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Stone Walled !!!!

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  • Stone Walled !!!!

    Hi All Have totally lost all prospective on the "look" of this.

    Would like some feedback on how it looks. Good or bad don't hold back.

    I'm not concerned about the colours they are just the result of using A/I to help see the individual stones.



    Cheers Tom. :erm:

  • #2
    Tom, Looks good to me. That one stone on the upper right side of the upper window looks quite big for

    that high up but that's a small matter. How are you making the stones?

    Bob
    http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=30102

    http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51837

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Bob "big" stone is a patch up I havn't re carved yet.

      Mainly used yellow thumb tack and small file that's in photo.



      Cheers Tom.

      Comment


      • #4
        Tom,

        Looks great to me. I like the amount of relief you created. And you are pretty consistent in the general size of the stones throughout, with what seems like appropriate variations in size, such as the larger ones at the base.

        Are you trying to capture the look of a particular building or type of building?

        Mike
        _________________________________________________

        Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

        Comment


        • #5
          Tom,

          Stone carvings are good! This wall will make an impressive building and the coloring will make it pop. Glad to see you remembered the lintels...half the time I forget to add them.

          Dave
          Dave

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          • #6
            Looks very good.

            What scale? ... and is this plaster?
            Carl

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            • #7
              Tom, you have achieved a very good look to the stones. Nice carving/etching. Did you dampen the surface of the wall before forming the stones,or attack it dry?
              Bruce

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              • #8
                Nice stonework, Tom. It looks like the stone courses tilt to the left.

                George
                Flying is the 2nd greatest thrill known to man. Landing is the first.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Not bad. Here's a picture of a gristmill in Sudsbury MA. Honestly, it would be a workout trying to get that irregular look, but it will give you some ideas as to how the stones are textured and fit.



                  Link to my blog with more pictures. I'd put them up here, but there are too many to upload.

                  http://www.nebrownstone.com/blog/mill-stones/

                  I found a dental hand-piece works the best for stone carving. It's basically a Dremel with a foot pedal and is soooo much easier to control than carving with a knife or dental pick. Picks are useful, but not what I consider a standard tool, for me. They wander too much. Of all my tools that I use for carving stone, the dental hand piece and a #11 knife are about all I use. Well, those and a toothbrush and one of those pin point adjustable wire brushes. But that's about it.

                  If you have a picture of a wall you can print it out on paper, then trace the grout lines. Once you have your tracing, retrace it onto the work piece by using a piece of carbon paper to transfer the pattern. Mind you, the carbon can get messy, but it works well.

                  I've also seen where one guy had printed out his drawings and mounted them to some foam core to create his forms to pour his plaster building. I want to say this was from a Narrow Gauge and Shortline Gazette article about a dynamite shack or oil storage building. When he stripped the mold the ink from the printed drawings had bled into the plaster leaving a perfect pattern to carve. I've never tried this, but it's worth a look into.
                  Russ

                  It's not Practice makes Perfect, It's Perfect Practice makes Perfect

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Tom, I think that Russ of NEBrownstone is a master craftsman with the material and one of a handful of magnificent 'stonemasons' in the hobby. I believe that all the comments generated are valid and excellent feedback.

                    I'm thinking that you might be at that point in construction where items look out of balance. The lintels for example look too long in the horizontal plane. This is good as you've got the correct lengths when the window frames are in play.

                    My one concern is the roof angle. This could easily be a photo angle issue, but it appears that the two slopes are at slightly different angles, thus making the wall heights different. May be hard to determine now, but may present a few issues when the second end wall and lid is in place.

                    Again great carving and I'm looking forward to seeing additional progress reports.
                    -- KP --

                    Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Tom, The overall effect of your stone carving is very good - you avoided the "jigsaw pieces" look that many modeled walls have where each stone fit exactly against its surrounding neighbors, separated by a uniform gap/mortar line. One thing that shows up after looking awhile is that the stones are pretty much the same height in any given row, kinda like rows of bricks. The height varies from row to row, but within a given row it is the same and that is a different look than the field stones in the prototype photo above. depending on how you color the stones and where the model is located that may not be noticeable.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks KP.

                        Of all the possible wall patterns out there this one is the least desirable:

                        This will make a noob mason cringe. You can tell it is fake and fits the puzzle piece comment to a T. Stone walls are coursed, even though it seems like they may not be due to header stones that break up the courses.

                        You can see the headers in the first couple stonewalls. they are those big stones. These are obviously retaining walls, but a buildings walls can also have header stones.

                        http://www.nebrownstone.com/blog/gallery/stone-work/
                        Russ

                        It's not Practice makes Perfect, It's Perfect Practice makes Perfect

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for all feedback.

                          Michael : Have a look at Russ's photo

                          Dave : Just like soup DON'T forget the lentils

                          Carl B : Sorry should have mentioned O scale and it is plaster of paris.

                          Bruce : I started "scribing" as the plaster was in that "green" stage, but now it's dry it "chips" and gives odd lines and shape,not a lot of control over it, sometimes Idampen it and crave, you have better control.

                          George : bad photo. I hope

                          Russ :

                          [:-censored] THAT'S WHAT I"M AFTER !!!!!!

                          Comment


                          • #14

                            quote:


                            Tom, I think that Russ of NEBrownstone is a master craftsman with the material and one of a handful of magnificent 'stonemasons' in the hobby. I believe that all the comments generated are valid and excellent feedback.


                            I'm thinking that you might be at that point in construction where items look out of balance. The lintels for example look too long in the horizontal plane. This is good as you've got the correct lengths when the window frames are in play.

                            My one concern is the roof angle. This could easily be a photo angle issue, but it appears that the two slopes are at slightly different angles, thus making the wall heights different. May be hard to determine now, but may present a few issues when the second end wall and lid is in place.

                            Again great carving and I'm looking forward to seeing additional progress reports.



                            Kris : I have spent hours on this and have started to wonder if it's heading in the right direction go a little :crazy:

                            window openings need to go bigger, to suit frames, both walls are same height good pick up :up:

                            Bill : [:-bulb] mate that just hit me then !!

                            It really stands out, I might wet down and fill up a few mortar lines and re crave.

                            http://www.nebrownstone.com/blog/gallery/stone-work/

                            :up: :up: :up:

                            Cheers Tom.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Yes to filling. I do it all the time to hide joints and to fill in bubble holes. Yeah, even I get them. Mix up a slurry of plaster water (50:50) and with a cheap eye dropper drop a drop of plaster where you need filling. Give it a few minutes for the water to get absorbed into the surrounding casting, then you can use a knife to carve away the bulk of the drops. It's real easy to carve because it is still wet. Watch it so you don't end up carving into the base stone.

                              I then use a regular toothbrush to clean off the rest. TIP: if you attack the wall with the brush at a 45 degree angle to the grout lines the brush will rid over the grout line leaving them filled in. If you go with the grout lines, you'll remove the plaster fill.

                              I then blow down everything with compressed air to blast out those tiny plaster particles that would otherwise end up gluing themselves to the work piece. Yes, compressed air is very helpful during carving.

                              I will say this, most of my techniques were derived from some mistake. I didn't like something, so I learned to fix it with what I had. Also, I didn't get to the point I'm at overnight. It does take patience, but once you get the hang of a few techniques there aren't too many walls you can't duplicate. Anyone can learn the techniques. Believe me, my first walls looked horrible to what I make now.

                              The biggest issue I see is the laying out of the pattern so that it looks realistic. Which all leads to having a butt load of pictures to study and copy.

                              I'd say feel free to email me with any questions, but it'd probably be best for any questions to be put here in this thread for everyone's use.
                              Russ

                              It's not Practice makes Perfect, It's Perfect Practice makes Perfect

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