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28 Winter St. Newburyport - HO styrene

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  • 28 Winter St. Newburyport - HO styrene

    I started this build at a clinic I gave at the NER Mahwah convention in 2018. I cut a window in the wrong place and set it aside, but I got back to it today, with the Challenge in mind. Continued shortly.
    James


  • #2
    28 Winter St. is at the corner of Winter and Washington, perhaps 100 yards from the Newburyport depot. Newburyport's tax card says it was built in 1750, 36' wide along Winter and 40' deep along Washington.



    The historical survey hints that it's been painted this dark red since I was in college but I don't recall. By the time that photo was taken my childhood friend no longer lived two doors up and passenger service to Newburyport had been discontinued:

    https://www.cityofnewburyport.com/si...ter_street.pdf

    I don't know the owners, so I can't be exact about the side facing the tracks. But visitors to my layout won't see it either:





    I've got one wall finished, 3 more in progress. If I model the shed addition in back (under the huge lump of snow in the winter 2015 photo), there will be eight in all. The roof geometry can be diagrammed and cut easily. I am thinking about building in a 2nd floor to hold the structure square, leaving the roof removable.
    James

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    • #3
      Photo indicates an attic or third floor, which could be fun. Keep going!

      Love the colors, too, and recommend that you use them. As to the apparently unpainted back, well... as I understand it this was common. You also found clapboard fronts and shingles where they wouldn't be seen from the road. Have a ball!

      Pete

      in Michigan

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      • #4
        That’s a nice old house. It should make a great model.
        _________________________________________________

        Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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        • #5
          Thanks, Pete and Michael. The unpainted cedar shingles were widely used; my outbuildings had some 30 years ago. Also, in this area exterior sheathing lasts longest on the north side. I'm going to do my build as all clapboard, because the cedar would have collected a lot of soot in steam/coal heat days, particularly unpainted.



          I had mostly completed the two street-facing walls when work stalled in 2018. Now I've finished/fixed their window openings and cut the ends out. Next I examine windows on hand and decide if I need to scratchbuild some or all the end windows.

          Newburyport's on-line tax card for the property is the backdrop.
          James

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          • #6
            James, between you and Fred, it's going to be a great Spring and Summer for building.
            Frank

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            • #7
              Thanks, Frank. Regarding the Challenge, I did make a sketch, so this qualifies in that category too:



              Next I'll cut out the east back wall and make the window openings. Then the 2nd floor, which I'll make permanent to support the otherwise unstable shape.



              So far I've found reasonable commercial windows, but I had to scratchbuild the front door. 17 bits of styrene and a capillary applicator.
              James

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              • #8
                James,

                This looks to be quite a project, I will be following along with your progress. I don't model with styrene, but you appear to know how to do this well.

                Rich

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                • #9
                  quote:


                  Originally posted by jbvb





                  So far I've found reasonable commercial windows, but I had to scratchbuild the front door. 17 bits of styrene and a capillary applicator.



                  Wow! the patience...of the 17 you used how many 'bits' bit the dust-bin?
                  Karl Scribner-Curmudgeon

                  Cedar Swamp
                  SW of Manistique, MI

                  Avatar image by Savannah Lyn Burgess 7-15-2022

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                  • #10
                    Lessons to be learned using styrene.
                    Jerry



                    "And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

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                    • #11
                      Really nice looking door! Very clean work. I have been thinking a lot( lately) as to how much the 1/87 magnifies very small critters such as fuzz.

                      Which side of the house is visible from aisle?

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                      • #12
                        James, this looks like an interesting project.

                        By the work you've already done, your off to a great start!

                        Very nice work on that pieced together front door.

                        Greg Shinnie

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                        • #13
                          James,

                          This will keep you busy until Spring planting. It will be quite a build.

                          Jim
                          Take the red pill

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                          • #14
                            James

                            Wonderful start. You’ve done a good, precise job cutting out the window openings. And the door is also very well done.

                            Mike
                            _________________________________________________

                            Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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                            • #15
                              Thanks, Rich, Karl, Jerry, Bror, Greg, Jim & Mike. Karl, a few off-cuts went into the scrap bin but I don't recall wrecking anything. I could have done it with 2-3 fewer parts if I'd had a few more sizes of styrene on hand. Bror, the front door faces Winter St. and the aisle.



                              I used .080 square for the corner posts and .060 square to support the floor/wall joints. I did have to do some filing as assembly progressed. Waiting 2-3 minutes dries MEK joints enough to file.



                              With the most visible sides together, I can now start the tricky fitting of the inside corner, the plain walls between the original house and the shed extension and the shed itself.

                              Something I forgot to mention at the beginning: I'm using .040 spacing clapboard siding to represent the old 3.5" exposure used through the early 1800s.
                              James

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