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  • Bernd
    replied
    This thread will continue in the following thread: https://railroad-line.com/node/39637 NOTE: Link updated to new forum standard

    Bernd
    Last edited by Bernd; 10-03-2021, 06:19 PM.

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  • Bernd
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by k9wrangler

    Just a little chicken broth and some celery and carrots makes a nice crow stew....crow bones are tiny, tho.


    I don't know Karl. When you see what crows eat I don't think I could eat crow soup. :yuck: [:-sick] [xx(]

    quote:


    Sort of missed this thread after the first few pages but it made a nice couple hours of reading this evening. I'm amazed at the problem solving. The video on model spoked wheels was something, too.


    :up: :up:



    Glad you were entertained. I guess the problem solving comes from all the years of working on assembled machines and getting them running to demo to a customer. That was one of several jobs when I worked at my former employer.

    Trying to remember the spoked wheel video[?]

    Bernd

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  • k9wrangler
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by BurleyJim


    quote:


    Originally posted by Bernd


    If I'm wrong and it doesn't work I guess I'll have to eat crow. [^]

    Bernd


    If all ya got ta eat is crow, it ain't so bad.

    Jim


    Just a little chicken broth and some celery and carrots makes a nice crow stew....crow bones are tiny, tho.
    Sort of missed this thread after the first few pages but it made a nice couple hours of reading this evening. I'm amazed at the problem solving. The video on model spoked wheels was something, too.

    :up: :up:

    Leave a comment:


  • BurleyJim
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by Bernd


    If I'm wrong and it doesn't work I guess I'll have to eat crow. [^]

    Bernd


    If all ya got ta eat is crow, it ain't so bad.

    Jim

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  • Bernd
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by BurleyJim


    Bernd,

    When you look at the drive mechanism for the turntable, you might give these a look. https://www.ebay.com/itm/JX-PDI-6221...UAAOSwg8tZ~bKc These are high torque units that are easily interfaced to Arduino, Raspberry Pi, etc. The 360 degree rotation is really slick as I hung one off an Arduino Uno and rotated it 7200 degrees in both directions. It'll actually run continuous in either direction.

    Jim


    Thanks for the link. I've given a drive mechanism lot's of thought over the years. Electronics would be they way to go today with all the electronic goodies available. One problem I have with electronics if something goes wrong. I haven.t found a way to open up those IC chips to see what's wrong inside. Plus I really am not in favor of electronic indexing. I have a method that an ex-friend and I discussed many years ago. It's all mechanical and will line up the tracks perfectly. I just need to build it and verify it's viability. Why mechanical? The prototype is/was that way. Also only two wires will be needed for power and no computer code. If I'm wrong and it doesn't work I guess I'll have to eat crow. [^]

    Bernd

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  • BurleyJim
    replied
    Bernd,

    When you look at the drive mechanism for the turntable, you might give these a look. https://www.ebay.com/itm/JX-PDI-6221...UAAOSwg8tZ~bKc These are high torque units that are easily interfaced to Arduino, Raspberry Pi, etc. The 360 degree rotation is really slick as I hung one off an Arduino Uno and rotated it 7200 degrees in both directions. It'll actually run continuous in either direction.

    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • Bernd
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by john holt


    Well this project brings a whole new meaning to the term "Block Party". Nice work my friend. I just now got into this thread and have really enjoyed your methods and all the other suggested ways offered to fab/construct block walls. Back in the late 50s, a friend of mine had a couple of warts on his hand. His dad, who was a welder, would powder up some soap stone and rub it on the warts. It took awhile but later on the warts disappeared. Might want to bag that dust up and market as "Bernds Wart Remover". Oh well....just a thought. Might have been a good idea in late 50s, not so good in 2020. Looking forward to more progress. Take care.


    Hi John,

    Thanks for stopping by and thanks for the kind words, much appreciated.

    My way of doing things aren't always my own ideas. They come from reading the modeling magazines since the 60's. With improvements of materials and methods plus a little critical thinking helps in developing ways to do things.

    I like the idea of "Bernd's Wart Remover". Just thinking of how long it would take and how much it would cost to get FDA approval is a big turn off.

    More to come. Been working on gluing on the blocks. It's a long and tedious job. Reminds me of when I brick faced the house. I thought I'd never get done. But I did eventually.

    Bernd

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  • john_holt
    replied
    Well this project brings a whole new meaning to the term "Block Party". Nice work my friend. I just now got into this thread and have really enjoyed your methods and all the other suggested ways offered to fab/construct block walls. Back in the late 50s, a friend of mine had a couple of warts on his hand. His dad, who was a welder, would powder up some soap stone and rub it on the warts. It took awhile but later on the warts disappeared. Might want to bag that dust up and market as "Bernds Wart Remover". Oh well....just a thought. Might have been a good idea in late 50s, not so good in 2020. Looking forward to more progress. Take care.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bernd
    replied
    A short update on the two subjects of this post.

    While sawing the soapstone sticks into blocks I got to thinking about the roundhouse I want to build. It doesn't take much effort cutting those blocks while deep in thought about the roundhouse. I know it's going to be a "block" style facade, not brick. I think I've gathered enough info from a couple of forum members to make a master mold to cast the roundhouse walls. Next I needed some information on sizes. I surfed the net and came up with very little about sizes. Lot's of pictures though that helped with how they were built. The roundhouse will have 120 foot long stalls with a 130 foot diameter turntable. Using my CAD program I've drawn up some floor plans using a 10 degree indexing of the stalls. I did discover that there are other degrees of track indexing.

    So I'll post more as I get a bit more organized on the roundhouse.

    Bernd

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  • Bernd
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by thayer


    Bernd,

    Great machines, those Sherlines and their cousins.

    You absolutely can use your CNC mill as a lathe. I have done so a few times with my A2Z mill, to turn some rims for spoked wheels. You can see it in operation at the start of the video linked below. FWIW, I didn't bother to rotate the spindle, as I didn't need to extend the Z. Later in the video you will see my 4th axis in use as I drill the rims, and hubs. I turned the hubs manually, and just used CNC to drill them for the spokes.

    Thayer


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4gAIdgHU74


    Thayer,

    Ah yes. I see you use it in the vertical set up. I'm thinking of using mine in the horizontal set up. You're doing better than me utilizing the machine. I haven't tried anything that small yet. Nice job on those wheels by the way.

    Bernd

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  • thayer
    replied
    Bernd,

    Great machines, those Sherlines and their cousins.

    You absolutely can use your CNC mill as a lathe. I have done so a few times with my A2Z mill, to turn some rims for spoked wheels. You can see it in operation at the start of the video linked below. FWIW, I didn't bother to rotate the spindle, as I didn't need to extend the Z. Later in the video you will see my 4th axis in use as I drill the rims, and hubs. I turned the hubs manually, and just used CNC to drill them for the spokes.

    Thayer


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4gAIdgHU74

    Leave a comment:


  • Bernd
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by BurleyJim


    Bernd,

    I sure like that horizontal head set up. I need to figure out to build one for the Taig MicroMill.

    Jim


    Jim,

    I checked out the Taig site. Looked at the exploded view of the Min-mill. I don't think it can be done simply. You'd need to turn the column 90° to the table top and turn the spindle 90°. I didn't see anyway of that being possible.

    Bernd

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  • Bernd
    replied
    quote:


    Carl B wrote: I understood that explanation, and I think the whole operation is cool!


    Thanks for the video Bernd.



    You're welcome Carl. I think sometimes I get to technical. Glad my explanation was sufficient.


    quote:


    Mike wrote: Your explanation is very clear, especially now that I see the stop to the right. Thank you.


    You're welcome Mike. Glad is was clear. I can get a bit technical at times with terms that are used in the machining end of things.

    quote:


    Jim wrote: I sure like that horizontal head set up. I need to figure out to build one for the Taig MicroMill.


    That was one of the selling points for me. I haven't tried it yet but with the horizontal set up I might be able to turn it into a CNC lathe. I'll have to check out the Taig MicroMill and see if it's possible to make into a horizontal mill.

    Bernd

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  • BurleyJim
    replied
    Bernd,

    I sure like that horizontal head set up. I need to figure out to build one for the Taig MicroMill.

    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael_Hohn
    replied
    Bernd,

    Your explanation is very clear, especially now that I see the stop to the right. Thank you.

    Mike

    Leave a comment:

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