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Accurail N.P. Reefer will not stay on the track!!

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  • Accurail N.P. Reefer will not stay on the track!!

    I have a new Accurail Northern Pacific wood sided reefer that will not stay on the track and tends to trip up at crossings and turn-outs. Track is Atlas Code 100. Trucks are stock from the kit and have had a Micromark TruckTruing Tool used on them. Wheels are Life Like P2K wheel sets, Couplers are Kadee #5s. The trucks turn freely on the bolsters and dip from side to side and front to back. The couplers operate fine and the trip pins are at the nominal height above the rail as confirmed by my Kadee 205 Height Gauge.

    I'm at a loss as to what to check next. Of course when I run the car across the places it derails, by itself it is good boy and stays on the track! I have three of these cars with different road numbers and this is the only one giving me problems.

    Do you have a suggestion on what to check/adjust?

  • #2
    Weight?

    Does it derail only in one direction and regardless of order/placement in a train?
    In a time like ours seemings and portents signify. Ours is a generation when dogs howl and the skin crawls on the skull with its beast's foreboding.

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    • #3
      Check the guage on the wheels, one or more wheels may be out of guage (wheels too close or too far apart on axles).

      Check to see the wheels are centered, that the wheels are near the same distance from the axle ends on both sides. Having wheels too far to one side can cause the truck to "crab" down the tracks.

      Quick and dirty check, swap out the wheels/axles with another set. That should take 2-3 min. If it fixes it you already have the wheels out to adjust them.
      Dave Husman



      Iron Men and wooden cars

      Visit my website : www.wnbranch.com

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      • #4
        Go to this link and there is some good reading material on subject; http://www.modelbaneteknik.dk/model/stnd/afsp-e.htm


        Louis L&R Western Railroad
        Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

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        • #5
          Swap out parts i.e.: trucks with another car of the trio and see if the problem occurs on the same or different car. Have you added weight to the cars to NMRA specs? I use 4oz total for 36-40 footers.

          Check that truck screws ar loose enough to allow tuck to move but not so loose the truck is too loose.
          Karl Scribner-Curmudgeon

          Cedar Swamp
          SW of Manistique, MI

          AVATAR Image stolen from Model Train Stuff advertisement in my e-mail

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          • #6
            Can you watch the troublesome car at any of these locations close up, with your eyes at rail level? That often reveals the problem.
            James

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            • #7
              The car weight is per NMRA's suggestions. I just got through swapping out the trucks and found that made the difference and the problem is the naughty car had Code 88 wheels. I have code 88 wheels on other cars and although they have shown me some of my problem track, for the most part they worked O.K.! Why this one is so bad, I don't know. Repair was to replace the Code 88s with Code 110s. I think I have maybe 24 Code 88 Wheel-Sets, anyone interest in these?

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              • #8
                I've found the semi-scale treads are good at finding broad gauge spots in standard gauge track. I put some into my operating fleet a few years ago and once I got rid of the initial problems, have been satisfied. But the extra work might not be worth it if you don't like the way they look in end-on close-ups of freight cars...
                James

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                • #9
                  I can see that the Code 88 are more scale like and I would think that's where they would look best, is in the end on views of rolling stock. I would be fine with having one car with Code 88 wheel sets, that is used to check track-work and point out problem areas. But to use them for more than that, I don't feel worth my time, when Code 110 wheels work so well. While the end on view is important to some, it is not to me, I think it's more important that the treads be shinny than a more scale width. But, that's me.

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                  • #10
                    This all goes back to my thread on wondering what happened to the highly detailed P2K line of wheel sets.

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                    • #11
                      I'd rather have the layout work than worry so much about details on an operations oriented layout.
                      Karl Scribner-Curmudgeon

                      Cedar Swamp
                      SW of Manistique, MI

                      AVATAR Image stolen from Model Train Stuff advertisement in my e-mail

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                      • #12
                        I take it you are a fan of the P2K line of wheel sets Mark, but I found the Intermountain wheel sets to be much better. Just my opinion here.

                        Also, just a note: I believe that Branchline Blueprint Wheel Sets are the same as PK2 sets.


                        Louis L&R Western Railroad
                        Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

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                        • #13
                          desertdrover, you are right, I WAS a fan of the P2K wheel-sets, which I don't believe are the same anymore and the replacement 33" wheel-sets have not been available for at least a year. I have been trying various manufacturer's wheel sets lately and have not found any I like, so far. At MODELTRAINSTUFF, where I do most of my shopping, none of the Reboxx wheels shown state that they are Code 88, same with Intermountain, they do not state what width their wheels are. It's my understanding that 40050 Intermountain wheel-sets are Code 110, although nothing in the description states this. So far the only metal wheel sets I've found that are O.K. are the Kadee although I don't care for the black treads.

                          Per k9wrongler: "I'd rather have the layout work than worry so much about details on an operations oriented layout". This is exactly what I am trying to do! Code 88 wheels are not as reliable as Code 110 on my layout. Who ever said that my layout is "Operations Oriented" maybe your talking about your own layout? I love to build models, operations take a back seat to my interest in pursuing realism to my own set of standards!

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                          • #14
                            The Intermountain 40050 wheels have a more standard 0.11" tread. The 40052’s Semi-Scale Wheelsets have 0.088" treads, which are closer to scale. The regular wheels are .110" tread width, and semi-scale is .088" tread width. The semi-scale wheels look closer to prototype tread width but don't require 100% perfect track work. And as you say you are after the prototype look in your modeling.

                            NOTE; as you know The codes for wheels are for the width of the wheel not tracks e.g. 110=0.011", 88= 0.088", etc.

                            Reboxx website shows their wheels as being (0.088"); http://www.reboxx.com/products.htm


                            Louis L&R Western Railroad
                            Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

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                            • #15
                              desertdrover, this is Understood. I feel the people selling the wheel-sets have an obligation of explaining the facts/specifications about the wheel-sets they sell.

                              I don't recall stating I am after prototype realism, obviously if I was, I wouldn't be averse to using Code 88 wheels! I simply like the things I like.

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