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Kennebec Central Roundhouse

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  • Kennebec Central Roundhouse

    I wanted a small roundhouse to go on my HOn30 line. Someone suggested the Kennebec Central roundhouse shown here:

    https://twofootartist.com/kennebec-c...-rr-buildings/

    After fiddling with the floor plan to fit the slightly wider HOn30 locos, I printed out the footprint and checked. It'll fit nicely!



    dave
    Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

  • #2
    The next step was to do a sketch to capture the dimensions and cut-out locations.

    Here's a link to that full-size sketch: http://www.earlyrail.org/kc-roundhou...ouse-floor.jpg This shows the location of the track, the windows and doors, total dimensions, and the Tichy window and door parts I selected. They're not an exact match, but they're close enough for my (non-contest) model.

    There are still some design issues. The wall alongside the engine doors aren't very wide, so I need to decide how to handle the corner. My first thought, as shown on the sketch, is to try to cut a .1" length of clapboard siding on the front of the roundhouse, and then butt the side wall to that (hiding the joint with some trim.) But frankly I'm not sure that will work. The other alternative is to abandon the prototype's clapboard on that side of the enginehouse door, and instead use a thick post that will represent both the corner trim and the door trim/door support.

    dave
    Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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    • #3
      can you adapt a FSM kit to the footprint?

      Bob
      It's only make-believe

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      • #4
        That flat roof has me puzzled. Wouldn't it have to be heavily reinforced to hold the weight of Maine's snow? I think the walls would have to be thicker to hold the posts that support the roof beams.

        George
        The sky is not my limit, it's my playground.

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        • #5
          There's a gentle slope to that roof, but yeah I wondered about that. I also don't know what kind of roofing the structure had, presumably rolled roofing. Not enough slope for shingles to work, methinks....

          Bob, I suppose I could acquire and then rework an FSM kit, but it would take a fair amount of reworking to fit the space. The turntable is only 4", so the bays are (prototypically!) short. The nice thing about the KC roundhouse is that it's the right size and shape for my space. (Those Forneys are small locos!)

          dave
          Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

          Comment


          • #6
            Not sure how much activity you plan for the roundhouse for your operation scheme, if you are going to OP the layout, but....would it be possible, if NOT a lot of use, to use a bit of artist’s license and imagineering to make the smaller side of the roundhouse for show only and keep the dimensions closer to “correct” and disguise the slightly larger, in use, stall with the doors propped open and slightly larger to accommodate the larger loco?
            Karl Scribner-Curmudgeon

            Cedar Swamp
            SW of Manistique, MI

            AVATAR Image stolen from Model Train Stuff advertisement in my e-mail

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            • #7
              It's interesting that the doors on the prototype are different sizes, the right bay door is 3" wider.

              But I want to be able to park locos into both bays, and pull one out to pick up some cars to run up the mountain. I'm sure I'll end up with more locos than a RR of that size should have. (There's a new Shay model coming out, and it'll be REALLY HARD to resist adding that to the stable.)

              dave
              Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

              Comment


              • #8
                be following looks like a fun project

                rich
                In my many years I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame,

                two is a law firm and three or more is a congress.

                --John Adams

                Comment


                • #9
                  Dave, Can you add corner trim to the front edge of the left side wall and then on the front wall add clapboards up against the left edge of the left door trim?

                  Those clapboards could be longer than 0.1 inch so you can work with them, then sand the left edge of all those clapboards as a unit to fit up against the sidewall trim?

                  What will the clapboards be? If they are cardstock, could you glue them up for the entire front wall and then cut the left side as needed to fit against the sidewall?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Bill, I'm using Mt Albert S Scale clapboard stock. It's supposed to be 1/16" thick, but the piece I have is actually 3/32" It would be nearly impossible to cut a sliver of that only 1/16" wide.

                    So my approach is to build up some framing. The outside is 3/32 x 1/16 square (the "corner trim"). Next is scale 4" x 8" to frame the engine door opening. On the right side, it's 3/32 square and then 4 x 8 to add the framing for the door casting. This is the right side door, I figured it would be a bit easier to work out the approach before the smaller left side. I'm happy with this, it should work well.



                    After dinner I'll cut the left side front wall. Then I'll trim top and bottom of both front pieces. For this build, I'm doing the most challenging pieces first.

                    dave
                    Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Dave, On a walk this evening I saw a building that has what you are doing on the left side of front wall.

                      It stored a boat, not a locomotive.

                      The trim for the boat door was right against the corner trim on one side and

                      right against the trim for the regular door on the other side, no siding in between.

                      Looked fine. Didn't have camera with me, too dark anyway.

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                      • #12
                        I did some checks for the door size (height and width) against my Forney:



                        (Camera is tilted, if you look straight down the stack clears the door...)



                        dave
                        Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Then I finished laying out the rest of the walls, and cut out the window openings. The straight cuts were done mostly on my modeler table saw, being careful to keep things square, and placing masking tape over the clapboards where the blade would cut.



                          I also added the corner pieces. I'm still debating whether I should do an interior frame, which would add some bracing as well as detail.

                          Anyway, here's the first piece-together:



                          A couple other points I'm pondering:

                          1. Should I do a floor? That would add some rigidity to the structure. The floor height would have to be set to clear the track ties. (the alternative is to just run some track into the enginehouse and not worry about it.)

                          2. How will I attach the doors?

                          3. How will I paint this? The KC enginehouse doesn't match my standard RR colors (the coal shed to go with it is mineral red.)

                          So far, though, this is coming together nicely. Thanks to several of you for your private mails with additional information.

                          dave
                          Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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                          • #14
                            It is fitting together nicely.

                            Bob
                            It's only make-believe

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                            • #15
                              I added 1/16" studs to the inside walls. If I were doing a kit, I'd do full interior framing, but this should be good enough for what can be seen on the layout.



                              I also did the roundhouse floor. I wish I had 1/16 plywood, but all I could find was 1/16 basswood. So I cut the sub-floor from that, and glued those two pieces to some paper to keep them together. Then I laid rails (using Barge Cement to hold them in place), and added 1/16" thick 1/8" scribed siding.



                              Tomorrow's project will be painting the walls. Tonight I put sanding sealer on the outside, I'm letting that dry under weights.

                              dave
                              Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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