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Lou’s Logging Oxen Flatcar

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  • Lou’s Logging Oxen Flatcar

    Awhile back many of you seen my logging horse car build. You can find my Logging Horse Flatcar build here; http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/t...TOPIC_ID=48573

    Now I am attempting to build an Oxen flatcar for my logging company. Like before, I had found some "G" scale models, from Lothar Gauf, a guy called the diorama man, of Ox cars, see two pictures of his work below. It is his fantastic builds that give me the inspiration for these types of projects.





    Where these types of backwoods equipment were conjured up in backwoods shops, I going to use my artistic license and build my own version, using the parts shown below found at a local train show. An old Tyco caboose for the chassis/flatcar frame, Doctor Ben’s lumber for the decking and building materiel, some old figures, and badly painted cattle also found, to be repainted and turned into Oxen.



    An ox (plural oxen), is a bovine trained as a draft animal or riding animal. Oxen are commonly castrated adult male cattle, castration makes the animals more docile. Cows (adult females) or bulls (intact males) may also be used in some areas.

    My fire doesn’t burn as fast as it used to, so bear with me as I complete this build. It may be a Week, a Month or again who knows.


    Louis L&R Western Railroad
    Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

  • #2
    Hey Louis,

    Good to see you in action again. I'll be looking in on any new activity. Your creations give me inspiration.

    Bernd
    New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

    Comment


    • #3
      Louis, this looks like another interesting project from you. I'll enjoy watching you moove along with this one.

      Greg Shinnie

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:


        Originally posted by Bernd


        Hey Louis,

        Good to see you in action again. I'll be looking in on any new activity. Your creations give me inspiration.

        Bernd


        quote:


        Originally posted by Ensign


        Louis, this looks like another interesting project from you. I'll enjoy watching you moove along with this one.

        Greg Shinnie


        Thanks Bernd & Greg for always following along with advice and support.

        Turning these great "G" scale models, into HO scale models, is also the most fun for me with these type of projects.


        Louis L&R Western Railroad
        Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

        Comment


        • #5
          Louis, I see you’re breaking free from the yoke of conventionality once again. Excellent.

          I imagine the puns will be flying like turds from a manure spreader. Your readers have very fertile imaginations.

          Mike
          _________________________________________________

          Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

          Comment


          • #6
            Lou,

            Looking forward to another of your creative builds and the beastly comments.

            Watch out for those Rocky Mountain Oysters.

            Jim
            Take the red pill

            Comment


            • #7
              It looks like you have assembled most of the materials needed, Louis. I'll be following along. :up:
              Bruce

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks Mike, Jim and Bruce for your comments.

                The first idea and change I’m going to make is that two of my Oxen will be wearing a yoke, and become a team. So after tossing around some ideas on how to build it, I put together some parts to use. See picture for yoke parts.

                For those of you that like research and prototype information read here;

                https://static1.squarespace.com/stat...+TechGuide.pdf





                Basically find a hardwood beam approximately 50 to 80 inches long and about 6 to 10 inches across/deep. The size of the beam will depend a lot on the ultimate size of the oxen. Cut neck areas and smooth out the edges until they are fairly smooth and round out the depressions where the necks of the oxen will go. Use a drill to puncture four holes through the yoke. Near each edge, above the area where you've grooved out the neck depressions, drill two holes right through. Base their width on the width of your oxen's neck. Do likewise above the other neck depression. You want these holes to be about 1.5 to 2 inches wide. Cut two lengths of bow stock for the neck braces. These will be 50 to 70 inches long and rounded. You want these two lengths to be about 1.5 to 2 inches wide. Steam heat them, and then bend them both into a U shape. Bend them so they correspond to the width of the spaces between each pair of holes on each end of the yoke. Drill a horizontal hole into one end of each of the U shaped bow stock pieces. Carve a wooden peg which will slide through this hole and snugly fit within it. Insert the bow stock pieces into paired holes on each end of the yoke and notch them so they stay in place. The yoke is basically done.

                As seen in the picture below, I’m going to use a match stick (scale measurement for HO scale) for the yoke top beam depth, and another piece of the match stick glued to the first to build up for the yoke width, where I cut out the neck depressions to form the yoke shape. Also, a jump ring for yoke, and pieces of floral wire to form the two Ox neck bows will be used.




                Louis L&R Western Railroad
                Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

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                • #9
                  Another cool Louis project to follow. Watching too.....
                  Carl

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                  • #10
                    quote:


                    Originally posted by Carl B


                    Another cool Louis project to follow. Watching too.....


                    Thanks Carl! :up:

                    I scaled down the Yoke drawing template to HO scale, and printed three copies so I could make up a couple of extra yokes for the logging company. A template will be cut out, and glued with white glue to a piece of the matchstick as a guide to form the yoke. The yoke is small enough you could use styrene, cardboard, balsa wood, or even paper stock. I’m just one of those modelers that like to go just short of insanity when detail making.




                    Louis L&R Western Railroad
                    Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:


                      Originally posted by desertdrover

                      I’m just one of those modelers that like to go just short of insanity when detail making.


                      I think you have some competition from Tony Burgess. [)] And that's no bull!

                      Bernd
                      New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        quote:


                        Originally posted by Bernd


                        quote:


                        Originally posted by desertdrover

                        I’m just one of those modelers that like to go just short of insanity when detail making.


                        I think you have some competition from Tony Burgess. [)] And that's no bull!

                        Bernd



                        That's a fact Bernd, Tony is another, one of many members of this great Forum's modeling obsessions.

                        Here's an update; I took the match stick and cut it in half, gluing the two pieces together to make up the wood width needed for the yoke. After gluing the yoke paper templates to the wooden matchstick, cutout the front yoke shape with modeling tools of your choice as I did. Then cut around the top template for the final shape of the yoke. Now you just have to sand lightly the yoke edges and around the neck areas. Pictures below show where I am at for the moment. Test fit (and camera shots that bring out what else is needed) shows a little more sanding and shaping is needed. Than onto drilling the neck bow holes into the yoke. After drilling the holes for the neck bows from the top template, sand the paper template remains from the wood and stain, paint or just leave it a natural wood look. I believe I’ll be staining mine with a brown leather dye mixture.






                        Louis L&R Western Railroad
                        Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          More update: Below is the finished Oxen Yoke. The 4mm jump ring that I was going to use for the center hitch point ring was too large, so I substituted that ring using a link from a piece of chain I had, and attached it to the yoke using a Diesel Details #2206 wire eye bolt. Shown in the picture below. I scraped the green cloth off of the 24 Ga. Floral wire and formed two yoke neck bows to slide into the yoke where the holes were drilled out on each side for the Oxen necks. The wooden yoke was stained using a brown leather dye stain mixture. The wire neck bows will be painted brown to look like wood once the yoke is placed onto the Oxen. The wire neck bows are a secure sprung fit into the yoke, so the yoke can be removable from the Oxen team.






                          Louis L&R Western Railroad
                          Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            Looking good Louis. Geez...you can almost smell the aroma from Lothar Gauf's G scale build!

                            Looking forward to your build…

                            Bob

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                            • #15
                              Louis, nice work on piecing that all together!

                              I'm not yoking either.


                              Greg Shinnie

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