz Coal-and-Wood Railroad

                Comment


                • #23
                  Steve that looks to be a very interesting build. I've never seen a building with slanted walls before. Enjoy.
                  Owner, General Manager, and all around "chief cook and bottle washer" of the Caz Coal-and-Wood Railroad

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Good morning all. Looks like some very interesting projects. Everyone is getting a good start. I was wondering that since everything here is up in the air because of the move to the new house. If it would be alright to use one of the project that I built and photoed over the last year. I have done a couple of back ground building to go behind my upper yard. I have one that I want to use for the challenge. It started as a back ground building but grew in a full stand alone building.
                    Mike Mace

                    Northern Division of the Santa Fe

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      James. That's a lot of windows. Sure will keep you busy with the venetian blinds.

                      In the past I've used Excel to make venetian blinds.

                      Steve, wow, what an unusual building. Do you know why the walls are slanted ?

                      Being metal should be a nice opportunity the do some rust effects. Looking forward to your build.

                      Mike, Just join in. Always enjoy your work.
                      Regards Rob

                      Despite the cost of living, it's still popular

                      My current build.

                      https://railroad-line.com/node/40644

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Here's where I'm at with the boathouse.

                        I've added all the trim around the door frames, and corners.







                        And have made up the upper level door from balsa




                        Regards Rob

                        Despite the cost of living, it's still popular

                        My current build.

                        https://railroad-line.com/node/40644

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I don't know what the interior is like on the original, or if there even was any, so I'm just making up my own.

                          Have made up the interior floors. Just used some stirrer sticks, glued to a balsa subfloor.





                          I'm going to have interior stairs, so used Rusty Stumps stair stringer kit. very easy to build with their jig.



                          And the upper floor is just a piece of corrugated cardboard.


                          Regards Rob

                          Despite the cost of living, it's still popular

                          My current build.

                          https://railroad-line.com/node/40644

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            So where is everybody ?
                            Regards Rob

                            Despite the cost of living, it's still popular

                            My current build.

                            https://railroad-line.com/node/40644

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Hi everyone,

                              I want to join this challenge to help get my butt in gear.

                              I want to do 4, a scratch built tank car from the 1890s, in Z scale. Is the use of brass okay?

                              And 5, I also need to restart work on a barge I started a year ago.

                              Finally 8, I need to start bench work for my fist layout (the mini) and possibly track work.

                              Scott

                              Note, Can't seem to link my threads.:-(

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                I'm still here. I was just about to comment on your progress Robert. I like the complex angles that are being incorporated in your construction.

                                I'm still progressing on my station, just haven't posted an update quite yet.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X